Solution Center for Nutrient Management
Solution Center for Nutrient Management
Solution Center for Nutrient Management
University of California
Solution Center for Nutrient Management

Posts Tagged: carbon sequestration

Biochar and Carbon Sequestration

Achieving carbon sequestration by building soil organic matter requires that carbon input rates (green arrows) exceed microbial decomposition of organic matter. Carbon dioxide is absorbed from the atmoshpere during plant photosynthesis (purple arrow). This carbon can enter the soil via plant roots, or when plant residues are added to the soil. Soil amendments containing carbon, such as compost or biochar, can also serve as carbon inputs.ition (red arrow).

Sequestering Carbon in the Soil Using Biochar Soils store three times more carbon than exists in the atmosphere. Plants absorb atmospheric carbon during photosynthesis, so the return of plant residues into the soil contributing to soil carbon. While much of this carbon ultimately returns to the atmosphere as soil microbes decompose carbon based plant biomass and release carbon dioxide, soil carbon stores can increase if the rate of carbon inputs exceeds the rate of microbial decomposition....

Posted on Friday, September 30, 2016 at 12:12 PM
 
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