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ANR Employees

2016 Call for Positions

On December 14, 2016 UC ANR Vice President Humiston announced the the release of 26 CE positions from the 2016 call for a new round of hiring over the next two years. This new release continues the commitment for hiring to exceed projected turnover, thus achieving the goal of academic growth. And, as funding becomes available, UC ANR will consider additional positions.

2016 approved CE positions

January 12, 2016 solicited proposals for Cooperative Extension (CE) advisor and specialist positions in the ANR Update. The call identified positions for strengthening and expanding the UC ANR network to address programmatic gaps and emerging needs. Below this public webpage displays all 138 new CE position proposals (there is a search tool to assist in finding proposals).

The online submittal process was open from January 12 – May 5 (5:00 PM) to allow as much time as possible for internal consultation and external input from UC ANR stakeholders in all program areas. Submissions were accepted from the following official submitter groups:

The Review Phase was completed May 5 – August 1. All proposals were reviewed. The program area and unit reviews were conducted by the Program Teams; geographic groups of County/Multicounty Partnership and Research and Extension Center Directors, and the UC ANR affiliated colleges and school. These groups prioritized and provided rationale for the position proposals under their purview. This input was used to inform UC ANR Program Council’s recommendations and ultimately the UC ANR Vice President’s decisions. More information about the review process is available in the review orientation.

The public comment period was open Jan. 12 through July 11, 2016. Comments can be viewed by clicking the position links below. Comments were reviewed by the review groups, Program Council and the Vice President.

Relevant documents:

If you have any questions, contact Katherine Webb-Martinez at (510) 987-0029 or katherine.webb-martinez@ucop.edu.

 

2016 URS Call for Positions

This proposal has been formally submitted for the 2016 cycle.

Position Details

029 Area Livestock and Natural Resources Advisor - Central Sierra MCP

This advisor will serve clientele in the Central Sierra Multi-County Partnership (El Dorado, Amador, Calaveras and Tuolumne counties) with a general disciplinary focus on livestock production systems including grazing management, pasture management, nutrition, herd health, animal husbandry, genetic selection, reproduction, and marketing. The successful applicant will have a minimum of an MS degree in animal science, range management or a closely related field.  Ideally the applicant will have one degree in animal science and one degree in range management or have the minimum course work to be a Certified Rangeland Manager. This position will report to the Central Sierra Multi-County Partnership (MCP) Director and will interact internally with the UC Davis Dept of Animal Science and the following ANR Program Teams; Meat Production and Food Safety, and Forest and Rangeland Systems. These teams help coordinate the range, livestock production and natural resources research and education activities of more than 40 CE advisors, CE specialists and AES researchers.

Livestock production continues to be one of the leading agricultural commodities in the region. Livestock production is the number one agricultural commodity in both Tuolumne and Calaveras counties and rank second in both El Dorado and Amador counties. The majority of livestock is cattle, with goats, sheep, poultry and swine also being represented. Nearly all the cattle produced in the region is comprised of cow/calf operations which operate on a complex and diverse land ownership basis. Livestock production on annual rangelands account for 800,000 acres in the region and is mostly private ownership that is either owner operated or leased.  A portion of the annual rangeland is publicly owned either by Federal, State or local government and a number of utility districts. In addition to annual range, many livestock producers utilize forestlands for summer grazing. The Stanislaus and El Dorado National Forests account for 589,000 acres of grazing land with an additional 168,000 acres of private forestland used for grazing. A number of producers also utilize irrigated and non-irrigated pastures in other parts of California or out of state. As a result of the diversity in ecosystems and magnitude of acreage and diversity of ownership, the issues that arise in this production system are just as varied and diverse.

For the full Position Justification (2 pages) see the below link under Associated Documents.

Proposed Location/Housing

Central Sierra MCP - serving El Dorado, Amador, Calaveras and Tuolumne counties. Position will be housed in Tuolumne.

