Subtropical Fruit Crops Research & Education
University of California
Subtropical Fruit Crops Research & Education

Posts Tagged: water

Citrus? Water? How Do They Go Together?

Advances in Citrus Water Use

                         Workshop & Field Day

Tuesday, March 26, 2019

8 Am - 3 PM

Strathmore, CA

 

Attend the Advances in Citrus Water Use Workshop & Field Day and join UC Davis Irrigation Specialist Daniele Zaccaria as well as other water experts and specialists from the University of California Cooperative Extension, the California Department of Water Resources, and the Citrus Research Board to learn about research advances in water use and irrigation for citrus production. Gain firsthand practical knowledge of the latest developments in the citrus industry and become familiar with methods and tools to measure evapotranspiration (ET) and crop coefficients (Kc), tree water status, and monitor soil moisture to inform irrigation planning and scheduling decisions for citrus. 

 

What to expect?

Session topics include:

  • Current research
  • Water management and regulation
  • Optional Field Session on irrigation technology

View a tentative agenda here.

 

 

Registration Details

 

$35 registration fee includes admission to the field day, coffee, refreshments, and lunch.

 

 

 

Register online, here. Fee will increase on March 13.

 

 

Limited to the first 150 participants

 

 

Logistics and Registration

ANR Program Support, Julia Kalika, (530) 750-1380 or Shannon Martin, (530) 750-1328

citrus cornucopia
citrus cornucopia

Posted on Friday, March 8, 2019 at 1:44 PM
Tags: citrus (304), irrigation (75), water (47)

Water is Life and Watering Citrus is Critical - Come Learn

Advances in Citrus Water Use

               Workshop & Field Day

Tuesday, March 26, 2019

8:00 AM-3:00 PM

Strathmore, California

Register NOW!!!

 https://ucanr.edu/sites/citrusfieldday/Registration/

About the Field Day

 

Attend the Advances in Citrus Water Use Workshop & Field Day and join UC Davis Irrigation Specialist Daniele Zaccaria as well as other water experts and specialists from the University of California Cooperative Extension, the California Department of Water Resources, and the Citrus Research Board to learn about research advances in water use and irrigation for citrus production. Gain firsthand practical knowledge of the latest developments in the citrus industry and become familiar with methods and tools to measure evapotranspiration (ET) and crop coefficients (Kc), tree water status, and monitor soil moisture to inform irrigation planning and scheduling decisions for citrus. 

 

What to expect?

Session topics include:

  • Current research
  • Water management and regulation
  • Optional Field Session on irrigation technology

View a tentative agenda here.

Registration Details

$35 registration fee includes admission to the field day, coffee, refreshments, and lunch.

 

Register online, here. Fee will increase on March 13.

 

Limited to the first 150 participants.

Contacts for More Information

 

Logistics and Registration

ANR Program Support, Julia Kalika, (530) 750-1380 or Shannon Martin, (530) 750-1328.

 

Course Content 

Daniele Zaccaria, UC Cooperative Extension Specialist, Agricultural Water Management

 

citrus cornucopia
citrus cornucopia

Posted on Friday, March 8, 2019 at 1:26 PM
Tags: citrus (304), field day (4), irrigation (75), water (47)

What’s Up with my Avocado Tree?

So a question comes in about a problem with a backyard avocado tree.  And it would seem the first question would be about the overgrowth happening at the base of the trunk.  This a ‘Fuerte' avocado that is grafted on a seedling avocado rootstock.  It's not unusual to see an overgrowth, but this is the most extreme example I have ever seen.  So it's basically an incompatibility between the graft and the rootstock.  In many cases this is no big problem and trees can live a long time, as this tree has.

But the homeowner wasn't asking about the unusual growth at the base, but the canker that had appeared in the center of the trunk near the base.

This has the classic white sugar exudate that occurs with a wound of any kind in avocado.  The sugary sap that contains the unusual mannoheptulose 7-carbon sugar characteristic of the laurel family to which avocado belongs will ooze out of the wound and result in a white crust (Read more about this sugar at: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0254629911001372 ).

Anyway, so this backyard tree is in an area that is getting 10 minutes of lawn watering a day.  Lawns and avocados don't get along.  And avocados don't get along with short, shallow irrigation that result in salt accumulating in the root zone. Which is what has happened here.  Salt stress and the result is an infection of bacterial canker (https://ucanr.edu/blogs/blogcore/postdetail.cfm?postnum=7920 ).  

It's not fatal in an old tree like this, but it can predispose the tree to root rot. And that's not something that is easy to treat in backyard settings.

