Subtropical Fruit Crops Research & Education
University of California
Subtropical Fruit Crops Research & Education

Posts Tagged: psyllids

Santa Barbara ACP News

From

Cressida Silvers

ACP/HLB Grower Liaison

Ventura, Santa Barbara and San Luis Obispo Counties

805 284-3310

Reminder of 2019 Fall ACP Area Wide Management Schedule

September 8 - 21: Carpinteria, Summerland, Montecito

September 15 - 28: Santa Barbara, Goleta, and the rest of the county

 

Here is the University of California website on ACP monitoring techniques and management recommendations:  ucanr.edu/sites/ACP/Grower_Options/Grower_Management/

If you are restricted in your choice of materials, applications of horticultural oil can be effective.

Remember to notify beekeepers in your area before treating by contacting the County Ag Department at 805 681-5600. Get additional information about the new on-line bee registration and notification system BeeWhere at beewherecalifornia.com .

ACP continues to be difficult to find in the field. This is a good thing, and we want to keep it that way, so please keep up the good work by continuing to monitor your trees and participate in the Area Wide Management Program.

Remember, difficulty finding ACP does not mean it is not present in the orchard, or not in surrounding residential citrus. The fact that ACP adults continue to show up in yellow sticky traps throughout the south county is a reminder of this. 

 

Secretary Ross Visits Santa Barbara County

CDFA Secretary Karen Ross visited Santa Barbara County last month to hear first hand how neighboring cannabis operations are impacting existing agriculture. Several citrus growers, PCAs, applicators, and I had the honor of speaking with Secretary Ross, along with representatives from the governor's office, CDFA, and the county agricultural commissioner's office. 

 

HLB Update

The most recent map and totals for all HLB detections in the state are posted at the website maps.cdfa.ca.gov/WeeklyACPMaps/HLBWeb/HLB_Treatments.pdf.  As of August 2, a total of 1,534 trees and 256 ACP have tested positive for the HLB bacterium, on a total of 1,110 sites, all still in LA, Orange, and Riverside Counties. To date, all HLB detections have been on residential properties, the infected trees have been or are being removed, and ACP treatments applied on a recurring basis to remaining citrus in those areas. No HLB has been found in commercial groves.

Voluntary Best Practices for HLB protection

As HLB detections increase and spread, it's important to be aware of possible actions you could take to further protect your citrus should an HLB detection occur in your area. These Voluntary Best Practices can be found at the Citrus Insider website HERE.

Regulatory responses required by the state in response to an HLB detection are described in CDFA's Action Plan for ACP and HLB . 


UPCOMING CPDPC MEETINGS
 -- All meeting agendas and eventually the minutes are posted at www.cdfa.ca.gov/citruscommittee/ . All meetings are free and open to the public, and accessible via phone/webinar.  

  • Operations and Outreach Subcommittees meeting date has changed to Wed, Aug 21. Outreach agenda is here, Operations Agenda is pending.

Additional Useful Links:

Summaries of the latest scientific research on combating HLB: ucanr.edu/sites/scienceforcitrushealth/

Science-based analyses to guide policy decisions, logistics, and operations: www.datoc.us

General updates and information on the state ACP/HLB program and regional activities: citrusinsider.org 

ACP mounted
ACP mounted

Posted on Wednesday, August 14, 2019 at 6:49 AM
Tags: acp (86), area-wide spray (2), citrus (334), hlb (69), huanglongbing (66), psyllids (3)

Protect California citrus from a serious pest and disease

UCCE farm advisor Kevin Day and Tulare County farmer George McEwen looking at new growth on citrus trees.

View a four-minute video.

A tell-tale sign of spring in California is a flush of new leaf growth on citrus trees. Because the feathery light green leaves are particularly attractive to Asian citrus psyllids (ACP), the leaves' emergence marks a critical time to determine whether the pest has infested trees.

