Center for Fire Research and Outreach
Center for Fire Research and Outreach
Center for Fire Research and Outreach
University of California
Center for Fire Research and Outreach

Center for Fire Research and Outreach at UC Berkeley

Our Mission

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The mission of the UC Berkeley Center for Fire Research and Outreach is to provide a forum for coordination on emerging research and tools regarding wildland fire in California. The center will facilitate working groups devoted to a specific field or topic of research and management that relates to fire. The Center also addresses areas with Mediterranean climates world-wide. Learn More

CFRO News

11/30 - Study Finds Surprising Culprit Drives Forest Fire Behavior

Temperatures are rising and forest fires, already larger and more frequent than the historical norm, are projected to increase dramatically with anthropogenic warming. But a study released last week found an influence on past fire activity even greater than climate: human beings. The way humans have used land in the Sierra has had more effect on fire behavior than climate change.

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11/16 - U.S. federal fire and forest policy: emphasizing resilience in dry forests

Current U.S. forest fire policy emphasizes short-term outcomes versus long-term goals. This perspective drives managers to focus on the protection of high-valued resources, whether ecosystem-based or developed infrastructure, at the expense of forest resilience. Given these current and future challenges posed by wildland fire and because the U.S. Forest Service spent >50% of its budget on fire suppression in 2015, a review and reexamination of existing policy is warranted. One of the most difficult challenges to revising forest fire policy is that agency organizations and decision making processes are not structured in ways to ensure that fire management is thoroughly considered in management decisions.

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11/7 - Let It Burn: The Forest Service Wants to Stop Putting Out Some Fires

California’s fire season hasn’t turned out to be as bad as some feared this year. Stephens says today there’s actually a fire deficit.

Sierra Nevada forests are adapted to low-intensity fires that clear the underbrush and prevent trees from getting too dense. After a century of fire suppression, many forests are overgrown, which can make catastrophic fires worse.

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