ANR Employees
University of California
ANR Employees

4-H & Families

Employee comments sought for dean and faculty administrator policy revisions

UC invites comments on proposed revisions to Academic Personnel Manual Sections 240 (APM - 240), Deans, and 246 (APM - 246), Faculty Administrators (100% time).

Summarized below are the proposed key revisions that are being distributed for systemwide review: 

  • To align with previous revisions to APM - 025, Conflict of Commitment and Outside Activities of Faculty Members, language has been added in Sections 240-20-c and 246-20-c to clarify that both uncompensated and compensated activities are reported and count toward the time limit, but that vacation days are deducted only for compensated activities;
  • Language has been added to clarify that Deans and Faculty Administrators who hold concurrent Health Sciences Compensation Plan appointments are subject to APM - 670, Health Sciences Compensation Plan, and APM - 671, Conflict of Commitment and Outside Activities of Health Sciences Compensation Plan Participants; and
  • Since faculty administrative salaries should be greater than the underlying faculty appointments, the language in Sections 240-18-a(5) and 246-18-a(4) has been revised to refer to the salary of the underlying faculty appointment.

The proposed revisions to APM - 240, Deans, and APM - 246, Faculty Administrators (100% time) are posted under the “Systemwide Review” tab at: https://www.ucop.edu/academic-personnel-programs/academic-personnel-policy/policies-under-review/index.html.

If you have any questions or if you wish to comment, please contact Robin Sanchez at rgsanchez@ucanr.edu, no later than March 15, 2020. Please indicate “APM-240/246” in the subject line.

Posted on Wednesday, November 20, 2019 at 11:21 AM
  • Author: Robin Sanchez

Social media webinars to hone your outreach

In 2018, an estimated 2.65 billion people were using social media worldwide, a number projected to increase to 3.1 billion in 2021. YouTube has 2 billion active monthly users who watch how-to content regularly. Roughly 70% of adults use Facebook, which is consistently a top source of online referrals to the UC ANR website. 

Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, LinkedIn, YouTube and other social platforms provide tools for UC ANR to expand our reach to more people who can use our research-based information to better their lives and businesses.   

UC ANR colleagues who use social media for outreach will have an opportunity to discuss their tactics and strategies during three upcoming webinars being offered by Rose Hayden-Smith, UCCE advisor in Ventura County.

1. Nov. 25 Social Café -- Writing for Readability 

Join Hayden-Smith on Monday, Nov. 25, at 11:30 a.m. for a 30-minute webinar that will provide essential writing tips designed to help you improve the readability of your work. The Social Cafe is an informal, monthly "drop in" session that explores various social media topics.

https://ucanr.zoom.us/j/751701428

2. Dec. 11 Facebook Webinar

Communicating Your Story: Facebook

Wednesday, Dec. 11, 2019

11:30 a.m. -12:30 p.m.

https://ucanr.zoom.us/j/751701428

Presenters: Rose Hayden-Smith and Strat Comm

Facebook has become an important part of communicating our stories. Ever wonder if the platform is right for you? In this fast-paced webinar, we'll cover the basics of communicating your story through Facebook, including:

  • Why you might want to use Facebook;
  • Techniques and best practices to get started…or get better;
  • Using images and video to enhance your posts;
  • Quick tips for effectively and efficiently using the site.

Participants will also be provided access to a range of resources and tools to support their Facebook efforts, including samples, tip and FAQ sheets, guidelines, and more. 

3. Dec. 12 Social Café -- Setting 2020 social media goals

Join Hayden-Smith for a 30-minute Social Cafe webinar on Thursday, Dec. 12, at 11:30 a.m. The Social Cafe is an informal, monthly "drop in" session that explores various social media topics. This Social Cafe will focus on setting 2020 social media goals. 

https://ucanr.zoom.us/j/751701428

Posted on Monday, November 18, 2019 at 5:35 PM
  • Author: Linda Forbes

Foreign Influence

Dear ANR Research Community:

UC ANR values international collaborations and educational opportunities with foreign institutions, through collaborative research, and scholarly exchanges that are an essential part of the academic community. At the same time, the University of California must be careful to comply with U.S. laws and regulations that govern how international engagements are managed and reported.

