ANR Employees
University of California
ANR Employees

2016 Call for Positions

On December 14, 2016 UC ANR Vice President Humiston announced the the release of 26 CE positions from the 2016 call for a new round of hiring over the next two years. This new release continues the commitment for hiring to exceed projected turnover, thus achieving the goal of academic growth. And, as funding becomes available, UC ANR will consider additional positions.

2016 approved CE positions

January 12, 2016 solicited proposals for Cooperative Extension (CE) advisor and specialist positions in the ANR Update. The call identified positions for strengthening and expanding the UC ANR network to address programmatic gaps and emerging needs. Below this public webpage displays all 138 new CE position proposals (there is a search tool to assist in finding proposals).

The online submittal process was open from January 12 – May 5 (5:00 PM) to allow as much time as possible for internal consultation and external input from UC ANR stakeholders in all program areas. Submissions were accepted from the following official submitter groups:

The Review Phase was completed May 5 – August 1. All proposals were reviewed. The program area and unit reviews were conducted by the Program Teams; geographic groups of County/Multicounty Partnership and Research and Extension Center Directors, and the UC ANR affiliated colleges and school. These groups prioritized and provided rationale for the position proposals under their purview. This input was used to inform UC ANR Program Council’s recommendations and ultimately the UC ANR Vice President’s decisions. More information about the review process is available in the review orientation.

The public comment period was open Jan. 12 through July 11, 2016. Comments can be viewed by clicking the position links below. Comments were reviewed by the review groups, Program Council and the Vice President.

Relevant documents:

If you have any questions, contact Katherine Webb-Martinez at (510) 987-0029 or katherine.webb-martinez@ucop.edu.

 

2016 URS Call for Positions

This proposal has been formally submitted for the 2016 cycle.

Position Details

054 Area Viticulture Advisor - San Joaquin County

The advisor would be primarily responsible for developing a research and extension education program to address high priority production issues in wine and table grapes in San Joaquin County, including pest, disease and water management.  San Joaquin County is the statewide and national leader in wine grape production acreage.  Sub-regional planning discussions have identified possible near-term retirements and realignments that could eventuate in this position becoming a regional viticulture advisor in the Northern San Joaquin Valley.  

The proposed viticulture advisor would represent the largest wine grape producing area in California and the nation.  San Joaquin County is home to 105,000 acres of wine grapes (20% of California’s production), 1,000 acres of table grapes, and 3,000 acres of blueberries and caneberries.  These commodities are produced on over 750 diversified, mostly family-owned farms, supporting 85 local wineries and staff.  The five largest wineries in California have vineyards in San Joaquin County. The advisor would also serve an allied pest management industry of more than 100 pest control advisors, a large and important secondary clientele group.  

 

Proposed Location/Housing

San Joaquin County

Proposed Area of Coverage

Northern San Joaquin Valley

Contacts

Associated Documents

Comments

24 Comments

1
San Joaquin county wine grape production is ever increasing in importance as a value to the overall economy of San Joaquin County and not just the agricultural production sector of the county's economy. By having an area viticulture farm advisor in place, that will help ensure that the wine grape growers will have excellent local support from a local county office. Keeping strategic farm advisors in place in key counties will be critical for the public's perception of value of the UCCE farm advisor system. If San Joaquin County, which according to the 2015 wine grape production report has the most acres of wine grapes in the state of California, were to be void a Viticulture farm advisor, I believe the public would not feel the UCCE System is properly prioritizing and representing them.
Posted Jun 29, 2016 11:08 AM by Ben Duesterhaus
2
The California Association of Winegrape Growers supports strongly the establishment and funding of an Area Viticulture Advisor Position for San Joaquin County.

The position announcement describes well the importance of the winegrape industry in San Joaquin County, which is home to 105,000 acres of winegrapes (20% of California’s production), which in turn supports 85 local wineries and staff. The five largest wineries in California have vineyards in San Joaquin County. San Joaquin County is uniquely positioned in its ability to produce a wide diversity of winegrape varietals to meet the demands of many different wine programs seeking quality winegrapes at various price points.

