ANR Employees
University of California
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Posts Tagged: IGIS

California Adaptation Clearinghouse website launched

IGIS and the California Naturalist Program are pleased to help celebrate the launch of a new information portal on climate adaptation. The California Adaptation Clearinghouse was officially launched at the California Adaptation Forum in August in Sacramento. The site was developed by the Governor's Office of Planning and Research (OPR) in collaboration with the UC Berkeley Geospatial Innovation FacilityCalNat and IGIS.

The Clearinghouse is a database-driven platform with a wealth of curated resources for climate adaptation. The site originated out of Senate Bill 246, which mandates OPR to provide resources on climate adaptation for local governments, regional planning agencies, and other practitioners working on adaptation and resilience. The database also contains sea-level rise resources collected by the Ocean Protection Council under Assembly Bill 2516. It's an amazing resource for anyone looking to strengthen climate change preparedness in their local government, community, or business.

Topic categories in the Adaptation Clearinghouse

The database includes numerous planning resources that have been developed and vetted by experts in the field. For example, the Urban Sustainability Directors Network has a how-to guide for local governments on developing equitable, community-driven climate preparedness plans, which you can find in the Clearinghouse. There are also examples of vulnerability assessments, local plans, and funding strategies. The majority of resources are hosted by other organizations, but unlike a Google search all the resources in the Clearinghouse have been reviewed, annotated, and cataloged by subject matter specialists.

To help find resources, the Clearinghouse has a number of search options, including more than a dozen topic categories adapted from Safeguarding California, the state's overall roadmap for building climate change resiliency. You can also search by Type of Impact (e.g., drought, sea level rise), Resource Type (e.g., case study, assessment, policy guidance), and of course an interactive map. Each resource has a descriptive blurb so you can quickly find what you need.

Adaptation planning can be information intensive, so the Tools and Data section of the website is devoted to helping people find data and crunch the numbers. Interested in rangelands? Check out the CA Landscape Conservation Cooperative's compiled Threat Assessments to California Rangelands. Sea level rise? Perhaps the CosMos modeling tool from USGS, or the Surging Seas tool from Climate Central. Like all resources, each tool and dataset has a user-friendly description, a technical summary, a bit about the data, and links to the source. One of our favorites is the California Energy Commission's Cal-Adapt, which includes both historical and projected climate data downscaled for California.

Climate stories

Providing a more personal perspective, the Clearinghouse also contains stories about climate adaptation from individuals, community groups, and businesses. The stories were collected by the UC ANR California Naturalist Program and their vast network of certified naturalists. The climate stories are diverse and compelling, from a concerned grandmother who becomes engaged in a community choice energy program, to a solar project engineer working to strengthen measures to prevent heat stroke in field staff. An interactive Story Map developed by IGIS helps users find stories from their area, some of which even have audio or video clips so you can hear the story in the speaker's own words.

Climate adaptation is complicated, but information portals like the Clearinghouse allow anyone to tap into the incredible amount of work that has already been done in California and elsewhere. Rather than reinvent the wheel, local agencies can build upon vetted guidelines from similar areas. We are all fortunate that the State of California has invested in a platform to share curated resources for the long-term, because climate adaptation is already part of the new normal. More resources are in the pipeline, so check it out and then check back often to see what's new.

Posted on Tuesday, December 18, 2018 at 12:22 PM
  • Author: Andy Lyons
Focus Area Tags: Natural Resources

New interactive map identifies meeting and training facilities

Are you planning an ANR workshop, training, or meeting in an area of California unfamiliar to you? Now you can use the newly published online Interactive ANR Training & Facilities Map.

ANR business and office managers and assistants, IGIS (Robert Johnson, Sean Hogan and Shane Feirer) Program Support (Sherry Cooper) and Learning & Development (Jodi Azulai) collaborated to bring you this tool so that you can identify ANR training, workshop and meeting spaces across the state and identify information about:

  • Number of rooms in facility
  • Room capacity
  • Room arrangement availabilities
  • Accessibility
  • Parking availability
  • Nearest airports
  • Local lodging information
  • Catering recommendations
  • Who to contact to reserve your location
  • And other details

By using this map, you can also alleviate our very busy Program Support Unit and work directly with the location contact to help you reserve room(s). We would appreciate if you check out the information on your locations and see if you can provide us with any new details! To do so, contact Jodi Azulai at jlazulai@ucanr.edu or Robert Johnson at robjohnson@ucanr.edu.