The current regulatory landscape includes growing concerns by the U.S. government regarding inappropriate influence by foreign entities over federally funded research. In August 2018, Francis Collins, the director of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), issued a “Foreign Influence Letter to Grantees (PDF)” that reminded the research community of the need to “disclose all forms of other support and financial interests, including support coming from foreign governments or other foreign entities… in accordance with the NIH Grants Policy Statement, [on] all applications and progress reports.” As Dr. Collins' statement makes clear, transparency in this area is essential. UC ANR and external funding agencies need to know about the relationships that UC ANR and individual members of the research community have established with foreign organizations.

The following is a summary of key disclosure obligations that often come into play when working with international partners. The UC Office of the President Ethics, Compliance and Audit Services has compiled information about this topic on a website, including links to UC and sponsor policies and communications from various agencies concerning foreign influence and disclosure requirements.  All investigators with sponsored projects should check the sponsor's current disclosure requirements carefully, and if in doubt, contact the Office of Contracts & Grants at ocg@ucanr.edu for disclosure assistance or further guidance. 

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) issued a Notice on July 10, 2019, reminding research institutions that NIH-funded researchers must “report foreign activities through documentation of other support, foreign components, and financial conflict of interest to prevent scientific, budgetary, or commitment overlap” (NOT-OD-19-114). Other Support includes “all resources made available to a researcher in support of and/or related to all of their research endeavors, regardless of whether or not they have monetary value and regardless of whether they are based at the institution the researcher identifies for the current grant.” An FAQ can be found here.

The National Science Foundation (NSF) issued a Dear Colleague Letter: Research Protection from Director France Cordova on July 11, 2019 clarifying multiple steps NSF is taking to mitigate risks from “activities threatening our research community, such as certain foreign-government-sponsored talent recruitment programs.”  NSF has proposed clarification of the proposal disclosure requirements and reporting requirements for both current and pending support and professional appointments. Those clarifications are included in the draft Proposal and Award Policies and Procedures Guide (NSF 20-1).  Effective January 2020, NSF proposes to use an electronic format for submission of biographical sketches, including disclosure of all appointments, and disclosure of current and pending support information.

The Department of Energy issued a directive dated June 7, 2019, mandating that “federal and contractor personnel fully disclose and, as necessary, terminate affiliations with foreign government-supported talent recruitment programs” on new DOE contracts and subcontracts. DOE is expected to issue a separate policy directive to implement the requirement on DOE grants and cooperative agreements.

NASA has long-standing restrictions regarding use of NASA funds to enter into agreements “to participate, collaborate, or coordinate bilaterally in any way with China or any Chinese-owned company, at the prime recipient level or at any subrecipient level, whether the bilateral involvement is funded or performed under a no-exchange of funds arrangement” (grant restrictionscontract restrictions).

If you are an investigator on a federally funded project, you should take the following actions:

  1.  Review and update Other Support and Current and Pending Support information in proposals
  2.  Review and update Biosketches
  3. Ensure appropriate disclosure of foreign components for NIH-supported projects
  4. Report all reimbursed or sponsored travel related to U.S. Public Health Service-supported projects
  5. Review Conflict of Interest (COI) disclosure and update as necessary
  6. Reach out to UCANR's Export Control Officer for guidance related to export control regulations
  7. Contact the Office of Contracts & Grants when entering into a material transfer agreement or nondisclosure agreement when sharing or exchanging materials or information

In addition to Sponsored Projects, only designated University personnel are authorized to accept gifts from any source. For this reason, you must disclose to the UCANR's Development Office all gifts solicited from any domestic or foreign individual or organization.

Because some federal agencies have begun to investigate cases where foreign support has not been properly disclosed, the UCOP Office of Ethics, Compliance and Audit Services (ECAS), has developed systemwide guidance for reporting and follow-up related to this issue. These “Escalation Protocols” are summarized here:

  • If you receive communication from a federal agency regarding federally funded research grants, contracts or awards in which the federal agency expresses concern about a foreign entity's involvement in the research; or 
  • If you have knowledge of any violation of any federal agency policy or federal law regarding federally funded research grants, contracts or awards related to a foreign entity's involvement in the research; 
  • The university employee who receives the communication or has knowledge noted above must immediately (within 24 hours) notify ANR Controller Jake McGuire, who will initiate the next steps to investigate and respond to this matter.

