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Posts Tagged: David Lile

Names in the News

Her named SRA in Los Angeles County

Calvin Her

Calvin Her joined UC Cooperative Extension in Los Angeles County as a staff research assistant in February. 

Her graduated with a BS in biology from Metropolitan State University in Minnesota and one day hopes to pursue a master's degree in Entomology. He has worked with both the Minnesota Department of Agriculture and the California Department of Food and Agriculture. With the CDFA, Her worked within the invasive insect program to control the Mediterranean fruit fly and the Asian citrus psyllid. With the MDA, Her worked within the plant protection division to monitor the detection of invasive insect species in Minnesota such as the Velvet Longhorn Beetle, Brown Marmorated Stinkbug, Swede Midge and many others.   

Working with Siavash Taravati, area IPM advisor, Her will be researching drywood and subterranean termites, pest ant monitoring and control, California pesticide licensing and doing literature reviews.

In his free time, Her raises Monarch butterflies and documents his efforts in hopes to inspire at-home conservation. Her can be reached at cvher@ucanr.edu.

Berry named SRA at South Coast REC

Kaitlyn Berry

Kaitlyn Berry joined UC ANR as a staff research associate I in February. She will be assisting with the UC Landscape Plant Irrigation Trials at the UCANR South Coast Research and Extension Center. 

Berry earned a BS in biological science with a concentration in marine biology and a minor in chemistry from California State University, Fullerton. She is currently completing her masters in biological science at CSU Fullerton and is a member of the Wildlife Ecology and Conservation Laboratory. Her thesis research focuses on the effects of artificial light pollution on the activity and foraging behavior of the Pacific kangaroo rat (Dipodomys agilis). 

She has been a volunteer at the CSU Fullerton Biology Greenhouse Complex for five years.  Her informal education in planting, propagating, and general maintenance of the teaching collection will allow her to effectively assist with the UC Landscape Plant Irrigation Trials. 

Berry has enjoyed getting to meet and work with the SCREC staff. She is excited to be a part of UCANR and learn more about plant maintenance and research. Berry can be reached at kaiberry@ucanr.edu.

Thaoxaochay joins small farm program in Fresno County

Lilian Thaoxaochay

C. Lilian Thaoxaochay joined UC Cooperative Extension's Small Farms and Specialty Crops Program in Fresno County as a COVID19 education specialist and research assistant in February. She is a first-generation Hmong American born and raised in Fresno. Her family has farmed in the Central Valley for over 30 years.

Thaoxaochay completed her undergraduate degree at Stanford University where she studied Anthropology and Asian American Studies. She was a Cota-Robles fellow at UC Santa Cruz where she received her MA in anthropology. Her previous research experience includes racial/ethnic health disparities and cultural competency in medical education. Her current research interests include the history of agriculture in Southeast Asia, refugee farming in California, and the future of small-scale growers in the Central Valley.

She can be reached at lilthaox@ucanr.edu.

Yabuki joins IT as digital communications specialist

Tetsuto Yabuki

Tetsuto Yabuki joined UC ANR Information Technology as a digital communications specialist on Feb. 26.

He brings over 20 years of web development experience, most recently serving as a solutions architect at Breyta in Davis. For the past three years, Yabuki worked as a contractor on the CropManage web application. He will continue to focus on CropManage at UC ANR.

Yabuki earned a Bachelor of Arts in computer science at Columbia University.

He will be based in the UC ANR building in Davis and can be reached at tyabuki@ucanr.edu. His Twitter handle is @TetsutoYabuki.

Lile honored for outstanding achievement in land stewardship

David Lile

For his tremendous contributions to the science and management of rangeland ecosystems, David F. Lile received the Society for Range Management's Outstanding Achievement in Land Stewardship Award.

