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Posts Tagged: Oak Woodlands

Presentation proposals for California Oak Symposium due Aug. 10

The 8th California Oak Symposium is scheduled to be held March 22-25, 2021, at Embassy Suites, San Luis Obispo. The theme for the conference is “Sustaining Oak Woodlands Under Current and Future Conditions.” 

Presented by UC Agriculture and Natural Resources, the 8th California Oak Symposium is intended for anyone involved in research, education, management and conservation of California's oak woodlands. Participants may include foresters, range managers, tribes, arborists, landowners, community groups, land trusts and policymakers.

UC ANR colleagues are invited to share their oak-related work. To propose an oral presentation or poster for consideration, please submit an abstract at http://ucanr.edu/8thoakabstracts by Aug. 10.

View the symposium agenda at http://ucanr.edu/files/331101.docx

A Symposium Planning Committee and the UC ANR Program Support Unit are organizing the symposium and monitoring the new coronavirus (COVID-19) conditions so conference details may change.

“We will go virtual if COVID-19 regulations are still in place in March,” said Bill Tietje, UC Cooperative Extension specialist and chair of the planning committee.

Registration will open in the fall. For more information, visit https://ucanr.edu/sites/oaksymposium or contact Tietje at tietje@berkeley.edu.

 

 

Posted on Tuesday, July 28, 2020 at 1:34 PM

Hundreds sign up for online oak woodland workshop

California oak woodlands are highly prized ecoregions where stately trees, many of them hundreds of years old, are cornerstones of a habitat for wildlife and native plants. Sadly, some of these ecosystems are seriously threatened by exotic pests and diseases, encroachment by less desirable vegetation, and wildfire.

Each year, UC Cooperative Extension hosts workshops to share scientific developments aimed at conserving these important habitats – and the economic value of ranching – on oak woodlands, which are found on the lower elevation slopes of the Sierra Nevada, the Coast Range and other foothill areas of California.

Typically, the workshops are held in person and draw moderate-sized audiences for presentations, questions and answers, and field trips. Because of the COVID-19 pandemic, this year's workshop was offered online in April with pre-recorded presentations available for viewing at the participants' convenience and a live question-and-answer session on Zoom.

The retooled event garnered 500 registrants, over 300 views of the YouTube videos and 140 participants in the live Q&A session. The presentations and Q&A session are still available online for future viewing as well.

“People from all walks of life participated, including those with professional and personal interest in oak woodlands,” said Yana Valachovic, UCCE forest advisor in Humboldt and Del Norte counties and a conference organizer.

UCCE research on the impact of conifer encroachment helped facilitate policy changes that make it easier for California landowners to remove conifers from oak woodlands. Photo by Yana Valachovic

Presentations at the 2020 conference included the following topics:

Encroachment by Douglas-fir

In Northern California, the biodiversity of oak woodlands is being threatened by Douglas-fir encroachment. The oaks' shade helps the young conifers get established with protection from harsh sun. In time, the fast-growing Douglas-fir trees pierce the oak canopies and begin to crowd out the areas' native understories, which are important for the diversity of birds, mammals and reptiles attracted to oaks.

As the Douglas-fir continue to grow and multiply, they threaten the very lives of the oak trees and the unique ecosystem they dominate.

To better understand the Douglas-fir encroachment, Valachovic established 10 research sites in Humboldt and Mendocino counties to gather information about the fate and the age of oaks. She and her research partners determined the ages of the oaks and firs, and counted the seedlings, saplings, snags and understory vegetation.

“With this research, we were able to demonstrate that even though the oak trees can be smaller in diameter they are much older than the Douglas-fir trees,” Valachovic said. “The encroachment process is happening quickly, and the oaks are falling out of the system.”

The shift appears to have been initiated in the mid-19th and early-20th centuries, coinciding with the Gold Rush and wildfire suppression.

With the data confirming Douglas-fir encroachment, Valachovic turned her attention to oak woodland restoration. At 14 sites in Humboldt and Trinity counties, her team studied the effects of Douglas-fir removal.

“Grasses and forbs under the oaks reestablished. Diameter growth on the oaks increased,” she said.

