Skip to Content
Happenings in the insect world
Comments:
by MIke P
on December 17, 2014 at 3:18 PM
From my backyard bees in Los Angeles County I have found the purchased bred European bees suffer CCD easier than the feral bees I have captured. Either way it's exhausting to see a complete hive empty in a week. Actually 2 of 4 this year. Then obviously my feral bees go in and take all the honey. My sample is statistically insignificant, of course, and nothing compared to commercial losses. Whatever it is, please find out!  
MP
by Gabriele A O'Neill
on December 17, 2014 at 5:51 PM
Dr. Shelomi pretty much spelled out, if not the reasons, then certainly one of the solutions to this problem: better nutrition for the bees: no HFCS, no more carting them around for hundreds of miles to pollinate almond orchards, breeding hardier varieties, maybe even at the expense of the amount of honey production, since obviously not all bees have this problem, but mainly the Italian honeybee, which has been favored for commercial reasons in the U.S., eliminating pesticide pressure on the bees, etc. etc.
by Dan Rivers
on December 18, 2014 at 2:14 PM
We had a colony of honey bees move in under the eaves of our pump house. I like to think it's because of our bee-friendly efforts.  
 
On a recent hike at Knights Ferry, CA, my daughter and I observed bees busy in a willow tree, which, with a little research, prompted this (from this amateur entomologist/poet):  
 
hungry honey bees  
baskets full of willow rust  
encouraged by rain
by Bienfait
on September 13, 2017 at 2:52 AM
I think that bee populations may also be vulnerable to recent increase in atmospheric electromagnetic radiation as a result of growing numbers of cell phones and wireless communication towers
 
Leave a Reply:

You are currently not signed in. If you have an account, then sign in now!
Anonymous users messages may be delayed.
 

Security Code:
TPKTTU