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IWP FAQ

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FAQs about the Integrated Web Platform (IWP)

Does the IWP replace SiteBuilder? What technology will it use? Will it be the same as UC Davis' SiteFarm?

What is the IWP's Implementation Schedule?

How will content be organized in the IWP?

I'm the administrator/owner of a SiteBuilder site. What do I do to get ready for the migration to the IWP, and how is that going to work?

How will I manage my content going forward?

What about search authority that is established for our existing content? How will that be preserved or enhanced in the IWP?

What are the content types in the IWP?

What about older information?

Won't the IWP make the digital divide even worse?

 

Does the IWP replace SiteBuilder? What technology will it use? Will it be the same as UC Davis' SiteFarm?

  • This project will replace SiteBuilder, UC ANR's current content management system (CMS)
    • SiteBuilder was built in-house at UC ANR on the ColdFusion platform, and is hosted on servers maintained by UC ANR.
    • The SiteBuilder platform has significant gaps in functionality compared to modern content management systems.
    • In addition, as IT infrastructure, SiteBuilder is increasingly unviable. SiteBuilder requires frequent patches; ColdFusion is being retired and it is difficult to find programmers skilled in that environment. The SiteBuilder servers have frequent outages.
  • The IWP content management system will be built on the very widely used Drupal platform, with hosting and support provided by an external vendor, Pantheon, that specializes in hosting enterprise-scale Drupal sites.
  • The IWP also adds and integrates new systems, including a Customer Relationship Management (CRM) system, a web-based Digital Asset Management (DAM) system, and potentially an e-commerce platform.
  • UC ANR will not be using the UC Davis SiteFarm platform. SiteFarm is also built of Drupal, so there will be some similarities, but UC ANR is developing a distinct platform.

What is the IWP's Implementation Schedule?

  • The project has two main phases.
  • Phase 1: External (client-facing) website (July 2021 launch)
    • New content management system
      • Central content database
        • Educational content (see "Content types" below for more information on what we mean by "educational content")
        • Promotional content
        • Events
      • Customer Relationship Management system
      • Digital Asset Management system
      • Templated sites
      • Phase 2: Internal-facing (UC ANR employees) website and tools (July 2022 launch)
        • Replacements and upgrades for the UC ANR-managed tools in the Portal (survey tool, Collaborative Tools, etc)
        • Human Resources content
        • Business Operations Center content
        • Other internal-facing content (UC ANR policies, procedures, committees etc)

How will content be organized in the IWP?

  • All educational content items will reside in a central database and will be tagged with terms from a new UC ANR-wide faceted taxonomy.
  • This information architecture will enable clientele to search and filter all of UC ANR's educational content by subject area.
    • What's a faceted taxonomy? What's filtering?
    • In addition to the main search/filter interface, the IWP will support two other main categories of sites: templated sites and custom/curated sites.
    • Templated sites
      • Templates will be used primarily for UCCE county offices and county-based 4-H and Master Gardener sites.
      • All sites will have a common style and convey the same categories of information — local calendar items, posts to the local blog, etc.
      • Within the template, local administrators will be able to curate content — e.g. by presenting relevant educational content.
        • Educational content items will reside in the central database and can be "published" to a templated site.
    • Custom/curated sites
      • Program and topical sites will be developed on a case-by-case basis in partnership with IT. As "early adopters" build out these sites, they can serve as examples for others with similar content needs.
      • The process for developing a site will be in some ways similar to working in SiteBuilder: the site owner controls the text on the site and organizational elements like page structure and navigation.
      • A core difference will be that items of educational content will be added to the central database and tagged with terms from the faceted taxonomy; content items can then be published to a custom/curated site(s). A content item may be published on many sites – the key is that all of those sites are pulling the same content item from the database.

I'm the administrator/owner of a SiteBuilder site. What do I do to get ready for the migration to the IWP, and how is that going to work?

