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Position Details

262 Mosquito Control Specialist

Contacts

Associated Documents

Status

This proposal has been formally submitted for the 2012 cycle.

Comments

28 Comments

1
This position would be very important to Mosquito Control in California. Especially in light of the loss of our liasons Dr.s Reisen and Walton.
Posted May 25, 2012 2:11 PM by Tim Phillips
2
The Greater Los Angeles County Vector Control District strongly supports the creation of a Mosquito Control Specialist Position. Continuous vector and vectorborne disease related research has never been more important to the protection of public health in California then in light of today's ever increasing globalization. Close cooperation and communication between UC researchers and Mosquito and Vector Control agencies is paramount. The discharing of Drs Reisen and Walton from their duties as official ANR liaisons with the state's vector control agencies has completely severed a relationship that has helped to protect California residents from vectorborne diseases for more than half a century. The proposed position would facilitate the continuation of information flow between the UC system, the State Health Department and Vector Control Agencies, and allow us to efficiently and effectively collaborate on combating local outbreaks of vectorborne diseases emerging world wide.

The proposed Mosquito Control Specialist position is a critical position needed to protect the health and safety of California residents and should be funded.

Kenneth L Bayless
General Manager,
Greater Los Angeles County Vector Control District
Posted May 30, 2012 12:54 PM by Kenneth L Bayless
3
The Mosquito and Vector Control Association of California (MVCAC) strongly supports the creation of a Mosquito Control Specialist Position. As the statewide association representing mosquito and vector control districts, MVCAC feels strongly that vector and vectorborne disease related research is a priority to support its members' commitment to protecting public health and the environment. MVCAC has a history of working closely with UC researchers but over the past few years it has been challenged with the apparent elimination of any support for mosquito research done in the past by Drs Reisen and Walton and greatly valued by MVCAC members. The proposed position would support the continuation of information flow between the UC system, the California Department of Public Health and our members to efficiently and effectively collaborate on combating local outbreaks of vectorborne diseases emerging world wide.

MVCAC believes the proposed Mosquito Control Specialist position is a critical position that needs to be funded to protect the health and safety of California residents.
Posted Jun 8, 2012 10:06 AM by Catherine Smith
4
[This comment was deleted]
Posted Jun 11, 2012 3:51 PM by [Deleted]
5
Since the retirement of Dr. BF Eldridge as Director of the UC Mosquito Research Program there has been a gradual, but continual, erosion of UC faculty interaction and research collaboration with the Mosquito and Vector Control Association of California [MVCAC] and the California Department of Public Health [CDPH]. This has been evidenced by decreasing UC faculty attendance at the MVCAC annual conference and quarterly business meetings. This decreased participation comes at a time when the challenges for mosquito control to protect the public health and foster a comfortable use of the outdoors has increased due to the invasion of California by West Nile virus and the Asian Tiger mosquito, and to increased regulation and oversight on the use of insecticides by the EPA and other agencies.

The requested Mosquito Control Specialist position could reverse this trend, serve as a liason among UC, MVCAC and CDPH, and initiate a new future of enhanced collaboration, support and outreach by ANR. The new specialist would integrate well with several of the new ANR strategic initiatives, especially those dealing with water usage and invasive species. The specialist would identify areas for research and development needed for mosquito control, interest and coordinate participation by UC faculty, and thereby help to limit the impact of vectorborne pathogens on public, veterinary and wildlife health.
Posted Jun 11, 2012 3:55 PM by William Reisen
6
It is imperative that the University of California (UC) establish a Mosquito Control Specialist extension position to ensure that the public health of California residents and visitors is not compromised by exposure to mosquitoes and mosquito-borne diseases. For decades, UC, the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) and the Mosquito and Vector Control Association of California (MVCAC) have worked together to protect public health, with each group having distinct roles that were complementary and essential. Unfortunately, the role of UC has diminished dramatically over the last five years as funds were cut from the UC Mosquito Research Program (established by the California legislature in1970). Knowledge grounded in research is critical to effectively address the prevention, surveillance, and control of mosquito-borne diseases. Research provides the foundation for work subsequently done by CDPH and local vector control agencies. Without the third leg of the UC-CDPH-MVCAC stool, the foundation is unstable and ultimately, more Californians are at risk of becoming ill and dying from mosquito-borne diseases. In addition, environmental risks associated with pesticide use could increase and response to new vectors or diseases could be hindered. CDPH strongly supports the establishment of the Mosquito Control Specialist position.