It is critical that every member of the UC ANR community make every effort to understand the policies that govern their work and be certain that all necessary steps are taken to comply. To support increased awareness and understanding of these issues, the Office of Contracts and Grants is hosting a webinar at 9:30 a.m.-10:30 a.m. on Wednesday, December 4, on “Foreign Influence: What is Foreign Influence and how can I comply?” We encourage you to join this webinar on Zoom at https://ucanr.zoom.us/j/502451113 and/or call in at (669) 900-6833, Webinar ID: 502 451 113. The requirements related to foreign influence are complex, so please reach out to Brian Oatman in Risk & Safety Services and/or Kathleen Nolan in the Office of Contracts and Grants if you need further guidance and/or clarification. 

Your help and cooperation will support our mission to connect the power of UC research in agriculture, natural resources, nutrition and youth development with local communities to improve the lives of all Californians.

Sincerely,

Wendy Powers                                                   
Associate Vice President

Jake McGuire
Controller and Chief Ethics & Compliance Officer

 

Posted on Tuesday, November 12, 2019 at 8:28 AM
Tags: foreign influence (1), policy (63)

Regent Estolano, Senator Caballero tour UCCE Fresno

 

4-H community educator Alena Pacheco (in green jacket), introduced Regent Estolano (in white pants) and Sen. Caballero (next to Pacheco) to UCCE Fresno partners Street Saints, who offer a safe place for youth after school where they can develop employment skills through 4-H activities.

“UC ANR touches the lives of thousands of people in rural communities and urban centers alike,” said state Senator Anna Caballero, after meeting UC Cooperative Extension staff and stakeholders in Fresno County. Caballero joined UC Regent Cecilia Estolano for a tour Sept. 25 to see results of ANR's work with small-scale farmers, 4-H youth and UC Master Gardener volunteers.

“On my tour, I saw how ANR is a valuable partner across generations and communities for Californians who grow our food, and green our neighborhoods,” Estolano said. “From urban 4-H chapters to Master Gardeners to culturally connected crop advisors and nutritional instructors, ANR is keeping California on the leading edge of agriculture, health and healing.”

Ruth Dahlquist-Willard shows Estolano moringa and describes her work to connect disadvantaged farmers with resources to improve their businesses.

Joined by Vice Provost Mark Bell, UCCE Fresno County Director Karmjot Randhawa, and Anne Megaro, government and community relations director, Caballero and Estolano began the tour with a visit to the Thao family farm, where they learned about specialty crops – such as jujubes and moringa – grown in the area by Southeast Asian farmers. UCCE farm advisor Ruth Dahlquist-Willard described growing and marketing moringa and her work to help bring resources to disadvantaged farmers to help improve their prosperity. Michael Yang, UCCE Hmong agricultural assistant, talked about delivering UCCE information to farmers in Hmong via his radio program.

Next, they visited Street Saints, a program of the Fresno Economic Opportunities Commission, and learned how they created an afterschool program to keep low-resource youth in Southwest Fresno safe. The Street Saints, who partnered with 4-H, described for the senator and regent how they promote healthy choices to deter young people from engaging in gang activity in their urban setting. Using 4-H's evidence-based curricula, Street Saints offers a safe place for youth after school where participating youth develop employment skills through 4-H activities such as sewing classes, STEM Teen Teachers, “Mindful Me” to improve physical and emotional health, and working in a community garden. 

At Garden of the Sun, Caballero and Estolano learned how the Master Gardener Program serves the community.
At Garden of the Sun, Caballero and Estolano learned how the Master Gardener Program serves the community through extending research-based information on home horticulture. With nearly 200 Master Gardener Volunteers, UCCE Fresno is able to staff a horticulture helpline, provide public educational classes and plant clinics, and donate pounds of food grown on-site to organizations in the community. They also heard about collaborative activities between the Master Gardener Program and UC ANR's nutrition programs. Nancy Zumkeller, CalFresh Healthy Living, UC nutrition educator, explained the importance of gardening and nutrition education to the Fresno Rescue Mission's Rescue the Children program.

“It was exciting to see the interaction between the senator and regent with the UCCE stakeholders,” Randhawa said. “Both seemed really engaged in the work and asked questions. It's vital for them to see how we engage with the community and how the community amplifies the research and support we provide. They met small farmers and 4-H members who have built businesses based on their work with 4-H and Cooperative Extension. They met with Master Gardeners. It was fantastic for them to experience, rather than be told, how we deliver ANR's mission.”

