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Happenings in the insect world
Comments:
by Anne Schellman
on July 2, 2015 at 9:44 AM
Great post! Very interesting observation about the buckeye butterfly. I wonder why it hasn't been seen, and why it has that particular name?
by Pete Veilleux
on July 3, 2015 at 6:49 PM
a couple years ago, i had this experience off Lucas Ranch Rd, in Marin County. There are several huge buckeyes and they were all at peak flowering. There was a large stack of hives about one hundred feet away and the trees were loaded w/ honeybees - millions of them. i got close to take some pics and got quickly swarmed. i was bitten five times on the face and my friend who was w/ me was bitten 9 times - all in about 5 minutes. i haven't been bitten in around 20 years and i keep hives at my native plant nursery. i've often found a few dead bees under flowering buckeyes, but for the millions of bees going nuts over them, this is a very small percentage. for all the buckeyes there are in and around populated areas of california, there have been very few poisonings from them, from what i can tell. i am looking for some real statistics on buckeye poisoning rather than just rumor and speculation. Please email me if you know of a source for these.  
 
Quite a few years ago, i had another interesting encounter under a buckeye forest which was dropping it's fruit. This was along Mines Road, South of Livermore, CA. I was seeing many, many California Newts [Taricha tarosa]. They had made many shallow holes under the buckeyes and in front of the holes, there were piles of chewed up buckeye seeds. The larger holes had larger piles and the inhabiting newts were in front of most of these holes - doing their push-up communicating. I think that they were all or mostly males and they were attempting to attract mates. I had the strong feeling that the mates were chosen by the size of the pile of chewed up buckeye seeds in front of their holes. I'm sure that there was something about the push-ups which also signaled a good mate, and probably the shallow holes which had been scooped out by the inhabitant.  
 
I've never heard of anyone else observing this strange newt behavior with buckeyes. I'm wondering if maybe the newt gets it's toxicity from ingesting buckeye seeds? I'd love to hear from others who have observed this behavior before. I'm also willing to take some scientists to observe this where i did. I'm sure that we'll have o time it exactly right, but i'll give it my best to figure it out.
by Pete Veilleux
on July 3, 2015 at 6:49 PM
A couple years ago, i had this experience off Lucas Ranch Rd, in Marin County. There are several huge buckeyes and they were all at peak flowering. There was a large stack of hives about one hundred feet away and the trees were loaded w/ honeybees - millions of them. I got close to take some pics and got quickly swarmed. i was bitten five times on the face and my friend who was w/ me was bitten 9 times - all in about 5 minutes. i haven't been bitten in around 20 years and i keep hives at my native plant nursery. i've often found a few dead bees under flowering buckeyes, but for the millions of bees going nuts over them, this is a very small percentage. for all the buckeyes there are in and around populated areas of california, there have been very few poisonings from them, from what i can tell. i am looking for some real statistics on buckeye poisoning rather than just rumor and speculation. Please email me if you know of a source for these.  
 
Quite a few years ago, i had another interesting encounter under a buckeye forest which was dropping its fruit. This was along Mines Road, South of Livermore, CA. I was seeing many, many California Newts [Taricha tarosa]. They had made many shallow holes under the buckeyes and in front of the holes, there were piles of chewed- up buckeye seeds. The larger holes had larger piles and the inhabiting newts were in front of most of these holes - doing their push-up communicating. I think that they were all or mostly males and they were attempting to attract mates. I had the strong feeling that the mates were chosen by the size of the pile of chewed -up buckeye seeds in front of their holes. I'm sure that there was something about the push-ups which also signaled a good mate, and probably the shallow holes which had been scooped out by the inhabitant.  
 
I've never heard of anyone else observing this strange newt behavior with buckeyes. I'm wondering if maybe the newt gets it's toxicity from ingesting buckeye seeds? I'd love to hear from others who have observed this behavior before. I'm also willing to take some scientists to observe this where i did. I'm sure that we'll have to time it exactly right, but i'll give it my best to figure it out.
by kumusands
on October 13, 2017 at 6:55 AM
Plant poisoning among children is usually unintentional due mostly to parenteral neglect. Presence of poisonous plants in the home garden is the strongest risk factor for plant poisoning.
 
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