These research findings contributed directly to changes in policy that had previously limited land owners' ability to remove and sell conifers encroaching on oak woodland. The research also helped create new funding opportunities to support oak woodland restoration and conservation in Northern California.

The River Fire, which burned through much of the UC Hopland Research and Extension Center in 2018, provided many opportunities to study the regenerative aspects of fire on oak woodland.

Case study of oak woodland wildfire recovery

In July 2018, about two-thirds of the 5,289-acre UC Hopland Research and Extension Center was burned by the River Fire.

The transformation of the land, which had likely been without a large wildland fire for at least 100 years, was intense and stressful, said UC Cooperative Extension forest advisor Michael Jones. However, it also provided a unique opportunity for researchers to compare the impact of wildfire on the resiliency of vegetation on grazed and ungrazed oak woodland.

Jones established 35 one-fifth acre research plots at the research center and collected data two months following the fire and one year later. The research will continue in the future to better understand long-term impacts, but Jones was able to share revealing early results at the workshop.

Right after the fire, in severely burned areas areas, the future of the oaks looked ominous. Jones predicted 40% tree mortality.

“The oaks were exposed to persistent, intense heat. They were cooked,” he said. “But two months after the fire, we were already seeing basal sprouts. This was an amazing response by the trees. Oaks are pretty damn tough.”

A year after the fire, surveys showed that tree mortality in the burned areas was 25%, much less than Jones' early predictions. While some management for specific situations in severely burned areas may be necessary – such as removal of hazard trees, reducing fuels in defensible spaces or removal to control invasive species – the results of this work show the trees recover naturally.

“Esthetically, I know these systems aren't as pleasing as they were before, but ecologically, they are healthy and recovering,” he said. “In 100 years, it will look just as good as before the fire.”

John Bailey, right, director of the UC Hopland Research and Extension, speaks with UC ANR vice provost Mark Lagrimini where fire impact was evident shortly after the River Fire.The pasture on the left of the fence was grazed, the area on the right was not grazed.

Fire impacts in woodland areas previously grazed and not grazed

The fire on the research station also permitted Jones to compare the fire's differing impact on non-grazed and grazed oak woodland. At first, the grazed areas looked almost unscathed with minimal flame scorching on the bark, while an area where the pasture hadn't been grazed for 25 years had evidence of much higher severity fire.

“Grazing is a phenomenal way to help manage fuels,” Jones said. However, the grazed areas displayed ecological shortcomings a year later.

“In grazed pastures, the large mature trees were still alive, but there was no oak regeneration (basal sprouting or seedlings),” Jones said. “In the ungrazed area, a lot of biomass had been killed, but there's nearly 100% resprout of oak trees and we have an impressive amount of oak seedling recruitment.”

Jones said he isn't discouraging grazing.

“But it is important to protect sites from grazing, and especially wildlife browse, when a landowner or land managers' objectives are to regenerate or conserve oak woodlands,” Jones said.

A ball point pen points to a Mediterranean Oak Borer, indicating its tiny size.

New ambrosia beetle another threat to California oaks

Akif Eskalen, UC Cooperative Extension specialist in the Department of Plant Pathology at UC Davis, has identified a new insect-fungus team that causes oak borer wilt in Northern California Valley and Blue Oaks. It is an ambrosia beetle, commonly known as Mediterranean Oak Borer, which carries several fungi in its mouth. The beetle bores into the tree and introduces fungi to grow for food. The fungi spreads and disturbs the transportation of water and nutrients, causing wilt in the tree.

The oozing and staining lesions on the bark are similar to other oak fungal diseases, such as Sudden Oak Death. The beetle – native of Mediterranean basin countries in Africa, Asia and Europe – cannot fly far, so most likely is transported for long distances on infested firewood.

During the workshop, Eskalen suggested not moving firewood, removing heavily infested trees and chipping infested wood into 1-inch particles to reduce the spread of the ambrosia beetle and its fungal partner. He asked viewers to report any suspected oak tree infestations to the local agricultural commissioner, CDFA Diagnostic Laboratories, UC Cooperative Extension advisors or CALFIRE. Chemical options for sparing oaks from the ambrosia beetles' devastation are under investigation.