Posted on Friday, November 30, 2018 at 7:17 PM

IGIS plans next steps based on program review

Glenda Humiston
In 2017, an ad hoc committee was appointed to carry out ANR's routine five-year statewide program review of our Informatics and Geographic Information Systems (IGIS) Program. Associate Vice President Powers and I extend a thank you to the committee for their time commitment and thoroughness in examining the program and providing recommendations to UC ANR's Program Council (PC). The time and effort of IGIS Director Maggi Kelly and staff to provide information and PC's review of the report and recommendations are also greatly appreciated.

Given limited personnel and a short time since startup, IGIS has made significant contributions throughout ANR. There is a great need for the program within and beyond ANR, and IGIS personnel have shown impressive results in reaching out to the wider ANR community and external partners.

Here is a summary of the direction and next steps I provided to the IGIS Program Director:

  • IGIS should focus on expanding capacity and reach with drones and prioritize investing in new technology.
  • IGIS will work with the REC Directors to develop a call process to identify science leads who are interested in taking over full ownership of one or more of the flux towers.
  • IGIS should discontinue its involvement with cataloguing dark data, but work with ANR Communication Services and Information Technology office (CSIT) to inform ANR academics that digitized documents are available in the ANR repository.
  • Associate Vice President Powers and I will meet with Program Director Kelly to further discuss the proposal to re-characterize IGIS from a statewide program to a statewide academic service.
  • IGIS will develop a business plan to continue to scale up services that are in demand by UC ANR academics and offer services in a way that decreases reliance on central funds.
  • IGIS should update its website to clearly articulate to whom resources and services are available. When IGIS is not able to provide a service, to the degree possible, it should act as a clearing house and refer clients to other providers.
  • IGIS should incorporate evaluation methods that focus on the effectiveness of workshops and services and the extent of IGIS' reach.

I look forward to working with IGIS as it pursues these and other opportunities that may arise.

Glenda Humiston
Vice President

Posted on Tuesday, April 3, 2018 at 12:20 PM
Focus Area Tags: Innovation

IGIS to host next ANR DroneCamp June 18-21

Sean Hogan, IGIS academic coordinator, gives instructions at drone camp.

The UCANR IGIS team will hold its next DroneCamp training June 18-21, 2018, at UC San Diego.

This bootcamp-style workshop will cover the full suite of steps and skills for using drones for mapping and data collection, including:

  • UAV (unmanned aerial vehicle) and sensor technology 
  • Principles of photogrammetry and remote sensing 
  • Safety and regulations 
  • Mission planning 
  • Flight operations including hands-on practice 
  • Data management, processing, and analysis 
  • Visualization 

The fee for this three-day workshop is $500 for University of California employees and students, and $900 for everyone else. A limited number of fee waivers are available based on need.

Additional information and registration information can be found at http://igis.ucanr.edu/dronecamp. Registration requires a short application (no fee) about your background and learning goals. Anyone interested in attending is encouraged to submit an application by April 15 for guaranteed early registration.

Posted on Saturday, March 24, 2018 at 10:52 AM
  • Author: Andy Lyons
Focus Area Tags: Innovation

Apply for IGIS drone bootcamp by April 15

The Informatics and Geographic Information Systems (IGIS) Statewide Program will hold a three-day "Dronecamp" to be held July 25-27, 2017, in Davis. This bootcamp style workshop will provide "A to Z" training in using drones for research and resource management, including photogrammetry and remote sensing, safety and regulations, mission planning, flight operations (including 1/2 day of hands-on practice), data processing, analysis and visualization.

The workshop content will help participants prepare for the FAA Part 107 Remote Pilot exam. Participants will also hear about the latest technology and trends from researchers and industry representatives.

Dronecamp builds upon a series of workshops that have been developed by IGIS and Sean Hogan starting in 2016.

“Through these workshops and our experiences with drone research, we've learned that the ability to use mid-range drones as scientifically robust data collection platforms requires a proficiency in a diverse set of skills and knowledge that exceeds what can be covered in a traditional workshop,” said Hogan. “Dronecamp aims to cover all the bases, helping participants make a great leap forward in their own drone programs.”

Dronecamp is open to all, but will have a focus on applications in agriculture and natural resources. No experience is necessary. The number of seats is limited, so all interested participants must apply before they can register. Applications are due on April 15, 2017. For further information, please visit http://igis.ucanr.edu/dronecamp/.

Posted on Friday, March 17, 2017 at 12:33 PM
 
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