Over the past three decades, Lile has served the rangeland dependent communities of northeastern California as a UC Cooperative Extension livestock and natural resources advisor. Throughout his career, he has assiduously provided critical leadership to solve rangeland sustainability challenges facing these communities using science-based, solution-oriented approaches. His efforts have aided and facilitated improved policies, strategies and practices to implement partnership-based conservation programs to improve millions of acres of rangelands in the region. Stakeholders place high value on his technical expertise, his friendship and his ability to establish trust and confidence with a diverse community on topics ranging from sage grouse to water quality. He has worked tirelessly to build consensus around contentious topics and create collaborative, science-based solutions to enhance natural resources and sustain productive agricultural enterprises. Lile, who is based in Lassen County, has spent his career pursuing sustainable rangeland management, and this award recognizes that commitment to land stewardship.

Lile was presented the award at the SRM Annual Meeting held virtually in February.

Oberholster honored by ASEV for extension

Anita Oberholster

The American Society for Enology and Viticulture announced Anita Oberholster, UC Cooperative Extension enology specialist, will receive its 2021 ASEV Extension Distinction Award.

Oberholster will receive the award and present “The Challenges of Modern Extension Programs” at the 72nd ASEV National Conference, to be held virtually June 21-24, 2021.

Oberholster completed her doctorate in wine sciences at the University of Adelaide, Australia, in 2008 and worked at the Department of Viticulture and Oenology at Stellenbosch University until 2011, when she became a UC Cooperative Extension Specialist in the Department of Viticulture and Enology at UC Davis. As a UCCE specialist, her research focuses on current issues in the grape and wine industry and she provides research-based information to grape growers and members of the wine industry. Her research includes the impact of climate on grape ripening and phenolic development, grapevine red blotch disease and smoke exposure in the vineyard. Another major focus for Oberholster is the impact of different winemaking techniques on wine composition and quality.

“I love science, agriculture and wine. My job is the perfect blend,” said Oberholster. “Working with the grape and wine industry has been extremely rewarding and I am especially grateful to the ASEV for this high honor and recognition.”

Oberholster has been a member of ASEV since 2011 and served as board director from 2014 to 2020. She served on the ASEV Best Paper Committee and was an American Journal of Enology and Viticulture reviewer and a National Conference moderator and speaker. She continues to serve on the ASEV Technical Program Committee. 

She is also a member of several other organizations, including the American Chemical Society, Groupe Polyphenols, West Coast Smoke Exposure Task Force, UC Davis Chemical and Laboratory Safety Committee, Viticulture & Enology and Food Science and Technology Graduate Group Executive Committees, Robert Mondavi Institute Executive Committee and is chair of the UC Davis Viticulture & Enology Extension Coordination Committee. She reviews for 25 peer-reviewed journals and different funding proposals.

Posted on Tuesday, March 30, 2021 at 9:25 PM

Intermountain REC brings state-of-the-art conferencing to Tulelake

From left, Mark Lagrimini, vice provost of research and extension, and AVP Wendy Powers joined IREC director Rob Wilson for the ribbon cutting of IREC's new multipurpose conference and lab building.

Intermountain Research and Extension Center (IREC) celebrated the grand opening of a multipurpose conference and laboratory building on July 26. The facility will be available for use by private and public groups for business meetings, job fairs, trainings and conferences.

"The facility is the first in the Tulelake area to offer modern audio-visual infrastructure and high-speed internet connectivity capable of supporting remote presentations to stay in touch with groups from around the world," said Rob Wilson, IREC director. "We hope this facility will greatly increase the visibility and accessibility of local events and help draw more regional attention to the area."

Wilson, left, thanked the Staunton family for their generous donation supporting the building.

The conference room was dedicated in honor of the late John Staunton, a local research collaborator with UC Agriculture and Natural Resources who passed away in 2015. Staunton Farms and the Staunton family donated $25,000 to support the building project and recognize the Tulelake farmer and his long-standing support of agriculture and research.

Winema Elevators/Western Milling, Sensient Natural Ingredients, Macy's Flying Service, and Basin Fertilizer also contributed support.