Proposed Area of Coverage

Central Sierra MCP - serving El Dorado, Amador, Calaveras and Tuolumne counties

Contacts

Associated Documents

Comments

10 Comments

1
As stated in the position details, livestock production continues to be one of the leading agricultural commodities in the foothill region. Recent years have seen a significant increase in water quality issues with new regulations and proposals for surface and groundwater protection which are targeting livestock producers. Many of these livestock producers are having to implement specific management practices to comply with the new requirements. This position will provide critical insights and the outreach necessary to guide rangeland management in meeting the State strategies for an adequate and reliable water supply for California. The water issues in the state are only going to continue and grow and the ability to address the issues timely and with the necessary expertise provided by this position will greatly assist a vital clientele of the UC advisor system in this region.
Posted May 12, 2016 3:08 PM by Patricia Lesky
2
This position will benefit the livestock producers and landowners of the foothill region in many ways and is much needed. Land and water resources are an increasingly precious commodity and someone in place who can educate and assist producers on ways to maximize the potential of the resources available to them would be a benefit to foothill communities both economically and ecologically.
Posted May 20, 2016 4:05 PM by Spencer Tregilgas
3
Livestock production in these 4 counties ranks at or near the top in terms of county ag production. In addition, producers in these counties graze on a combination of private and public land. This position would serve an important constituency on a variety of important livestock and range management issues. It is a large territory with no easy way to get from north to south or east to west (especially during the winter). Having an advisor dedicated to these issues would be a tremendous benefit to the communities within the region.
Posted May 23, 2016 2:09 PM by Dan Macon
4
Livestock production ranks number one in Tuolumne County's annual crop and livestock report. The addition of an Area Livestock and Natural Resource Advisor is needed across all four counties within the Central Sierra MCP. Delivery of UC research to producers in the MCP pertinent to water quality issues associated with grazing livestock on both private and public lands is critical to address recent concerns brought forward by the State Water Board. Maintaining a viable livestock industry in Tuolumne County is important both for the County's economic well being and the management of a great portion of its open space.
Posted May 31, 2016 9:22 AM by Gary Stockel
5
I represent nearly 400 members of the Tuolumne County Farm Bureau. The addition of an Area Livestock and Natural Resource Advisor would be a huge benefit to our Livestock Producers in our County and Region. UC information and research is crucial for the long term, and continued viability of our producers. We are under constant pressure on both private and public lands in regards to grazing land availability, resource use, and environmental quality. Maintaining a viable livestock industry is not only crucial to our local economy, but crucial to maintaining working landscapes and are a draw to the thousands of tourists that come through our county as well. Thank you for the opportunity to comment.
Posted Jun 13, 2016 7:24 AM by Shaun Crook
6
The impact an Area Livestock and Natural Resources Advisor would have on our 4-county region cannot be overstated. The demand in our area is greater than ever for science-based expertise and support like what is available through the UCCE system. Currently, there are no livestock or animal science advisors in the Central Sierra region yet livestock production is the leading agricultural commodity in Tuolumne and Calaveras counties and second in Amador and El Dorado counties. Due to the lack of this type of position in the region, local livestock producers are forced to work with advisors who are unfamiliar with the unique concerns of living in our rural community. This position would bring scientific and land management education to our livestock producers and local community and would enable livestock producers in the 4-county region to receive scientific information and resources that are relevant to their specific needs. This position would also provide crucial expertise on the important local issue of land owner and water resource cooperation.
Posted Jun 22, 2016 9:04 AM by Karl Rodefer, Chair, Tuolumne County Board of Supervisors
7
As a Christmas tree grower and rancher in Tuolumne County for over 40 years I have called upon the expertise of the UCCE staff on multiple occasions and always been pleased with the support and advice that I have received. Having an adequate number of ag experts in the field to personally assist and advise farmers and ranchers is equally as important to our state's agricultural productivity as the research work that is done at UC Davis and the field stations. I know that the Central Sierra MCP is currently underrepresented in UCCE positions and that this Livestock/Natural Resource Advisor would add greatly to the resources available to our ag community and be much appreciated.