A botanical specimen of Ione manzanita, a federally listed threatened species, is susceptible to root rot caused by introduced Phytophthora in its natural range. (Photo: Wikimedia Commons)

Threats to oaks and other native plants from root rotting Phytophthora

Restoration plantings have inadvertently introduced plant pathogens to native oak woodland  ecosystems in California, said Ted Swiecki of Phytosphere Research, an organization that provides consulting services related to natural resource management, horticulture, urban forestry, and agriculture. The group of pathogens causing the damage are largely from the Phytophthora genus, first described in the 1860s. The name translates from Greek to “plant destroyer.” 

Swiecki has observed when Phytophthora infested plants and soils are introduced to native habitats, the pathogens can attack various native plants, including toyon, madrone, manzanita and full-grown oaks. Once established, the pathogen can spread along drainages, by moving soil from one area to another and by hitchhiking on equipment, tires and hiking boots.

The pathogen can easily be overlooked at nurseries, which, by their nature, have conditions that favor Phytophthora development. Plants at nurseries are well watered, have high root density and are often placed on the ground where they can pick up pathogens.

He said the best approach to tackling Phytophthora is not using nursery stock for restoration or beautification of natural oak woodland. Direct seeding, using natural regeneration, or onsite propagation are safer ways to enhance vegetation in oak woodland.

“It's easier to prevent Phytophthora from being introduced in the first place and much cheaper and more effective than trying to eradicate it later,” Siewcki said.

Posted on Tuesday, April 28, 2020 at 11:34 AM
Focus Area Tags: Environment

PAC discusses ANR Advisory Committee recommendations

President Janet Napolitano thanked Don Bransford and everyone who provided information to the UC ANR Advisory Committee. She announced she would be moving forward on the committee's recommendations.

The UC ANR Advisory Committee, appointed by President Janet Napolitano to consider options for UC ANR's structure, governance and funding, submitted its recommendations to her, Don Bransford told the UC President's Advisory Commission on Agriculture and Natural Resources (PAC), which met Dec. 18 at the DoubleTree by Hilton in Berkeley.

PAC Chair Bransford, who also served on the UC ANR Advisory Committee, said the committee saw opportunities to strengthen governance, increase budgetary transparency, provide more stable and predictable funding models and enhance collaborations between UC ANR and UC's broader academic and research enterprise.

The committee, which included deans Kathryn Uhrich of the UCR College of Natural and Agricultural Sciences and Michael Lairmore of the School of Veterinary Medicine at UC Davis, consulted internal and external stakeholders, then conducted its own analyses in consultation with UC ANR leaders.

The committee made four key recommendations:

  1. Maintain UC ANR's status as a systemwide program within UCOP, reporting to the president.
  2. Create a UC ANR governing council for oversight and to promote greater understanding of UC ANR across the university.
  3. Create a funding model using a combination of the “set-aside” and “corridor” models.
  4. Retain campus oversight of and reporting responsibility for state Agricultural Experiment Station funds.

Napolitano told the PAC she would be moving forward on the recommendations because she thinks they will ensure ANR greater budget stability, a broader understanding of ANR across the UC system and create more opportunities for collaboration between ANR and campus academics. She issued a statement Dec. 19 on her decisions for UC ANR.

Uhrich said she sees the governing council as an “opportunity to educate, integrate and be inclusive” to have people from across the UC system and outside of UC participating.

UC expertise

In other discussions, Napolitano commended ANR employees for their responses to the Camp Fire and Woolsey Fire, noting that employees and volunteers lost homes in the devastating wildfires.

At a recent meeting with some legislators to discuss automation and the future of work, wildfire, health issues and homelessness, Napolitano said the policymakers told her they want to hear more from UC experts to help them think through policy challenges.

One commissioner commented, “We're going to have more fires, more foodborne illness outbreaks. Let's have our folks out there to talk to media and have them wearing a UC shirt.”

Napolitano replied, “I like the idea of folks wearing UC garb when they're on TV.”

Budget

During her budget presentation, Humiston said ANR must slow its use of reserve funds and develop new funding sources.