Winegrape growers in San Joaquin County have a well established track record for supporting viticulture research and extension. Current San Joaquin County Advisor Paul Verdegaal, who is retiring in 2017, is a recognized leader in promoting the continual improvement of winegrape production practices and systems for San Joaquin County growers. He has made a very significant contribution to the Lodi region's success and his pending retirement makes the quick hire of a new Advisor a critically important priority for area growers.
Posted Jul 5, 2016 5:21 PM by John Aguirre, President California Association of Winegrape Growers
3
On behalf of the Lodi District Grape Growers Association (LDGGA) and our grower and associated business members, I strongly support filling the position of San Joaquin County Area Viticulture Advisor as current Advisor Paul Verdegaal will soon retire. LDGGA has historically supported and will continue to support the research and extension activities of our local Viticulture Advisor.
With over 105,000 acres of wine grapes, San Joaquin County is the largest wine grape producing county in the state. San Joaquin County grape growers have relied on the expertise of our UCCE viticulture advisors as the area has evolved from a handpick Tokay table grape region to a mechanized premium wine grape region. Much of the Lodi district’s success can be attributed to the strength of the relationship between growers and the Cooperative Extension. It is vital that this local resource is available to future growers, as well as established growers, seeking research-based guidance in areas such as pest and water management, vineyard development, and production efficiency.
The unique resources of an Area Viticulture Advisor are needed now more than ever as growers face increasing demands from environmental regulation, invasive pests, increased cost of production, and changing consumer markets. The Lodi area is uniquely positioned to produce high quality wine grapes at various price points and with the support of the UCCE this region will continue to grow and prosper.
Posted Jul 6, 2016 7:43 AM by Amy Blagg, Executive Director Lodi District Grape Growers Association
4
The Lodi District Chamber of Commerce and the San Joaquin County Cooperative Extension have a long history in partnering together. In 2017, this partnership will be holding the 65th Annual Grape Day here in Lodi. The viticulture farm advisor in San Joaquin County has been instrumental in providing a half day seminar to nearly 400 growers and wine industry leaders. This half day seminar educates our growers through research projects that have been conducted over the years in San Joaquin County and the Lodi region.
For example, this past February the Lodi Grape Day the agenda included the following topics: Evaluation of High Cordon Machine Pruned Trellis with Three Standard Trellis Systems in Cabernet Sauvignon by Paul Verdegaal, farm advisor for San Joaquin County; Management of Grapevine Trunk Diseases by Kendra Baumgartner, Plant Pathologist, USDA, UC Davis; The Story of Red Leaf Viruses in California by Dr. Deborah Golino, PhD Director, Foundation Plant Services, UC Davis;
Rootstock Research for Current and Future Options by Andy Walker, PhD, Department of LAWR, UC Davis; Vine Mealybug Control Trials in San Joaquin County by Bob Van Steenwyk, PhD, Extension Specialist Emeritus, Department of Environmental Science, Policy and Management, UC Berkeley. The day was completed by the keynote speaker Robert Koch, President and Chief Executive Officer of Wine Institute.
The San Joaquin County Lodi Region represents approximately 100,000 acres of Winegrapes and represents nearly 85 wineries. It should also be mentioned that in 2015, that the Lodi Region was selected as the Wine Region of the Year by Wine Enthusiast. This achievement is made possible through the cooperation of partnerships such as the San Joaquin County Farm Advisors, Lodi Chamber of Commerce, Lodi Winegrape Commission, growers, and wineries.
I hope that consideration is taken for the need of a viticulture advisor position in San Joaquin County.
Posted Jul 6, 2016 2:15 PM by Pat Patrick, Lodi District Chamber of Commerce
5
As a vineyard manager for 37 years at John Kautz Farms in San Joaquin County, I have had the opportunity to work with two outstanding viticulture farm advisors, Jim Kissler and Paul Verdegaal. I have worked with them on numerous research trials. One of the first was with Jim Kissler in developing different trellis and pruning systems that are currently being used by many growers today. Other trials include: weed control using only post emerge herbicides, using compost on the berms, looking at different mechanized cultivating equipment under the vines, mowing berms, using heat and hot water to control weeds, and working with post and pre-emergent herbicides.
With the advice and research done by our local farm advisor, we were able to encourage growers throughout the Lodi area to switch from flood to drip irrigation. Research and extension efforts in the areas of limiting irrigation run off, applying Nitrogen to the vine, utilizing drip irrigation, and conserving water have helped growers to comply with the current requirements of the Irrigated Lands Regulatory Program.
Currently, we have a long term project in cooperation with Farm Advisor Paul Verdegaal, in the area of controlling Eutypa Dieback in Cabernet Sauvignon. In this research trial, we are looking at two aspects. Can the trellis affect the long-term control of Eutypa Dieback? And can different pruning methods make a difference in controlling Eutypa Dieback?
I have been personally engaged with SJ County farm advisors through the San Joaquin Farm Bureau, in which along with the Cooperative Extension, recently celebrated 100 years of service. I have served with Paul Verdegaal for almost 20 years on the Lodi Winegrape Commission Research Committee. We both also serve on the Lodi Chamber of Commerce Agribusiness Committee and have worked together to plan Lodi Grape Day which is held each February.
It is vital that a viticulture farm advisor here in San Joaquin County be maintained.
Posted Jul 8, 2016 9:38 AM by Joe Valente, Vineyard Manager, Kautz Farms
6
As Agricultural Commissioner of San Joaquin County I have seen first hand the importance of the role UC viticulturist has played for the winegrape industry in the County. With ever changing regulatory changes well as emerging insect and disease pressures it is increasingly important to find a replacement for Paul Verdegaal who understands the diverse needs of the grape producers of San Joaquin County.