UC awarded approximately $2 million for this capital improvement project with funds from UC lease revenue bonds to pay for most of the building's design and construction costs, but additional support is needed to complete the project. Intermountain REC has set a fundraising goal of $100,000 to pay for tables, chairs, furnishing and lab equipment for the building.

Donors will receive recognition in the entry of the new facility.

A special UC fund has been created to collect tax-deductible contributions to be used solely for this building project. Donations over $50 will receive recognition in print and on the IREC website. Donations over $1,000 will receive recognition on the donor wall in the building entryway. Name plate recognition on the donor wall will be based on the gift amount: Gold ($2,500+), Silver ($1,750 to $2,499), and Bronze ($1,000 to $1,749). Donations can be made via check using the enclosed envelope or by credit card by visiting the IREC website at http://irec.ucanr.edu and clicking the “Make a gift” link.

During the field day, Wilson gave an update on onion white rot research.

The ribbon cutting followed the 2018 IREC field day, an annual event that showcases the research underway at the 140-acre facility. Charlie Pickett of USDA, UC Davis Plant Breeding Center director Charlie Brummer, UCCE farm advisors David Lile and Rachael Long and UCCE specialist Dan Putnam joined Wilson in giving research updates on the tour.

Research presentations included work on biological control of cereal leaf beetle, influence of fall harvest management of irrigated grass hays, onion white rot, managing alfalfa weevil and clover rootcucurlio, pulse crop options for theKlamath Basin, cover crops and amendments, cutting schedule effects on lowlignin alfalfa andgermplasm evaluation of alfalfa and tallfescue.

UCCE advisor Rachael Long demonstrates using a sweep net to monitor for alfalfa weevils.

Steve Orloff, who conducted research at IREC for many years, was remembered.
Reporter Danielle Jester, who covered the events for the Siskiyou Daily News, noted the palpable absence of the late Steve Orloff, who was a UCCE farm advisor for Siskiyou County for 25 years. “Orloff's absence was noticeably felt throughout the day,” she wrote. “He passed away in October of 2017, and his influence in Siskiyou County's ag industry was very apparent, evidenced in part by the many mentions of his name and work throughout the day. IREC paid tribute to Orloff in the final page of its field day guide, which featured a full-page image of Orloff during a previous field day, with the words, ‘We miss you, Steve.'”

In the news article, Jester also wrote, “The information gleaned through research at the IREC can be invaluable to farmers and other researchers. Through its years of experimentation, the center has helped growers develop more effective practices in a wide range of areas, from determining the crops that will grow best in the local climate, to selecting the most economically viable crops for the region, to understanding the most effective ways to manage pests and disease.”

 

 

Posted on Wednesday, August 1, 2018 at 10:21 PM

New leaders named for three strategic initiatives

Jim Farrar
New leaders for three of the five UC ANR Strategic Initiatives have taken the helm for the three SI leaders who rotated off, effective Jan. 2.

Jim Farrar, director of UC Integrated Pest Management Program, succeeds Cheryl Wilen as leader for Endemic and Invasive Pests and Diseases (EIPD).

David Lile
David Lile, UCCE director in Lassen County, succeeds John Harper as leader for Sustainable and Natural Ecosystems (SNE).

Neil McRoberts, associate professor of plant pathology at UC Davis, and Deanne Meyer, UCCE specialist in animal science at UC Davis, succeed David Doll as co-leaders for Sustainable Food Systems (SFS).

Neil McRoberts
The strategic initiative leaders play a key role in unifying, communicating and advocating to promote the science and impact of the work of UC ANR. A key undertaking for the SI leaders in 2018 will be to revisit and evolve the role of the initiatives themselves, identifying how the strategic initiatives can better help us advance the UC ANR agenda of touching the lives of 40 million Californians.

Deanne Meyer
Wendy Powers, associate vice president, and Mark Bell, vice provost for strategic initiatives and statewide programs, thanked Wilen, Harper and Doll for their service as SI leaders.