Humiston and Tu Tran, associate vice president for business operations, briefed the PAC on ANR's budget. Administrative costs are up this fiscal year to invest $4 million to join UCPath, the new systemwide payroll and personnel system. UC ANR has begun the transition and will go live in March-April. “Ultimately UCPath will save us money, but it's costing us now,” Humiston said.

Due to budget constraints, Humiston explained that UC ANR isn't offering competitive grants nor announcing UCCE positions to be filled in 2018-19. Recruitment for previously approved positions is ongoing and new hiring will begin as resources become available to make the long-term commitment to support positions.

In her budget PowerPoint presentation for the PAC, Humiston listed actions ANR has taken in the past to compensate for budget cuts and steps that will be taken in FY 2018-19.

Tran explained that UC ANR relies on six sources of funds – state, federal, county, extramural, endowments and income from gifts, patents, investments and program fees. State funds, which constitute the largest portion of the division's funding, pay for employee salaries and benefits. He noted government funding is highly volatile so “we are trying to raise money in other ways.”

California Agricultural Resources Archive

UC Merced's librarian HaiPeng Li, project archivist Lisa Valens and project director Emily Lin gave a presentation on the California Agricultural Resources Archive or CARA. The UC Cooperative Extension archive project, which was launched after UC Cooperative Extension's centennial in 2014, started with UCCE in Merced, Humboldt and Ventura counties. The team has been digitizing annual reports and historical photos to make them accessible to the public and researchers.

“The data isn't just history,” Humiston asserted. “There are notes on research that may hold the key to something like huanglongbing.”

Mining the data, advanced analysis and linking to other information might open new avenues of research, she said.

UC ANR is seeking partners and trying to raise funds for the archive project. Jim Downing, publications director, will assume leadership of the project to succeed Jan Corlett, chief of staff to the vice president, who plans to retire in July.

Deans' updates

The School of Veterinary Medicine is planning to build a Livestock & Field Services Center.

To help students with career planning, Helene Dillard, dean of the UC Davis College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, said she seeks UCCE advisors to show students the research and outreach being done in the counties and planning a course on Cooperative Extension to introduce students to career options. She is in talks to partner with UC Davis medical center on health research such as the connection between diet and disease.

David Ackerly, dean of the UC Berkeley College of Natural Resources, announced the recent hiring of new Cooperative Extension specialists Ellen Bruno for policy analysis and Rob York for fire and policy, and that he is striving to create new faculty positions that will not depend on state money. He also announced that UC Cooperative Extension specialist Adina Merenlender received a $5 million gift to train California climate stewards through a program similar to California Naturalist. Ackerly also noted that Giannini Hall is closing temporarily for seismic upgrades so faculty and staff are packing to move out during construction.

Katherine Uhrich, dean of the UC Riverside College of Natural and Agricultural Sciences, announced CNAS has hired 24 faculty this year including two Nobel laureates – Richard Shrock and Barry Barish. She also announced that Givaudan, a Swiss company that creates fragrances and flavors, is donating funds to cover UCR's citrus variety collection, to protect the trees from pests and diseases.

Michael Lairmore, dean of the School of Veterinary Medicine at UC Davis, announced that his veterinary team worked tirelessly treating animals injured during the Camp Fire, taking in 70 animals, most of which have returned to their families. About $2 million has been donated to offset the costs of treating the animals. Veterinarian Jamie Peyton covered burns on cats and dogs with tilapia skin to help with healing and has a provisional patent for the fish skin treatment. Lairmore also announced the school is planning to build a Livestock and Field Service Center. “We are in need of donations and there are naming opportunities for interested individuals or companies,” Lairmore told PAC members. He also announced the hiring of Emmanuel Okello, the new UCCE specialist in antimicrobial stewardship.

The PAC, which meets twice a year, will meet next in the spring.

Names in the News

Bruno named dairy advisor in Fresno and Madera counties

Daniela Bruno

Daniela Bruno joined UCCE on Nov. 5, 2018, as the area dairy advisor in Fresno and Madera counties.

Bruno completed a Ph.D. in comparative pathology from UC Davis and a DVM from The Federal University of Minas Gerais, Brazil.

