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UC Master Gardener Volunteers in Los Angeles County offer workshops and other events to help educate the public about the disease, its spread, and how to select and care for fruit trees. If you’d like to schedule a workshop or event in Los Angeles County, contact Master Gardener Special Project Coordinator Sara Harris at srharris@ucanr.edu.

Do you need advice about the pest, disease and tree care? Contact your Local UC Master Gardener Program for advice:

Los Angeles County: http://celosangeles.ucanr.edu/UC_Master_Gardener_Program/

Orange County: http://mgorange.ucanr.edu/

Riverside County: https://ucanr.edu/sites/RiversideMG/

San Bernardino County: http://mgsb.ucanr.edu/

Ventura County: https://ucanr.edu/sites/VCMG/ 

 

 

 

Eat More Fruit for Better Health

Jujubes Pomegranates Figs_INRA, Jean Weber
Jujubes Pomegranates Figs_INRA, Jean Weber

Fruit for Better Health. Adding fruit trees to your garden can improve your family’s health, since the fruit you harvest will be full of fiber and vitamins. People who eat more fruits and vegetables as part of an overall healthy eating style are likely to have a reduced risk of some chronic diseases. Try new ways of adding fruit to your diet. Dried fruit makes a great snack. Apples, figs, jujubes, and persimmons can be eaten dried as well as fresh. Fruit can also be added to salads. Thinly sliced apples, figs, and persimmons make great additions to salads, as do pomegranate seeds. Loquats can be added to fruit salads. Fruit is a perfect addition to any meal, whole or cut up. Try a variety of different fruits to see what your family enjoys.

Here are 10 tips on how to encourage your family to eat more fruit. These are also available as a handout in English and Spanish.

  1. Keep visible reminders. Keep a bowl of whole fruit on the table, counter, or in the refrigerator.
  1. Experiment with flavor. Buy fresh fruits in season when they may be less expensive and at their peak flavor. Use fruits to sweeten a recipe instead of adding sugar.
  1. Think about variety. Buy fruits that are dried, frozen, and canned (in water or 100% juice) as well as fresh, so that you always have a supply on hand.
  1. Don’t forget the fiber. Make most of your choices whole or cut-up fruit, rather than juice, for the benefits that dietary fiber provides.
  1. Include fruit at breakfast. At breakfast, top your cereal with bananas, peaches, or strawberries; add blueberries to pancakes; drink 100% orange or grapefruit juice. Or, try a fruit mixed with fat-free or low-fat yogurt.
  1. Try fruit at lunch. At lunch, pack a tangerine, banana, or grapes to eat or choose fruits from a salad bar. Individual containers of fruits like peaches or applesauce are easy to carry and convenient for lunch.
  1. Enjoy fruit at dinner too! At dinner, add crushed pineapple to coleslaw or include orange sections, dried cranberries, or grapes in a tossed salad. Try fruit salsa on top of fish.
  1. Snack on fruits. Fruits make great snacks. Try dried fruits mixed with nuts or whole fruits like apples. They are easy to carry and store well.
  1. Be a good role model. Set a good example for children by eating fruit every day with meals or as snacks.
  1. Keep fruits safe. Rinse fruits before preparing or eating them. Under clean, running water, rub fruits briskly to remove dirt and surface microorganisms. After rinsing, dry with a clean towel.