Subtropical Fruit Crops Research & Education
University of California
Subtropical Fruit Crops Research & Education

What Damaged the Citrus this Winter? Frost? Herbicide?

Something hit the citrus trees of Riverside in late December 2017. Some vandal spraying herbicide? It was too widespread. It was all over town, orchards and backyards. It was on the north and east sides of trees. It didn't happen in Ventura or Santa Barbara. It probably happened to a lot of other plant species, but our correspondent had eyes only for citrus.

It sure looks like it could have been a cold, freezing wind, but on closer consultation with our Citrus Specialist, Peggy Mauk who also directs the Agricultural Operations at UC Riverside – it was the demon wind. The Satan Wind. The Santa Ana that dried out the trees that had not gotten sufficient water to cool themselves and had dried out on the windward side of the tree and orchard. Burned, in effect. This is the side of the orchard that dries out the most. It's what's called the “clothes line” effect. The margins that dry first because of the greater exposure to wind, sun and usually lower humidity. In this case, way lower. And by the time the damage was noticed a week later, the winds had been forgotten. Expect more water stress in our future.                        

citrus dieback 2
citrus dieback 2

citrus santa ana damage 1
citrus santa ana damage 1

Posted on Thursday, February 22, 2018 at 5:17 AM
Tags: citrus (300), drought (41), heat (5), lemon (92), navel (11), orange (66), Santa Ana (1), stress (10), wind (5)

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