Keith Nathaniel continues to lead the Healthy Families and Communities initiative and Doug Parker continues to lead the Water Quality, Quantity and Security initiative.

Posted on Tuesday, January 23, 2018 at 6:59 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Environment, Family, Food, Natural Resources, Pest Management

Thank you, and looking ahead for a great 2017!

Dear Colleagues,

As we wrap up 2016, I want to take a moment to thank you for everything you've done on behalf of UC ANR this year. Whether you are conducting research, organizing extension programs, teaching nutrition, leading volunteers or quietly working behind the scenes to support our various activities, your work makes a huge difference in the lives of all Californians.

In addition to those activities, many of you also took the time to give feedback to the recent strategic planning exercise, gathered to exchange ideas at the Research to Policy conference, or contributed to enhancing the UC ANR mission in many other ways.  A special thanks to the folks who chaired a committee, led a program team or served as county director – having strong, passionate leaders at every level of this organization is what makes us effective.

We are continuing to grow in numbers as hiring outpaces retirements. In 2016, 29 academics joined UC ANR and three more are poised to start in 2017. We also established four new endowed chairs with matching funds from UC President Janet Napolitano, the California Rice Research Board, the California Pistachio Research Board and, recently, the Orange County Farm Bureau. Thanks to the hard work of many stakeholders – both internal and external – we identified 26 academic positions (http://ucanr.edu/sites/anrstaff/files/253192.pdf) for a new round of hiring priorities over the next two years. 

At the request of President Napolitano, we've submitted a five-year plan for UC ANR that will help us operationalize the Strategic Vision 2025 in a very thoughtful and timely manner. The next step is to further develop specific action plans for implementation and ensure the financial stability to support our vision. After the winter break, we will share the plan with the UC ANR community, as well as external stakeholders, and invite additional input as we move forward.

I'm very excited about 2017!  Some great groundwork has been laid this past year to further enhance our ability to deliver the UC ANR mission and enjoy new partnerships. I hope you will have a chance to relax and enjoy the holidays with friends and family and return refreshed to tackle the challenges that await us in the new year.

Happy Holidays!

Glenda

Glenda Humiston
Vice President

 

Posted on Tuesday, December 20, 2016 at 2:16 PM

DANRIS-X launches into Project Board with webinar trainings

DANRIS-X has been updated and Project Board will open for 2018 reporting.

DANRIS-X has been updated and will eventually be replaced with the newly created Project Board for UCCE specialists and advisors. When DANRIS-X opens for reporting, users will see a reduced number of data fields and an aesthetic refresh.

Project Board will open for 2018 reporting and will have an improved user experience and simplified data entry. Special thanks to the Project Board Academic Advisory Committee and Project Team for their continued involvement. More information can be found at http://ucanr.edu/sites/anrstaff/Divisionwide_Planning/Program_Planning_and_Evaluation/DANRIS-X/.

Upcoming dates and action items:

CE Specialists

  • DANRIS-X opens Jan. 9
  • All CE specialists are invited to the Zoom webinar trainings offered on Jan. 20, from 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., or Jan. 24, from 2 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. Topics include an overview of the reporting system, what and why we report, etc.
  • Actions: Complete Annual Report for FY 2016 and Annual Plan for FY 2017 by March 6, 2017, at midnight.

CE Advisors

  • DANRIS-X opens on Feb. 2
  • All CE advisors are invited to the Zoom webinar trainings offered on Feb. 6, from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m., or Feb. 7, from 10 a.m. to 12 noon. Topics include an overview of the reporting system, what and why we report, etc.
  • Actions: Complete Annual Report & CASA for FY 2017 and Annual Plan for FY 2018 by Oct. 30, 2017, at midnight.

If you have questions or comments, please contact Kit Alviz, Program Planning and Evaluation, at kit.alviz@ucop.edu or (510) 987-0027.

 

 

Posted on Tuesday, December 20, 2016 at 2:14 PM

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