Throughout her professional and academic career, Bruno has carried out work related to animal health and welfare, food safety, milk quality, wastewater and dairy systems management. Prior to joining UCCE, Dr. Bruno was a technical services specialist/dairy advisor at DeLaval, Inc. where she provided technical support with trainings, webinars and newsletters to local California dairies and worldwide. She worked closely to field veterinarians and consultants troubleshooting problems at dairies assuring the food supply is safe. Bruno, who is fluent in Portuguese, provided oversight on field clinical trials for products developed for the U.S. and global market.

She collaborated with CSU Fresno and UC Davis in several projects, including studies on animal health, mastitis and milk quality, hoof diseases and calf management and the results from these studies have been presented at National and International meetings such as National Mastitis Council meetings, Lameness in Ruminants Conference and at the World Buiatrics Congress. From 2009 to 2012, Bruno was a dairy specialist/microbiologist at Texas A&M Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory. There, she oversaw dairy specimens on performing diagnostic testing and assisting field veterinarians with troubleshooting problems at their client dairies. She also worked closely with the Texas A&M Extension team, providing training on milk quality and mastitis control to herdsmen and other dairy employees, helping them to be more effective in all aspects of dairy management.

Bruno is based in Fresno and can be reached at (559) 241-7552, (559) 241-7515 and dfbruno@ucanr.edu.

Okello named UCCE specialist in antimicrobial stewardship

Emmanuel Okello

Emmanuel Okello joined the Department of Population Health and Reproduction as Assistant Specialist in Cooperative Extension in antimicrobial stewardship on Nov. 1, 2018.

Prior to accepting his UCCE position, Okello was a postdoctoral research scholar at the Veterinary Medicine Teaching and Research Center, gaining valuable epidemiological experience on dairy production units conducting studies on selective dry cow treatment and surveys of anti-microbial resistance. This has enabled him the opportunity to establish good working relationships with extension specialists, dairy owners, herd managers, farm workers, veterinary practitioners and researchers across California.

Working with farmers and other stakeholders to improve livestock health and productivity, Okello will develop antimicrobial stewardship guidelines and best management practices for veterinarians, livestock owners and their employees that reduce antimicrobial resistance yet maintain healthy herds and flocks.

Okello earned his veterinary degree (DVM equivalent) from Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda, a master's in molecular biology from Katholieke University Leuven, in Belgium and a Ph.D. in bio-engineering sciences from Vrije University Brussel in Belgium.

Okello is based at the Veterinary Medicine Teaching and Research Center in Tulare and can be reached at (559) 688-1731, ext. 267, and eokello@ucdavis.edu.

 

Posted on Friday, December 21, 2018 at 9:01 AM

Learning & Development

 


WebANR
Communicating Your Story: LinkedIn
Date:
Thursday January 3, 2019

Time: 10 a.m.-11 a.m.

Zoom link:
https://ucanr.zoom.us/j/751701428 [Corrected link 1/3/19]
1 669 900 6833 or +1 646 558 8656
Webinar ID: 751 701 428

Presenters: Rose Hayden-Smith and Surendra Dara

Many of us think of LinkedIn as a professional networking tool. But with a powerful publishing platform and an ability to post links, it's also an ideal place to share your ANR story and grow a network of people who are interested in your work. In this fast-paced webinar, we'll cover the basics of building a great LinkedIn profile, publishing posts and more, including:

  • Techniques and best practices to use the platform most effectively
  • Publishing a blog post on LinkedIn
  • Finding your online community
  • Tips to manage your LinkedIn account efficiently

Participants will also be provided access to a range of resources and tools to support their LinkedIn efforts, including samples, tip and FAQ sheets, guidelines and more.

 

WebANR
Communicating Your Story: Blogging Basics

Date: Thursday, January 10, 2019
Time: 10 a.m.-11 a.m.
Zoom link:
https://ucanr.zoom.us/j/751701428 [Corrected link 1/3/19]
669 900 6833 or 646 558 8656
Webinar ID: 344 294 468

 Presenter: Rose Hayden-Smith

 This will be a streamed recording with live Q&A.

