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Weed control, management, ecology, and minutia
Comments:
by Steve M Sanguinetti
on March 23, 2017 at 8:56 AM
Please clarify above claims that pesticide poisoning is a major factor in unintentional injuries. Looking at CDC data for 2015 Unintentional injuries, all ages for class 48 (accidental poisoning by pesticides) I found a total of 4. While that's 4 more than should have happened it does make up a major portion. Also, it might be important to note that drug and alcohol related injuries make up by far the greatest portion of unintended injuries.
by Steve M Sanguinetti
on March 23, 2017 at 9:00 AM
Edit to previous comment (does not) should have been included.  
Please clarify above claims that pesticide poisoning is a major factor in unintentional injuries. Looking at CDC data for 2015 Unintentional injuries, all ages for class 48 (accidental poisoning by pesticides) I found a total of 4. While that's 4 more than should have happened it does not make up a major portion. Also, it might be important to note that drug and alcohol related injuries make up by far the greatest portion of unintended injuries.
by Stephanie Parreira
on May 25, 2017 at 11:55 AM
Hi Steve,  
I appreciate your feedback. I realize now that the way the sentence is structured can read as attributing the 1073 people poisoned to CDC data. This number is from the California Pesticide Illness Surveillance Program report: http://www.cdpr.ca.gov/docs/whs/pisp/2014/2014fsummary.pdf. You will find the numbers on the fifth page (Executive Summary) of the document. We will do better to present our information sources more clearly in the future.  
 
The CDC information you mention pertaining to fatal pesticide poisonings is correct. We wanted to discuss both fatal and nonfatal pesticide poisonings in this post to create a more comprehensive picture of the pesticide poisoning issue.  
 
Thank you again for your comment.
by Stephanie Parreira
on May 25, 2017 at 3:46 PM
Clarification: When handling or applying pesticides, do so in accordance with all the label instructions and state and local regulations. In California, regulations often require additional precautions that may not be stated on the pesticide label, such as the use of chemical-resistant gloves, protective eyewear that shields the brow and temple area, and other equipment. This equipment is required to be worn during pesticide handling with few exceptions (consult the Code of California Regulations, section 6738, for more information). The tips described in this blog post are not an exhaustive list of safety measures that prevent pesticide poisoning.  
 
If you apply pesticides anywhere outside of the home and garden, or if you work in areas where pesticides are applied, you must also comply with the annual training and certification requirements listed in CCR 6724 and 6764 (links below). Pesticide handler and fieldworker training helps prevent pesticide hazards and poisoning. This blog post cannot be used as a substitute for required training.  
 
http://www.cdpr.ca.gov/docs/legbills/calcode/030302.htm#a6738  
http://www.cdpr.ca.gov/docs/legbills/calcode/030302.htm#a6724  
http://www.cdpr.ca.gov/docs/legbills/calcode/030303.htm#a6764
 
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