ANR Employees
University of California
ANR Employees

2014 New Call for Positions

2014 URS Call for Positions

This proposal has been formally submitted for the 2014 cycle.

Position Details

123 Water Resource Economics and Policy Specialist

Proposed Location/Housing

Department of Environmental Sciences, College of Natural and Agricultural Sciences, UC Riverside

Proposed Area of Coverage

California statewide, with an emphasis in Southern California

Contacts

Associated Documents

Comments

3 Comments

1
Southern California is in desperate need of a Water Resource related specialist that can assist in policy making and providing technical support to advisors. This position will address the needs of the Water Quality, Quantity and Security Initiative in the water-limited environment of Southern California. This position can assist in the development of cost-effective water pollution regulation. For example, unrealistic bacterial TMDLs in Southern California are estimated to cost about $33 million San Diego County alone in the next few years. This position can also assist in providing options for irrigation efficiency and incentives for the adoption of best management practices in agriculture and urban agriculture. I think this position would be very successful at UC Riverside and add credibility to UCCE in Southern California.
Posted Jul 17, 2014 3:30 PM by James A. Bethke
2
We need someone who can work with the small irrigation districts in the State. What is going to happen to some is large national organizations with considerable public policy and legal expertise are going to succeed in causing these district to loose part of their historical water rights. These small district are in areas where production agriculture is most of the local economy. They need some serious public policy help even though they do not realize it.
Posted Jul 18, 2014 4:35 PM by Maxwell Norton
3
DWR has a long and enduring relationship with the UC System. DWR partners and collaborates with UC experts and colleagues in numerous water related projects. Having someone in this capacity is valuable to the DWR – He or she may support DWR’s Integrated Water Management programs, may help our outreach with stakeholders, and may expand our partnership with the UC System. My unit in particular, Economics Analysis Section, is interested in looking at the benefits and costs of water resources measures such as conservation programs, including alternative pricing mechanisms, and assessing the economic and environmental impacts of water supply and demand issues, such as water shortages (e.g., droughts) to agricultural, urban, recreational and environmental uses. We are always on the look-out for new tools, models and creative ways to understand and analyze water issues in order to better inform and support policy and decision-making in the government, and one of the ways we do that is through our partnership with the UC System. With the Water Resource Economics and Policy Specialist on board, we hope to have a better understanding and more informed analyses of the issues at hand.

I think the proposal looks great – it is well thought out and addresses the needs of the water community. However, if I can make a suggestion under “Position description” where it says, “ (a) Ph.D. in environmental and/or agricultural economics, environmental sciences, environmental management, urban planning, or a closely-related field with a background in water management and/or resource conservation is required to complement our existing UC ANR team,” I would propose to have it say “..Ph.D. in environmental and/or agricultural economics, or environmental sciences, environmental management, urban planning, or a closely-related field with a background in water management and/or resource conservation with at least one course in advanced natural resource or environmental economics.” Reason being is that some of these environmental sciences, environmental management, urban planning or water management majors won’t have a course in advanced natural resource economics or environmental economics that cover water issues in a more analytical detail (e.g. non-renewability of groundwater versus the renewability of surface water; managing water as a dynamic system, accounting for time (e.g., groundwater that is used today may not be available for future use)).

Thanks for the opportunity to comment.
Posted Jul 21, 2014 11:14 AM by Emmanuel Asinas, DWR Chief Economist

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