As the top acreage production County of wine grapes in California as well as an ever growing high quality wine industry it is even more important that we have someone to help producers make good economic and environmentally friendly decisions in a ever changing regulatory challenging climate. It is imperative that someone is appointed who can carry on and add to the important work that has been done through the relationship that UCCE has developed with individual producers as well as grower groups. Paul Verdegaal has played an important role in the development of this economically vital industry in San Joaquin County. With the influx of new growers it is even more critical that this position be refilled in order for future generations to be able to continue to carry on this vital industry.

As someone who has had the assistance of Paul in helping to make wise regulatory decisions I trully understand the importance this position plays in this County. I believe that it should be a high priority to fill this position and look forward to carrying on this important working relationship that has been developed between the Agricultural Commissioneer's Office and UCCE.
Posted Jul 9, 2016 9:55 AM by Timothy Pelican
7
As a San Joaquin County farmer, I have grown numerous crops including tomatoes, beans, wheat, bell peppers, sweet corn, apples, cherries, and wine grapes. The working relationship that I have developed over the years with numerous farm advisors for different commodities and research projects that were conducted on my farming operation have been invaluable. Currently our family grows 6,500 acres of wine grapes and operates two wineries, Bear Creek Winery in Lodi and Ironstone Vineyards in Murphys.
Our county farm advisors played an important role as our operation made the transition from row crops to wine grapes. Lodi was previously known for grape varietals such as French Colombard, Chenin Blanc, and Tokay. Working with former farm advisor Jim Kissler, I was one of the first to plant Chardonnay wine grapes in the Lodi area. With the cooperation of growers and our county farm advisors, the wine grape industry in San Joaquin County has evolved. I have seen the introduction of the mechanical grape harvester and drip irrigation, the implementation of IPM sustainable agriculture, the transition to premium wine grape varietals, and the growth to over 100,000 acres of wine grapes and over eighty wineries in the area. My experiences as a San Joaquin County grower have proven to me how valuable the viticulture farm advisor is in San Joaquin County.
Posted Jul 10, 2016 9:04 PM by John Kautz
8
The Lodi Winegrape Commission represents over 750 winegrape growers and over 110,000 producing acres of grapes, most of are located in San Joaquin County. It is imperative that the pending open Viticulture Advisor position in San Joaquin County is filled in a timely manner. This advisor would not only serve in a capacity to address production and pest management issues, but also to act as liaison between the wine grape industry, the University of California, and other agricultural specialists in other winegrape producing counties in the state. The Viticulture Advisor position bridges the gap between the work of the winegrape research community, University of California, government and regulatory agencies and the growers. The advisor aides in the critical role of identifying and coordinating research and solutions to production and pest challenges that impact grape vineyards throughout the county and state. Over the years, with this position’s contributions, the Lodi region has made great strides in becoming a leading wine region. This recognition is not just the state, but in the world as recognized by Wine Enthusiast magazine 2015. It is imperative we continue to have Viticulture Advisor in San Joaquin county to continue to lead the wine grape industry throughout the world.

Thank you
Galen Schmiedt
Chairman of the Board, and Acting Executive director
Lodi Winegrape Commission
Posted Jul 10, 2016 10:03 PM by Galen Schmiedt
9
As a winegrape PCA in the Lodi area I see firsthand the pivotal role the San Joaquin County farm adviser has with linking University knowledge with the pest management industry. This University knowledge spans all aspects of winegrape production but it’s the areas of pest and disease management and fertility that arms the PCA industry with knowledge to keep this economically important crop thriving. By not having this position filled it would create a massive void in the network of established farm advisers, leaving the largest winegrape producing area in the state without representation and guidance. I strongly encourage filling this position quickly, with the highest priority.