 In this fast-paced webinar, we'll cover the basics of communicating your story through blogging, including:

  • Why you should blog
  • Techniques and best practices to get started…or get better
  • Crafting catchy headlines and smart ledes
  • Using images and video to enhance your posts
  • Using your blog on the ANR website and on other publishing platforms, including LinkedIn
  • Quick tips for effectively using sitebuilder

Participants will also be provided access to a range of resources and tools to support their blogging efforts, including samples, tip and FAQ sheets, guidelines and more.

WebANR
Please Step Away from the Podium: Strategies for supporting adult learners

Date: Thursday January 17, 2019
Time: noon-12:30 p.m.
Zoom link:
https://ucanr.zoom.us/j/751701428 [Corrected link 1/3/19]

669 900 6833 or 646 558 8656
Webinar ID: 963 167 636

Presenter: Lynn Brock

Simple steps you can take to:

  • Create workshops, trainings or classes that are engaging and memorable
  • Facilitate sessions where learners feel included, respected, and motivated

WebANR
Measuring and Communicating Impacts of UC Master Gardener Program: Statewide outcome evaluation Year 1 findings

Date: Wednesday, January 30, 2019
Time:
11 a.m.-noon
Zoom link:
https://ucanr.zoom.us/j/751701428

669 900 6833 or +1 646 558 8656
Webinar ID: 751 701 428

Presenters: Kit Alviz, Missy Gable, Tamekia Wilkins and Katherine Webb-Martinez

Participants will gain:

  • Understanding of the UC Master Gardener Program's statewide outcome evaluation design, year one findings and lessons learned
  • Understanding of feasibility for an ANR program to collect follow-up survey responses (3 months post event; 30%+ response rate)
  • Examples of how behavior change outcomes can be communicated in relation to ANR condition changes

Lessons learned from data collection and analysis that can be considered for other statewide and academic programs

WebANR
Communicating Your Story: Instagram

Date: January 24, 2019
Time: 10a.m.-11 a.m.
Zoom link:
https://ucanr.zoom.us/j/751701428 [Corrected link 1/3/19]
669 900 6833 or 646 558 8656
                            Webinar ID: 509 908 913

Presenters: Rose Hayden-Smith and Dan Macon

Instagram is a photo- and video-sharing social networking service. It's an ideal place to share your ANR story. In this fast-paced webinar, we'll cover the basics of using Instagram, building a great profile, publishing posts and more, including:

  • Techniques and best practices to use the platform most effectively
  • A few quick tips for using your smart phone to shoot pictures and video (and for posting)
  • Finding your online community and building an audience for your work
  • Tips to manage your Instagram account efficiently

Participants will also be provided access to a range of resources and tools to support their Instagram efforts, including samples, tip and FAQ sheets, guidelines and more.

WebANR
Communicating Your Story: Facebook Essentials
Date:
January 31, 2019
Time: 10-11am
Zoom link:
https://ucanr.zoom.us/j/751701428 [Corrected link 1/3/19]
                        669 900 6833 or 646 558 8656
                        Webinar ID: 461 004 579

Presenter: Rose Hayden-Smith

Facebook has become an important part of communicating our stories. Ever wonder if the platform is right for you? In this fast-paced webinar, we'll cover the basics of communicating your story through Facebook, including:

  • Why you might want to use Facebook
  • Techniques and best practices to get started…or get better
  • Using images and video to enhance your posts
  • Quick tips for effectively and efficiently using the site

Participants will also be provided access to a range of resources and tools to support their Facebook efforts, including samples, tip and FAQ sheets, guidelines and more.

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Webinar and in-person:
Stellar interview techniques

Date: Thursday, Jan. 24, 2019

Tell me about yourself,” is often the first of many interview questions. Have you ever struggled with answering this question or others in an interview? Are you unsure about how to share your accomplishments? The STAR interview technique (STAR stands for Situation, Task, Action and Result) can help you provide concrete examples of your experience and skills for the job. In this workshop, discover the best ways to use the STAR technique to prepare for a successful interview.

