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KAC Citrus Entomology
University of California
KAC Citrus Entomology

Fuller Rose Beetle

Fuller rose beetle adult
Fuller rose beetle adult
Characteristic Fuller rose beetle damage to leaves
Characteristic Fuller rose beetle damage to leaves

Basic Information

Life Cycle: Fuller rose beetle, Naupactus godmani (Crotch),  adult females emerge from the ground year round, but heaviest emergence is from July-October.  There are no males.  Female beetles lay eggs under the calyx of citrus fruit and other cracks and crevices.  The neonate larvae drop to the ground and feed on roots for 6-8 months, after which they pupate and then emerge as adults the following year.  Fuller rose beetle goes by a number of names in the scientific literature including Naupactus godmani, Pantomorus cervinus (Boheman) and Asynonchus cervinus (Boheman).

Host List: Although adults will feed on the leaves of many plants, the larvae can only develop by feeding on the roots of a limited number of host plants such as citrus, berries, and roses. 

Damage: Fuller rose beetle is generally not thought of as a pest of citrus except in rare situations where it feeds on the new leaves of recently topworked trees.  However, it can be of great concern for export countries that do not have this pest.  Loads of fruit found to contain a single viable egg mass are subject to fumigation or rejection. 

Distribution: Throughout California citrus.

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