Posted Jul 5, 2016 12:27 PM by Don Moore
8
I am writing on behalf of the Amador Farm Bureau to support the Central Sierra region Area Livestock Advisor position. Livestock production continues to be one of the leading agricultural commodities in the region. Livestock production is the number one agricultural commodity in both Tuolumne and Calaveras counties and rank second in both El Dorado and Amador counties. The majority of livestock is cattle, with goats, sheep, poultry and swine also being represented. Nearly all the cattle produced in the region is comprised of cow/calf operations which operate on a complex and diverse land ownership basis. Livestock production on annual rangelands account for 800,000 acres in the region and is mostly private ownership that is either owner operated or leased. A portion of the annual rangeland is publicly owned either by Federal, State or local government and a number of utility districts. In addition to annual range, many livestock producers utilize forestlands for summer grazing. The Stanislaus and El Dorado National Forests account for 589,000 acres of grazing land with an additional 168,000 acres of private forestland used for grazing. A number of producers also utilize irrigated and non-irrigated pastures in other parts of California or out of state. As a result of the diversity in ecosystems and magnitude of acreage and diversity of ownership, the issues that arise in this production system are just as varied and diverse. Our industry relies on the expertise delivered by UCCE. Currently the Central Sierra region is underrepresented in UCCE positions. This position is critical to our member’s ability to meet the challenges we face in emerging issues, agricultural productivity, and sustainable production of our crops. We fully support this position and would look forward to working with the individual hired.
Posted Jul 6, 2016 8:23 AM by Jim Spinetta
9
The history of the Amador RCD has been heavily involved in assisting local livestock producers and we continue to work with this group of agricultural producers in many areas that this position would complement. Keeping livestock production as a viable resource management option for the foothill area will ensure that urban development does not take over areas where watershed protection is critical for California's future. Livestock producers need technical assistance to keep their operations economically viable. This important position will complement the efforts of the RCD and NRCS.
Posted Jul 6, 2016 10:11 AM by Steve Q. Cannon
10
As a cattle rancher based in El Dorado County with two Grazing Allotments serviced by the US Forest Service, I concur with the previous comments endorsing the selection of a Livestock Specialist for the Central Sierra.
I would like to offer a different but mutually beneficial reason why our counties should be selected for this position.
Over the past 20 years or so, most of El Dorado County's growth has come from people who have chose to live in our county and commute to Sacramento or Folsom to work. These people have decided to endure a daily commute to work in order to live, play, and raise their families in a rural atmosphere..
Of course, some of the folks already living here see this growth as a threat to their own enjoyment of a rural lifestyle. And so the battle lines are set: Stasis vs. inevitability. The outcome is given, the impact is not. That is an important fact to stress: the impact is not preordained. Growth itself need not diminish the role of agriculture and its impact on the rural nature of the county.
Here is why. These recent arrivals want to connect to agriculture in a non-commercial manner and expose their children to its value. The resurrection and growth of 4H clubs and a vibrant FFA club, coupled with a tremendous increase in the number of animals competing at our fair are two examples of this trend. Another is the growing interest in the manner which food is grown. Provenance is important. People want a direct and personal relationship with what they eat. They are raising animals to eat and milk, for health choices, to diminish fire danger and, yes, as pets. This is coming from people with no previous connection to agriculture, people who could benefit most from a respected and independent source. Properly supported and nurtured, this could create new markets and alter public perceptions of agriculture..
The rest of our foothill counties are facing the same issue of growth. Can we nurture newcomers agricultural interests?
Posted Jul 11, 2016 3:25 PM by Chuck Bacchi, Member El Dorado County Agricultural Commission, Board Member, El Dorado County Farm Bureau

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