  • In general: First, prioritize your content and think about what you want to migrate to the new platform.
    • Six questions to consider as you think about your content:
      • Who is your audience? Be specific, but also think broadly (who are you reaching now vs. who you'd like to reach; potential new audiences, audiences outside California, etc)
      • What do you know about what motivates your audience?
      • What are their priority information needs and interests?
      • In what form do they want/prefer that information?
      • Which existing material best fills those needs?
      • Which gaps should we fill first in terms of topic information and form of information?
    • If you have Google Analytics enabled, look at your usage statistics and use that information, along with your understanding of your audience, to evaluate what content to migrate to the IWP.
    • Review the content in all blogs you manage.
      • Tag any blog posts that you would like to migrate to the IWP using the tagging tools in the blog system.
      • Delete obsolete posts that you do not want to migrate.
    • Thinking carefully about what information is most important to migrate, and what best serves your audience, can save you effort during the migration process and result in a cleaner and more useful web presence in the new platform.
  • If you are a county site administrator, see below for the implementation plan for counties. Other site owners: Contact Jon Wilson to schedule a time to meet with his team about your content needs and prioritization strategy using the intake survey.
  • County site administrators
    • Each county site now includes an initial guide to the migration process. The view that site, enter into your browser the URL for your county site homepage followed by "?iwp". (e.g. http://cesandiego.ucanr.edu/?iwp). These pages provide up-to-date information on the migration and template development processes.
    • If interested, you can be an "early adopter" and work with UC ANR IT on the development of the county site templates over coming months (contact Jon Wilson to engage with that process, or register content with the intake survey).
    • Once the initial template and pilot sites have been completed, IT will demonstrate them to all other county offices. Then, county site administrators will work with IT to populate county template with priority content and refine things as the process continues. The timetable for these steps is currently uncertain — we will provide updates here.
    • The process will be similar for administrators of County Master Gardener and County 4-H sites; more information to come on those.

How will I manage my content going forward?

  • The new content management tools are currently being configured in the new Drupal platform.
  • Prior to launch, IT will train content managers on the new tools.
  • After launch, content management will shift to the new tools.

What about search authority that is established for our existing content? How will that be preserved or enhanced in the IWP?

  • Existing links will be supported using permanent redirects (301 status code — tells the web crawlers that the content has been permanently moved).
  • After we launch, we'll be doing proper Search Engine Optimization for all content — accompanying our content with structured data that web crawlers expect to see. This will help all of our content to be more discoverable and all-around greater authority.

What are the content types in the IWP?

  • The IWP will allow users to filter by content type.
  • Each content type in the IWP will have a common set of characteristics — e.g. a title, a list of authors, a short section of summary text, common styles for headings and body text, etc.
  • The supported content types will continue to evolve.
  • Current proposed list of content types:
    • Promotional / ANR content
      • News articles
      • Annual reports (county and ANR)
      • Brochures
      • Planning / Vision docs
    • Articles/Publications (topical, durable, reliable content)
      • Books (e.g. production manuals)
      • Extension articles (includes formal peer-reviewed 8000-series publications, as well as shorter high-quality extension information)
      • Pest Notes
      • Pest Management Guidelines
      • Fact Sheets
      • Newsletters
      • Evergreen blog posts (e.g. years-old blog post on No see'ums still gets heavy traffic)
      • Presentations
      • California Agriculture articles
    • Tools
      • Decision Support Tools(WUCOLS, IPM tools, Cal Fish Finder)
      • Mapping Tools
    • Online learning modules/course
    • Maps/geo resources
    • Calendar events
    • Blog posts (blog posts should be timely, thematic newsletters). Educational content should instead be developed as an "Article" (see above). Use a blog post to point to that content again and again when it is timely/relevant.
    • Videos
    • Podcasts
    • Other audio content (e.g. recording of lecture, sound from the field)

What about older information?

  • A lot of older information is still in high demand and of great value. Key information in this older category will likely be picked up with existing user statistics. Other potentially high quality information will be identified and migrated over time.

Won't the IWP make the digital divide even worse?

  • This question is a good point to raise (i.e., will people who might not have Internet access be even more disadvantaged?).
  • Actually, however, the IWP will help us span the divide. The IWP gets our "best" practical and latest educational information into a single readily-accessible location. Then - for non-connected audiences - our people (or others who do have access) can access that information on the IWP (where they can easily find it) and then package and deliver it in alternate forms that are most relevant to the (non-wifi connected) audiences that they are trying to reach. In summary, there is a single location (our web) where we can find our latest and best information. Then it can be shared from there in other forms.