Charlie Starr
PCA / CCA
Viticultural Services
Posted Jul 11, 2016 8:53 AM by Charles Starr
10
The importance of this position to the county cannot be fully expressed in a short paragraph. As the go-to person in an area of over 100,000 acres of winegrapes this position would continue to be the industry liaison responsible for connecting the largest winegrape area in the nation with the leaders on the forefront of research and development. Winegrapes are an economic juggernaut for the county and for the state of California. This position plays a pivotal and vital role in keeping the winegrowing community economically thriving through a multitude of roles including pest and disease research, regulatory support, and overall agricultural support by being the key link between industry knowledge and the grower community. The Lodi Winegrape Commission looks forward to working with and supporting the advisor with both collaborative support as well as economic funding. As a commission representing a majority of the counties acres of winegrapes and hundreds of growers, we strongly encourage filling this position immediately with the highest priority.

Charlie Starr
Chairman
Lodi Winegrape Commission Research & Education Committee
Posted Jul 11, 2016 10:52 AM by Charlie Starr
11
To put things in perspective, the 105,000 acres of wine grapes currently farmed by more than 750 diversified growers in our county represents the total acreage of Napa and Sonoma counties, COMBINED. The advisor position will allow ANR to be positioned as a leader within an active, innovative and dedicated group of producers who enable our wineries to produce some of the finest wines in the world. This industry continues to grow as new growers are diversifying their operations to plant vineyards as well as existing growers who continue to expand and replace existing vineyards to meet the challenge of producing in a world marketplace. These growers face ever-growing challenges in the form of increased regulatory and environmental compliance related issues and need science-based solutions to address these issues. This position will enable ANR to advance strategic initiatives on sustainable food systems, water quality and quantity, and provide the vital link for research and ongoing efforts to address endemic and invasive pests and diseases. Some of the priority issues will be to increase vineyard production efficiency while reducing the environmental footprint of production practices. Given the critical needs of this industry, we urge you to fill this position in a timely manner.

Bruce Blodgett
Posted Jul 11, 2016 11:34 AM by San Joaquin Farm Bureau Federation
12
July 11, 2016


I understand that Paul Verdegaal, UC Viticulture Advisor in San Joaquin County, will retire November 2017. As a 23 year veteran PCA in San Joaquin county, also a 35 year grape grower and a director of Lodi Wine Grape Commission I want to express my support for filling this position in a timely manner.
The San Joaquin County viticulture advisor is a key for the Lodi wine grape production and serves as a key link to the wine grape industry. The advisor represents the largest wine grape producing county in California and the nation, providing unique and numerous opportunities to positively impact San Joaquin County and California industry.
The five largest wineries in California also have vineyards in San Joaquin County. Wine grape acreage continues to expand via replacement of older vineyards and conversion of annual crops and rangeland. As a PCA, I appreciate the direct access to continued research and outreach on the best strategies for vineyard replanting, site preparation, and design.

I ask that you prioritize this position to be filled prior to the retirement of Paul.

Kind Regards,

Galen Schmiedt
Posted Jul 11, 2016 11:47 AM by Galen Schmiedt
13
The San Joaquin County and Delta Water Quality Coalitions is responsible for helping growers comply with the Irrigated Land Regulatory Program implemented by the Central Valley Regional Water Quality Control Board. As part of our mission we work with growers to improve water quality and implement management practices that are protective of water quality.

The Area Orchard System Advisor is an essential part of helping growers develop and implement those farming practices that are protective of water quality. The Coalition over the years has worked with the UCCE specialists to hold workshops, grower meetings and conduct research which would improve farming practices and improve water quality.

It is essential to have this position within San Joaquin County. The Area Orchard System Advisor’s knowledge and expertise allows the growers and the Coalition to develop comprehensive solutions to water quality and sustainable farming. Growers rely heavily on information developed by UCCE to meet the need of their farming operations. We urge you to fill this position.
Posted Jul 11, 2016 12:05 PM by Michael Wackman, Executive Director, San Joaquin County and Delta Water Qualithy Coalition
14
San Joaquin County has become a leader in wine grape production over the last several years in large part due to the cooperative efforts of our grape growers and UCCE. Paul Verdegaal has been an exemplary advocate for our local grape industry, and it is of significant importance that UCANR find a highly qualified replacement for Paul upon his retirement in late 2017.

