Subtropical Fruit Crops Research & Education
University of California
Subtropical Fruit Crops Research & Education

What is Pollinating that Plant?

You always wanted to know what pollinated rambutan, litchi, blueberries and all those other plants dependent on insect pollen movement?  O yes, and also what is pollinating avocado?

Insect Pollination Of Cultivated Crop Plants

by S.E. McGregor, USDA

Originally published 1976

The First and Only Virtual Beekeeping Book Updated Continuously.

Additions listed by crop and date.

This book is out-of-print, but can be found on-line at ABE Books and then you can get the images that are missing from the online version of the book

https://www.abebooks.com/servlet/SearchResults?sts=t&an=&tn=insect+pollination+of+cultivated+crop+plants&kn=&isbn=&n=100121503

 

https://www.ars.usda.gov/ARSUserFiles/20220500/OnlinePollinationHandbook.pdf

This is an old book with a lot of old information, but a lot of it is still good.  There is definitely more up-to-date information, but this is a good starting point.  For avocado, another good source, or course is AvocadoSource which also has quite a number of articles on pollination of other tree species

http://www.avocadosource.com/search.asp

Recently a group of UC Riverside researchers met to align themselves around the topic of pollination - The biology, effects, interactions of the various pollinator and pollinizers and how they are affected by our environment and how we might be able to manage them better.  The participants in this pollination group have all manner of expertise and hopefully their interaction will bring a synergy of understanding to this very complicated subject.

Photos:  Syrphid (hover) fly, bumblebee, honeybee, thrips carrying pollen

Posted on Wednesday, October 11, 2017 at 6:15 AM
Tags: beetles (3), biocontrol (6), nectar (4), pollen (5), pollination (11), pollinators (9), pollinizers (2)

Comments:

1.
I recently met Gordon Frankie and learned of his findings related to avocado pollinators, and it has excited me so much. I'm sure you know him; he said he's been doing work in groves in Ventura County.  
 
My grove in San Diego County is very small, and I've always wanted to avoid renting honeybee hives. I've started putting in some of the plants (cosmos and sunflowers, e.g.) that Frankie said our native bee species particularly like and I've seen many appearing on the flowers through the summer. I'm eager to go forward with this approach during the upcoming avocado bloom season to see if I notice any increase in fruit set.

Posted by Greg Alder on October 12, 2017 at 3:11 PM

Login to leave a comment.
 
E-mail
 
Webmaster Email: rkrason@ucdavis.edu