Posted on Monday, March 4, 2019 at 5:56 AM
Tags: avocado (272), bacterial canker (2), stress (10), water (47)

Frost and Rain?

It is that time of year and we should be alert to threat of freezing weather and damage to trees. Last winter was one of the warmest on record, but there was still a sneak cold blast around December 25 that caused some problems in some areas. Wet winters tend to have lower frost threats, and even though wet is forecast for this winter, the forecast is erratic, as usual. That still leaves January which historically is when most of our damaging frosts occur. Fox Weather on the CA Avocado Commission is forecasting some cold weather coming up, so growers need to be prepared for the worst.

http://www.californiaavocadogrowers.com/articles/30-day-weather-outlook-december-7-2015-january-7-2015

 

Here are some links to frost information, preparing for frost and managing frost damage to trees.

A Frost Primer

http://ceventura.ucanr.edu/Com_Ag/Subtropical/Publications/Frost/A_Frost_Primer_-_2002_/

Methods of Frost Protection

http://ceventura.ucanr.edu/Com_Ag/Subtropical/Avocado_Handbook/Frost_Control_Freeze_Damage_/Methods_of_Frost_Protection_/


Protecting Avocados from Frost

http://ceventura.ucanr.edu/Com_Ag/Subtropical/Avocado_Handbook/Frost_Control_Freeze_Damage_/Protecting_Avocados_from_Frost_/


Rehabilitation of Freeze-Damaged Citrus and Avocado Trees

http://ceventura.ucanr.edu/Com_Ag/Subtropical/Avocado_Handbook/Frost_Control_Freeze_Damage_/Rehabilitation_of_Freeze-Damaged_Citrus_and_Avocado_Trees_/

The forecast is for north winds, which often means cold, dry air and often with winds. Winds mean no inversion and no warm air that can be introduced at ground level to warm trees. If this occurs, running a wind machine can make the damage worse. Wind machines and orchard heaters work on the principle of mixing that warmer air higher up – 20-100 or so feet higher than ground level which has colder air. When temperatures drop, the air is dry (wet-bulb temp below 28 deg F) and there is no inversion, running a wind machine can just stir up cold air and cause worse conditions (freeze-drying). It's better to not run the machine. The only thing left to do is to run the microsprinklers during the day so that the water can absorb the day's heat. Then turn the water off before sunset so that evaporative cooling from the running water isn't accentuated. Then when temperatures drop near 32 at night and the dewpoint is much below that, it's time to start the water again and let it run until sunrise (when risk is less). Running water works even if the water freezes. This is due to the release of heat when water goes from liquid to frozen state. This 1-2 degrees can mean the difference between frost damage and no damage. Also, ice on fruit and leaves can insulate the fruit. As the ice melts at the surface of the plant, it releases heat, protecting the plants. If there is not sufficient water to run the whole orchard, it's best to pick out the irrigation blocks that are the coldest or the ones you definitely want to save and run the water there continuously. Running the water and turning it off during the night to irrigate another block can lead to colder temperatures in both blocks.

 

Keep warm this winter.

and check out this Wind Machine You Tube:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rwTJveN8cIE

Wind Machine frost
Wind Machine frost

Posted on Wednesday, January 9, 2019 at 4:46 PM
Tags: avocado (272), citrus (304), frost (17), irrigation (75), water (47), wind (5)

Soil Moisture/Nitrogen Workshop


Irrigation and Nutrient Management Field Day


Monday January 14, 2019
555 Las Varas Canyon Road Goleta 7:30 am - 11:30 pm, lunch is provided The event is FREE

but please register -

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/irrigation-nutrient-management-field-day-tickets-54248292102



Learn all about soil moisture sensor systems -
•     Using sensors to save water, energy, & fertilizer
•     Monitoring & interpreting soil moisture data
•     Checking & fixing common system problems
•     System configurations & funding opportunities
•     Practical and common sense considerations


Attendees get a
FREE Soil Nitrate
Quick Test Kit



The Cachuma Resource Conservation District, with funding from the Department of Water Resources, is
pleased to offer this FREE field day event in partnership with:


Parks Land and Cattle Company The Irrometer Company
Natural Resource Conservation Service


Picture:  Soil Moisture Testing by the" Feel Method"

Posted on Monday, January 7, 2019 at 5:42 PM
Tags: soil (22), testing (4), water (47), workshop (3)

Next 5 stories | Last story

 
E-mail
 
Webmaster Email: rkrason@ucdavis.edu