The importance of our wine grape industry to the local and State economy cannot be overstated: this is an industry that plays a very important role in the world's perception of California as a leading producer of high quality wines. And as San Joaquin County is the leading producer of wine grapes, we will have a large hand in continuing and building upon that reputation.

Please help our area continue to be a viticulture leader in California by filling this advisor position with a superb viticulture specialist. Thank you.
Posted Jul 11, 2016 12:11 PM by Gary Barton - Chair, San Joaquin County Agricultural Advisory Board
15
As a very small wine grape grower, I could not produce the quality nor correct varietals of grapes I do today without the work of the local Viticultural Adviser. The varietals were put through a test program, grown and proven to be suitable for our soils, as well as having the right characteristics to make a commercially good wine. A local adviser's access to vineyards, large and small, hastens the observance of threats (pathogen, insect, pesticide, etc) leading to a better directed plan of action.
Posted Jul 11, 2016 2:37 PM by Barbara Huecksteadt, small grape grower
16
As a San Joaquin County Supervisor, I have the distinct pleasure of working closely with Brent Holtz at the UC Cooperative Extension and the members of his staff. They are invaluable to the growers in the region with their expertise and willingness to provide critical information whenever requested or needed.
My district covers over 54% of the County and in addition to three of the seven cities, I have by far the largest representation of farmers and ranchers. Consequently, I am very active with the farm community including the Farm Bureau. I attend all their Board meetings and always appreciate Brent’s reports on what is happening at UC Davis. Our partnership with the UC Extension, whereby the County provides office space in our Robert Cabral Agricultural Center in addition to clerical and vehicle support, ensures the best strategies to increase our growers’ productivity.
Mr. Holtz is requesting the position titled Viticulture Advisor for San Joaquin County. Our Lodi area within my district is recognized as one of the premier grape growing and wineries in the world. We have 80 wineries in the County and that includes some of the largest and most prominent on the planet. A Viticulture Advisor would provide expertise in breeding new varieties, managing pests and nutrients, siting vineyards and perfecting the art and science of wine making. This position would enhance your relationship between the UC Extension and the growers in the region.
Consequently, I give my total support to Mr. Holtz’s proposal and believe the position would be a tremendous benefit to our agricultural economy.

Chuck Winn, Supervisor 4th District
San Joaquin County
Posted Jul 11, 2016 2:47 PM by San Joaquin County Supervisor Chuck Winn
17
The importance of this position to the county cannot be fully expressed in a short paragraph. As the go-to person in an area of over 100,000 acres of winegrapes this position would continue to be the industry liaison responsible for connecting the largest winegrape area in the nation with the leaders on the forefront of research and development. Winegrapes are an economic juggernaut for the county and for the state of California. This position plays a pivotal and vital role in keeping the winegrowing community economically thriving through a multitude of roles including pest and disease research, regulatory support, and overall agricultural support by being the key link between industry knowledge and the grower community. The Lodi Winegrape Commission looks forward to working with and supporting the advisor with both collaborative support as well as economic funding. As a commission representing a majority of the counties acres of winegrapes and hundreds of growers, we strongly encourage filling this position immediately with the highest priority.

Charlie Starr
Chairman
Lodi Winegrape Commission Research & Education Committee
Posted Jul 11, 2016 3:41 PM by Charlie Starr
18
The San Joaquin County Resource Conservation District has been a success due to the local grape growers in it's community. Without ongoing efforts to produce and be the leading grape growing region in the nation, we as a district (and many others) would not be able to survive without the conscious efforts and education dedicated towards being an elite region. With that said, the San Joaquin Country Resource Conservation District strongly encourages this position to be filled with high urgency.
Posted Jul 11, 2016 4:10 PM by Richard Rodriguez and RCD Board of Directors
19
For decades, advances in viticultural science and technology have been principal drivers for the San Joaquin County wine grape industry. They have had positive impacts on fruit production, wine grape quality, and vineyard operational efficiency. More recently, viticultural science and technology were essential elements for the development and implementation of the Lodi Rules for Sustainable Winegrowing certification program. These two factors made significant contributions to the ascent of San Joaquin County as a leading wine grape region.