Megaro got the impression Caballero and Estolano enjoyed meeting some of the Californians who have bettered their lives by participating in ANR programs. 

“I think they both knew us mostly for our rural agricultural work, but this tour really showed them how we're active and present in urban communities to effect change and how we partner with community-based organizations to further our reach.” Megaro said.  “We also talked about how the sites we visited were just one example of the programs and services we provide throughout the state, and how we are looking to increase resources so we can build out our programs to serve more people.”

State Senator Anna Caballero, left, and UC Regent Cecilia Estolano learned more about how UCCE serves urban Californians.

 

Posted on Friday, November 1, 2019 at 10:58 AM
Tags: advocacy (13), October 2019 (13), regents (6)

Names in the News

Randhawa to oversee UCCE in Fresno, Madera, Kings and Tulare counties

Karmjot Randhawa

Karmjot Randhawa joined ANR on Sept. 6, 2019, as the UC Cooperative Extension director for Fresno, Madera, Kings and Tulare counties. 

In this newly created staff position, Randhawa is responsible for the coordination and overall operations of Cooperative Extension programs in Fresno, Madera, Kings and Tulare counties. Unlike traditional county director positions, Randhawa will have no academic research responsibilities so she can focus on overseeing the educational and applied research programs and providing direction and leadership to the academic and support staff within the county extension programs. 

Prior to joining ANR, the Central Valley native was the research translation operations manager at George Mason University's Center for Climate Change Communication. 

“I look forward to increasing the visibility of UCCE by communicating the positive impacts realized by the people who live in the San Joaquin Valley and benefit from the research activities and contributions of these units,” Randhawa said.

Randhawa received her B.S. and M.S. in research psychology at California State University, Fresno and received her MBA from Johns Hopkins University. She is currently completing the Climate Change and Health Certification Program at Yale University. 

Karmjot is based in Fresno and can be reached at (559) 241-7514 and kgrandhawa@ucanr.edu

Zhou named UCCE assistant specialist for small farms

Qi Zhou

Qi Zhou joined ANR on Sept. 3, 2019, as a UCCE assistant specialist for small farms in Santa Clara County. She will work closely with project directors at UCCE Santa Clara to lead research and extension and extension work related to food safety practices on small farms, beginning farmer education and Asian vegetable production. 

Prior to joining ANR, Zhou conducted research on peach fruit production at Clemson University. At Huazhong Agricultural University, Zhou designed and conducted an experiment that identified the differences between flood-tolerant and flood-susceptible Poplar seedlings. Zhou has published several scientific manuscripts and abstracts and given extension presentations.

Zhou earned a Ph.D. in plant and environmental sciences with a minor in statistics from Clemson University, South Carolina, a master's degree in horticulture and forestry from Huazhong Agricultural University, China, and a bachelor's degree in horticulture from Hunan Agricultural University, China. In addition to English, Zhou is fluent in Mandarin.

Zhou is based in San Jose and can be reached at (408) 282-3109 and qiizhou@ucanr.edu

Aram named UCCE specialty crops advisor

Kamyar Aram

Kamyar Aram joined ANR on Aug. 5, 2019, as the UC Cooperative Extension specialty crops advisor serving Contra Costa and Alameda counties. 

Prior to joining ANR, Aram was a postdoctoral scholar at UC Davis working on research and outreach for the management of vectored grapevine virus diseases, emphasizing diagnostics, the use of disease-screened plant materials and area-wide management approaches. He also has several years of work experience in commercial viticulture and winemaking in New York, Chile and California. His doctoral research focused on the life cycle of the Sudden Oak Death pathogen in aquatic environments, and as a staff research assistant at UC Davis, his research focused on diagnostics and outreach for this forest and landscape disease. For his master's thesis, he studied the use of compost as a source for nitrogen and in suppression of soilborne diseases in vegetable production, gaining experience with field production at Cornell's vegetable research farm.

Aram earned a Ph.D. in plant pathology from UC Davis and an M.S. in horticulture (vegetable crops) from Cornell University. He received B.S. and B.A. degrees from the [LF1] Ohio State University in plant biology and Latin. In addition to English, he speaks Spanish, Italian, French and Farsi.

Aram is based in Concord and can be reached at (925) 608-6692 and kamaram@ucanr.edu.