In person (UC Davis) and also available via webinar:

Time: Noon-1 p.m. 
Zoom link:
https://zoom.us/j/439807305
669 900 6833 or 646 876 9923
Meeting ID: 439 807 305

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Collaborative Facilitation Group Process Tools Workshop

Please let us know if you are interested (interest survey) in participating in the next Collaborative Facilitation and Group Process Tools Workshop.

It is open to all UC ANR academic and staff employees, including Statewide Program volunteers. The training is limited to 25 participants. Priority will be given to people who have not already taken a facilitation training through ANR (such as Essential Facilitation). 

Date: March 25 and 26, 2019; and June 24, 2019
Location: Davis, CA

This two-day (March), in-person training will be followed by a follow up, one-day (June) in-person training.

Desired Outcomes:

  • To learn collaborative facilitation techniques
  • To increase the effectiveness and efficiency of your collaborative processes
  • To increase your comfort level in applying facilitation skills

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UC Women's Initiative for Professional Development

This year, nine ANR women graduated from the UC Women's Initiative for Professional Development (UC WI). This experiential professional development program for women was designed to elevate women in leadership, establish a pipeline for advancement, and contribute to women's and UC's success. ANR's graduates are:

  • Lisa Blecker, associate director, Pesticide Safety Education Program and Office of Pesticide Information and Coordination
  • Vanity Campbell, proposal development coordinator, Office of Contracts and Grants
  • Mary Ciricillo, director, California 4-H Foundation
  • Trisha Dinh, financial manager, Youth, Families, and Communities
  • Sabrina Drill, natural resources advisor, UCCE Ventura
  • Jennifer Heguy, advisor, UCCE Merced
  • Kat Hicklin, business officer, South Coast REC and UCCE Orange
  • Sonia Scott, administrative officer, UCOP
  • Allison Smith, principal agriculture technician

Several graduates shared their experience on how the program impacted them.

Lisa Blecker: The UC WI allowed us to focus on what it was we want out of our time at UC and gave us tools to explore different ways we could get there. I didn't go into the program to do bigger and better things in my job or with aspirations of a promotion. I realized while in UC WI that what I wanted most was to find a better work-life balance, so I can be happier at work and at home. I have the tools I need to make progress towards that goal.

Vanity Campbell: The UC WI program was an incredible, life-changing experience that challenged and prompted individual growth through collective engagement with women across the UC system. The resulting impactful experience and established UC community has rippled through my professional and personal life, changing my approach to how I communicate, coach others, seek out and provide mentorship, present myself, and think about professional success. This pivotal process peeled-back layers that revealed insight into self and revived an awareness of my own strengths, possibilities, and opportunities to advance my passions – life's work. My thinking is renewed and liberated, which has changed how I see and approach workplace obstacles as well as unforeseen prospects. By change, I mean empowered! I am excited for the positive change that I'll effect around me, the meaningful impact that I will achieve, and the bold opportunities I will create.

Mary Ciricillo: The UC WI professional development conference enabled me to think more broadly about my career within the UC system. Not only did this experience provide me with an amazing network of women throughout California, it gave me the tools to expand upon and improve my skill sets in the workplace. I would highly recommend this conference to women looking to strengthen their performance in their current position as well as those who have long term aspirations to elevate their career.

 

Trisha Dinh: UC WI was a great learning experience. It was empowering to have had the opportunity to be surrounded by women with diverse backgrounds and roles across the different UC campuses and learned their leadership styles and how they empower people in both their job and community. With the training, I was able to incorporate many of the management and leadership tools to apply to both my professional and personal settings, and to apply work/life balance.

Sabrina Drill: The most valuable part of the training, for me, was getting to know so many amazing women from across the UC spectrum – I especially enjoyed getting a better understanding of all the work our dedicated staff do to keep the university running.                                                          

Alison Smith: The UCWIP made me consider the future of my career when I never had before. I had never thought much about my own career development or searching out mentors and sponsors. I now am actively spending time thinking about the future of my career and steps I can take to constantly improve myself as a team member, speaker, workshop leader, etc. I am building the tools to advance my career, my self-worth as a part of UC ANR and my team here at Hansen REC.