With regard to viticultural science and technology, the most important individual in San Joaquin County is the University of California Viticulture Farm Advisor. His county-specific research efforts have advanced management of on-site resources, such as water and soils, as well the best use of applied resources, including labor, machinery, and agricultural chemicals for pest and disease control. Through field trials, he has identified improved varieties, clones, rootstocks, and grape growing practices for San Joaquin County.

Just as important, the UC Farm Advisor is the primary educator of wine grape growers in San Joaquin County. His Lodi Grape Day and field days are always well attended, drawing grape growers throughout the county and beyond. In network studies of individuals involved in San Joaquin County wine grape growing the UC Farm Advisor is at the center. He is undoubtedly the most sought after consultant in viticultural matters for grape growers and other vineyard advisors.

Given the vital importance of this position, I respectfully request you fill the position of UC Viticulture Farm Advisor in San Joaquin County as soon as possible.

Stan Grant
Vineyard Consultant, Progressive Viticulture
Posted Jul 11, 2016 4:18 PM by Stan Grant
20
As the Director of Industry Relations for the Department of Viticulture and Enology at UC Davis, I have worked with the current area viticulture advisor for San Joaquin County, Paul Verdegaal, to bring educational programs to the Lodi winegrowing area. He is highly respected and valued in San Joaquin County and statewide within ANR in wine grape production and serves as a key link between the wine grape industry and academic departments at California universities with grapegrowing/winemaking programs.

In addition, growers and wineries face mounting pressures from increased regulatory and environmental compliance requirements and need the science-based and unbiased guidance that an area viticulture advisor is uniquely positioned to provide, especially with respect to water issues.

San Joaquin County is home to greater than 105,000 acres of winegrapes (20% of California’s production), which in turn supports 85 local wineries and staff. The five largest wineries in California have vineyards in San Joaquin County. San Joaquin County is uniquely positioned in its ability to produce a wide range of winegrape varietals to meet the demands of many different wine programs seeking quality winegrapes at various price points.
Posted Jul 11, 2016 4:45 PM by Karen Block
21
I understand that Paul Verdegaal will retire in November 2017. With over 105,000 acres of winegrapes, San Joaquin County is viewed by many as the "engine" that drives the wine industry in CA. This viewpoint is derived from the conviction that San Joaquin County vineyards can produce good yields of high quality fruit. Paul's work in applied research and extension/outreach over the years has been an important factor in growers being able to achieve these positive results in their vineyards. Grape growers in San Joaquin County and California are faced with many challenges(sustainability,increased vineyard production efficiency, water quality, etc.) that will require sound, unbiased, science-based information. The San Joaquin County Viticulture Advisor will be a very important statewide leader in the efforts to meet these challenges. Growers rely on this Position for information and support. Consequently, filling the San Joaquin County Viticulture Advisor Position is a high priority for the grape and wine industry. I respectfully request that this Position be replaced and filled as soon as possible after Paul's retirement.
Posted Jul 11, 2016 8:41 PM by Keith Striegler
22
20% of the vineyard acreage in the state and no farm advisor? There is no question that the position needs to be filled.
Chris Storm
Vino Farms
Posted Jul 11, 2016 9:36 PM by Chris Storm
23
This county is the largest producer of varietal wine grape in California and the United States. It is only fitting that it has an advisor to continue the advancement of the industry for future generations..
Posted Jul 11, 2016 9:45 PM by Stanton Lange
24
As the Director of Industry Relations for the Department of Viticulture and Enology at UC Davis, I have worked with the current area viticulture advisor for San Joaquin County, Paul Verdegaal, to bring educational programs to the Lodi winegrowing area. He is highly respected and valued in San Joaquin County and statewide within ANR in wine grape production and serves as a key link between the wine grape industry and academic departments at California universities with grapegrowing/winemaking programs.

In addition, growers and wineries face mounting pressures from increased regulatory and environmental compliance requirements and need the science-based and unbiased guidance that an area viticulture advisor is uniquely positioned to provide, especially with respect to water issues.

San Joaquin County is home to greater than 105,000 acres of winegrapes (20% of California’s production), which in turn supports 85 local wineries and staff. The five largest wineries in California have vineyards in San Joaquin County. San Joaquin County is uniquely positioned in its ability to produce a wide range of winegrape varietals to meet the demands of many different wine programs seeking quality winegrapes at various price points.
Posted Jul 12, 2016 7:44 AM by Karen Block

Add New Comment/Feedback for this Proposal

Comments are currently closed.
Webmaster Email: jewarnert@ucanr.edu