Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources
Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources
Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources
University of California
Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources

Help protect California's citrus trees

UC Agriculture and Natural Resources is encouraging all Californians to check the new growth on their citrus trees for Asian citrus psyllids and take action if they are found. See details in the four-minute video below.

Help us get the word out. Please share the video on social media and embed on websites.

Contacts:

Commercial farmers: UC Cooperative Extension in your county
Home growers: UC Master Gardener Program in your area
News media: UC ANR ACP/HLB experts list
Jeannette Warnert, (559) 240-9850, jewarnert@ucanr.edu

 

Spring in California is time to inspect citrus trees for Asian citrus psyllid

A tell-tale sign of spring in California is a flush of new leaf growth on citrus trees. Because the feathery light green leaves are particularly attractive to Asian citrus psyllids (ACP), the leaves’ emergence marks a critical time to determine whether the pest has infested trees.

“We encourage home citrus growers and farmers to go out with a magnifying glass or hand lens and look closely at the new growth,” said Beth Grafton-Cardwell, UC Agriculture and Natural Resources (UC ANR) citrus entomologist. “Look for the various stages of the psyllid – small yellow eggs, sesame-seed sized yellow ACP young with curly white tubules, or aphid-like adults that perch with their hind quarters angled up.”

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B-roll videos for download

Click here for B-roll videos in MP4 to download.

Video-clips

 

Click photo to download image

Asian citrus psyllid nymphs
Asian citrus psyllid nymphs
Asian citrus psyllid nymphs excrete distinctive waxy tubules.
Asian citrus psyllid nymphs excrete distinctive waxy tubules.
Asian citrus psyllids feeding on citrus leaves
Asian citrus psyllids feeding on citrus leaves
Asian citrus psyllids often perch with their hindquarters raised.
Asian citrus psyllids often perch with their hindquarters raised.
Asian citrus psyllids typically congregate on new growth.
Asian citrus psyllids typically congregate on new growth.
Beth Grafton-Cardwell, UC Cooperative Extension specialist in citrus entomology
Beth Grafton-Cardwell, UC Cooperative Extension specialist in citrus entomology
Chlorosis of Citrus Leaves
Chlorosis of Citrus Leaves
Citrus fruit malformed by huanglongbing
Citrus fruit malformed by huanglongbing
Citrus leaves distorted and malformed by psyllid feeding.
Citrus leaves distorted and malformed by psyllid feeding.
Citrus Psyllid Infection
Citrus Psyllid Infection
Citrus trees with huanglongbing
Citrus trees with huanglongbing
Leaves on a huanglongbing infected tree in Florida.
Leaves on a huanglongbing infected tree in Florida.
Mottling and chlorosis of leaves on citrus tree
Mottling and chlorosis of leaves on citrus tree
Tamarixa radiata (Waterson) wasp
Tamarixa radiata (Waterson) wasp
Twisted Citrus Flush
Twisted Citrus Flush
Webmaster Email: jewarnert@ucanr.edu