 
Sonia Scott: The UC/Coro Women's Initiative was a great opportunity for professional and personal growth. It gave me the opportunity to meet and interview senior UC leaders, develop a professional narrative that really boils down the essence of who I am and what I do, collaborate with brilliant women across many fields throughout the UC system, and stay in touch with a them as a supportive network for questions and challenges.
 
 

 

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ANR people managers recommend supervisor training

Being an effective and professional people manager takes many skills and considerable development and the best people managers develop both their employees and themselves.

One of the ways ANR people managers have been developing themselves is by completing UC People Management Series Certificate modules and participating in monthly facilitated networking calls to review what they've learned, ask other supervisors for advice, and share successes. Participants enjoy scenario-based role-playing, a fun and challenging group assignment, and networking. Interested in our 2019 networking calls? Fill out this survey.

Four people who have graduated from the UC People Management Series comment on their experiences.

Kari Arnold, CE advisor, UCCE Stanislaus: The UC People Management Series helped me think about how to interact with employees and colleagues in ways that are welcoming and understanding. I feel more confident in a management role knowing how to communicate productively with others.

Kendra Lewis, academic coordinator, 4-H: I highly recommend that all my ANR supervisor colleagues take this series and participate in the networking cohort.

Ron Walker, senior systems administrator, CSIT: Being a member of the UC People Networking Cohort has been/continues to be an extreme honor and privilege. Each member is encouraged to enjoy best practice sharing and World-Class management techniques, in addition to experiencing the diverse and unique nature of our organization. All discussions are raw/unfiltered and feature real world situations/solutions while maintaining privacy and confidentiality. I always learn something new, and my opinions/contributions are welcomed and invigorated. Special thanks to Jodi and team for fostering this exceptional collection; I look forward to our continued growth and synergy.                                                                                          

Petr Kosina, content developer, UC IPM: The monthly networking calls helped me to be on track with required online courses. For me, the most useful were discussions on giving and receiving feedback and conducting performance appraisals which were well-timed so that I was able to almost immediately test in practice some of the suggested approaches and best practices.

 

 

 

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How to build game-changing rapport (with your employees)
Lynda.com

Simple communication is just a transaction, an exchange of mere words, which anyone can do. It's not that impressive. Now, in contrast, rapport is about building a bond. It's about sharing not just words, but feelings and emotions as well. So, why should you care? Because the next level of rapport establishes stronger connections, deeper relationships, and that almost always leads to higher productivity and better retention.

To start injecting more of that next-level conversation into your team, learn more here: How to Build Game-Changing Rapport.

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SAVE THE DATE: UC ANR Programmatic Orientation

Tuesday, April 23 - Thursday, April 25, 2019
Kearney Agricultural Research & Extension Center (KARE)
Parlier, CA

The UC ANR Programmatic Orientation will be taking place April 23 - 25, 2019. The orientation is designed to help academics jump start their programs by focusing on program design and showcasing successful projects of other ANR academics.

Who should attend: Open to all early career UC Cooperative Extension advisors, UC Cooperative Extension specialists, academic coordinators, academic administrators and Agricultural Experiment Station faculty who were unable to attend in the past.

SAVE THE DATE: New Administrative Academic and Staff Orientation

Thursday, May 30, 2019
10 a.m. – 3 p.m.
UC ANR Building, 2801 Second Street, Davis, CA 95618

Who should attend the UC ANR Administrative New Academic and Staff Orientation: All UC ANR Employees (academics, staff and affiliated staff on campuses, counties and RECs) who have not participated in an administrative orientation in the past. Priority will be given to those hired by ANR within the past year.

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Lynda.com upgrading to LinkedIn Learning 
ANR Lynda.com account users will be upgraded to LinkedIn Learning in January! During the week of Jan. 14, users will receive an email showing that you have been upgraded. In the email, you'll be asked to accept your new LinkedIn Learning account. What will you find in your upgrade?

  • A new intuitive interface
  • Course links to related external content
  • The ability to connect your LinkedIn profile to LinkedIn Learning
  • Increased learner engagement
  • Personalized course recommendations
Posted on Wednesday, December 19, 2018 at 3:24 PM
 
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Webmaster Email: jewarnert@ucanr.edu