Khan named UCCE water and watershed sciences specialist

Safeeq Khan

Safeeq Khan joined ANR on Oct. 1, 2019, as a UC Cooperative Extension assistant water and watershed sciences specialist. His research broadly focuses on understanding the interaction between climate and ecosystems to inform land and water management. He uses data-driven numerical models as a research tool to aid in the understanding of watershed systems. As a CE specialist, Khan will focus on developing and carrying out collaborative, multifaceted research and extension related to mountain hydrology and their linkage with downstream water uses statewide, with special attention to the Sierra Nevada-Central Valley watersheds.

Prior to joining UC ANR, Khan was a professional researcher and adjunct professor in the department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at UC Merced for five years. Khan brings over 10 years of research, education and extension experience. He has published more than 35 peer-reviewed journal papers and book chapters, successfully secured several externally funded projects, and presented his work to a diverse range of audiences through digital and print media, workshops and conferences. He has worked very closely with state and federal agencies, local landowners and nonprofit organizations, both in California and elsewhere. He has led several projects related to watershed management, from investigating the impact of non-native tree species and groundwater overdraft on streamflow in Hawaii to mapping hydrological vulnerabilities to climate change in the Pacific Northwest. More recently, his research has been focused on evaluating climate change and watershed restoration impacts on water and forest health and developing stakeholder-driven adaptive decision support tools. He serves as an associate editor for the journal Hydrological Processes. Khan is also a co-director of UC Merced's first Innovations at the Nexus of Food, Energy and Water Systems (INFEWS) grant that focuses on connected wildland-storage-cropland subsystems in California.

Khan earned a Ph.D. in natural resources and environmental management from University of Hawaii at Manoa. He also holds a master's degree in agricultural systems and management from Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, India and a bachelor's degree in agricultural engineering from CSA University of Agriculture and Technology Kanpur, India. In addition to English, he is fluent in Hindi and Urdu. 

Khan is based at UC Merced and can be reached at (209) 386-3623 and msafeeq@ucanr.edu. Follow him on Twitter @safeeqkhan.

Farrar elected chair-elect for National IPM Coordinating Committee

Jim Farrar

Jim Farrar has been elected chair-elect for National Integrated Pest Management Coordinating Committee, which is under the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities' ESCOP/ECOP committee system. He will be chair-elect, chair, and past-chair for the next three years.

Farrar will serve with committee chair Danesha Seth Carley of the Southern IPM Center and Ann Hazelrigg of University of Vermont Extension, who moves into the past-chair position.

The National IPM Coordinating Committee is a committee of the Extension Committee on Organization and Policy (ECOP) and the Experiment Station Committee on Organization and Policy (ESCOP) and is a subcommittee of the ESCOP Science and Technology Committee. The committee facilitates coordination and collaboration nationally among and between IPM research and extension at the land-grant universities, and between the land-grants and federal agencies involved in IPM. 

Fennimore receives Fulbright award

Steve Fennimore

The U.S. Department of State and the J. William Fulbright Foreign Scholarship Board announced that Steven Fennimore, UC Cooperative Extension specialist in the Department of Plant Sciences at UC Davis, has received a Fulbright U.S. Scholar Program award to work in agriculture in Uruguay. Fennimore will conduct research and teaching at the INIA Las Brujas horticultural field station as part of a project to develop sustainable weed management systems in specialty crops.

Fennimore, director of the statewide Vegetable Research and Information Center, focuses on weed management in vegetable crops and small fruits, as well as weed seed biology and physiology, and seed bank ecology.

Based in Salinas, Fennimore conducts a research and extension program focused on weed management in vegetables, flowers and strawberries, particularly in coastal production areas in California. His program combines chemical and nonchemical methods, for both organic and conventional systems, with the objective of minimizing weed management costs. He also focuses on automated weeding systems to mitigate the severe labor shortages in California, and use of field-scale steam applicators to reduce the need for chemical fumigation in sensitive sites and near urban areas. 

Fennimore is one of over 800 U.S. citizens who will teach, conduct research, and/or provide expertise abroad for the 2019–2020 academic year through the Fulbright U.S. Scholar Program. Recipients of Fulbright awards are selected on the basis of academic and professional achievement, as well as record of service and demonstrated leadership in their respective fields.

Posted on Thursday, October 31, 2019 at 4:26 PM

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