“We encourage home citrus growers and farmers to go out with a magnifying glass or hand lens and look closely at the new growth,” said Beth Grafton-Cardwell, UC Agriculture and Natural Resources (UC ANR) citrus entomologist. “Look for the various stages of the psyllid – small yellow eggs, sesame-seed sized yellow ACP young with curly white tubules, or aphid-like adults that perch with their hind quarters angled up.”

Pictures of the Asian citrus psyllids and its life stages are on the UC ANR website at http://ucanr.edu/acp. If you find signs of the insect, call the California Food and Agriculture (CDFA) Exotic Pest Hotline at (800) 491-1899.

Asian citrus psyllids are feared because they can spread huanglongbing (HLB) disease, an incurable condition that first causes yellow mottling on the leaves and later sour, misshapen fruit before killing the tree. ACP, native of Pakistan, Afghanistan and other tropical and subtropics regions of Asian, was first detected in California in 2008. Everywhere Asian citrus psyllids have appeared – including Florida and Texas – the pests have found and spread the disease. A few HLB-infected trees have been located in urban Los Angeles County. They were quickly removed by CDFA officials.

“In California, we are working hard to keep the population of ACP as low as possible until researchers can find a cure for the disease,” Grafton-Cardwell said. “We need the help of citrus farmers and home gardeners.”

Grafton-Cardwell has spearheaded the development of the UC ANR ACP website for citrus growers and citrus homeowners that provides help in finding the pest and what to do next. The site has an interactive map tool to locate residences and farms that are in areas where the psyllid has already become established, and areas where they are posing a risk to the citrus industry and must be aggressively treated by county officials.

The website outlines biological control efforts that are underway, and directions for insecticidal control, if it is needed. An online calculator on the website allows farmers and homeowners to determine their potential costs for using insecticides.

There are additional measures that can be taken to support the fight against ACP and HLB in California.

  • When planting new citrus trees, only purchase the trees from reputable nurseries. Do not accept tree cuttings or budwood from friends or relatives.
  • After pruning or cutting down a citrus tree, dry out the green waste or double bag it to make sure that live psyllids won't ride into another region on the foliage.
  • Control ants in and near citrus trees with bait stations. Scientists have released natural enemies of ACP in Southern California to help keep the pest in check. However, ants will protect ACP from the natural enemies. Ants favor the presence of ACP because the psyllid produces honeydew, a food source for ants.
  • Learn more about the Asian citrus psyllid and huanglongbing disease by reading the detailed pest note on UC ANR's Statewide Integrated Pest Management website.
  • Assist in the control of ACP by supporting CDFA insecticide treatments of your citrus or treating the citrus yourself when psyllids are present.
  • Support the removal of HLB-infected trees. 

Spanish version.

 

Posted on Wednesday, March 9, 2016 at 9:13 AM
Tags: ACP (86), Asian citrus psyllid (57), citrus (334), greening (10), HLB (69), huanglongbing (66), psyllids (3)

A New Psyllid Trap

Scientists at the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services have developed a “SmartTrap” using 3D printing technology to more efficiently catch and study the Asian citrus psyllid, the vector of citrus greening.

A five-year, $200,000 National Institute of Food and Agriculture grant awarded to Florida will allow the traps to be deployed and tested in California and Texas to prevent a similar crisis.

“This 3D printing innovation gives our scientists the best chance to find a game-changing breakthrough in the fight against citrus greening,” said Florida Commissioner of Agriculture Adam Putnam.

The current trapping method is a yellow sticky tape that passively accumulates all sorts of insects including dirt, making them difficult to read.  The new trap specifically traps psyllids.  At the moment there will be limited distribution of the traps for testing purposes, so the sticky tape will still be the main method of monitoring psyllids.

ACP traps
ACP traps

Posted on Tuesday, February 24, 2015 at 5:27 PM
Tags: ACP (86), greening (10), huanglongbing (66), psyllids (3), traps (2)
 
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