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Green news from the UC Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources
Hills
Comments:
by Susie Kocher
on April 18, 2018 at 3:45 PM
I think this is really great and really important. Thanks for doing it.
by Paula Henson
on April 19, 2018 at 10:44 AM
Please use the botanical names of the trees--there are many species of Acacia!
by Seanain Snow
on April 20, 2018 at 9:58 AM
Ditto what Paula said!
by Janet Hartin
on April 27, 2018 at 1:24 PM
Hi all, I’ll post genus and species names tonight when I’m back at my computer
by janet
on April 27, 2018 at 3:14 PM
Acacia aneura (mulga) is included in both the coastal and inland trials discussed in Jeannette's blog. We are also looking more closely at mulch/no mulch treatments on four species from the larger study in partnership with Chino Basin Water Conservation District in Montclair. I have a power point if anyone would like to use it. Janet Hartin
by Mike Letteriello
on May 1, 2018 at 8:00 AM
I love many of the native trees on this list and I've planted them myself (especially I recommend the Island Oak of California) but it's a shame when I contemplate that we even have to cope with such rapid climate change. I don't know about the survival of the vegetation that requires more moisture; I've seen our seasonal creeks and streams dry up, and it could be really rough sledding, worse than now, for our plants and wild animals.
by Tracy
on May 2, 2018 at 10:14 AM
Inherited a common Hackberry more than 55 years old on a property that we purchased 11 years ago. large tree with swooping down turning branches withstands high temperatures and the Santa Anna winds Located in the San Fernando Valley suburb of Los Angeles 91306.
by Steven Barryte
on May 4, 2018 at 9:27 PM
In addition to drought, soil & wind tolerance information, when publishing results, please also include fire resistance information. Thanks.
by Gary Jones
on May 15, 2018 at 10:30 AM
Can you please provide the botanical names for all the trees? Acacia means nothing. Thanks!
by Tina Cremer
on May 16, 2018 at 10:41 AM
Please send the botanical names, CV, SSP and Species. Thank you for this study.
by Jacqueline Soule
on May 16, 2018 at 3:16 PM
I am sure you worked hard on this but it is entirely useless without the scientific names. There are over 15 trees called "ironwood."  
 
Furthermore if by "blue palo verde" you mean Parkinsonia florida then you have the wrong species in your image. And anyway, Parkinsonia X 'Desert Museum' is a far better choice of any Parkinsonia - being of hybrid origin it still blooms but doesn't litter with seeds. The one at the LA Natural History Museum is doing quite well.
 
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