Vicki Kramer, Ph.D., Chief
Vector-Borne Disease Section
California Department of Public Health
Posted Jul 6, 2012 2:18 PM by Vicki Kramer
7
The Sacramento-Yolo Mosquito and Vector Control district supports the creation of the Mosquito Control Specialist Position. The coordinated efforts of the California Department of Public Health, Mosquito and Vector Control Association of California, and the University of California has resulted in one of the most comprehensive public health vector control programs in the world. Research generated from the University has been applicable not only here in California, but throughout regions affected by vectors and vector control diseases. The proposed position would continue the maintenance and development of world-class programs and allow us to efficiently and effectively collaborate on combating local outbreaks of vectorborne diseases emerging world wide.

It is critical the proposed Mosquito Control Specialist position be funded. Please feel free to contact us if you have further need of information for this position.
Posted Jul 13, 2012 8:20 AM by David Brown
8
I am the Manager of the Colusa Mosquito Abatement District and feel that a mosquito control specialist is very important to the Colusa Program. I think this position should be funded
Posted Jul 13, 2012 11:33 AM by David Whitesell
9
The Contra Costa Mosquito and Vector Control district supports the creation of the Mosquito Control Specialist Position. For decades, all Californians have benefited from coordinated efforts of the California Department of Public Health, Mosquito and Vector Control Association of California, and the University of California. The result has been one of the most comprehensive public health vector control programs in the world. Research generated from the University has been applicable not only here in California, but throughout regions affected by vectors and vector control diseases. The proposed position would continue the maintenance and development of world-class programs and allow us to efficiently and effectively collaborate on combating local outbreaks of vectorborne diseases emerging world wide.

It is critical the proposed Mosquito Control Specialist position be funded.
Posted Jul 13, 2012 2:46 PM by Craig Downs
10
The Butte County Mosquito and Vector Control district supports the creation of the Mosquito Control Specialist Position. The coordinated efforts of the California Department of Public Health, Mosquito and Vector Control Association of California, and the University of California has resulted in one of the most comprehensive public health vector control programs in the world. Research generated from the University has been applicable not only here in California, but throughout regions affected by vectors and vector control diseases. The proposed position would continue the maintenance and development of world-class programs and allow mosquito and vector control agencies to efficiently and effectively collaborate on combating local outbreaks of vectors and vector-borne disease emerging worldwide.
It's crucial that the proposed Mosquito Control Specialist position be funded.

Matthew Ball
District Manager
Butte County Mosquito and Vector Control District
Posted Jul 16, 2012 12:01 PM by Matthew Ball
11
The San Gabriel Valley Mosquito and Vector Control District strongly supports creating the position of Mosquito Control Specialist. Continuous research concerning vectors and vectorborne disease is essential to protect public health in California, especially in light of increasing globalization. Historically agencies that manage vectors benefited greatly from a cooperative relationship with researchers from the University of California system. Discharging Drs Reisen and Walton from their duties as liaisons between the University of California and the state's vector control agencies completely severed a relationship that helped protect Californians from vectorborne diseases for over half a century. The proposed position would restore the exchange of information between the University of California, the California Department of Public Health, and vector control agencies, and allow us to efficiently and effectively combat local outbreaks of vectorborne diseases and provide information regarding emerging infectious diseases worldwide.

The Mosquito Control Specialist is critical to protecting the health and safety of Californians and should have never been abolished in the first place.

If the Department of ANR wishes to fulfill the University's mission statement of "providing long-term societal benefits through transmitting advanced knowledge, (and) discovering new knowledge..." it must fund the position.

Kenn K Fujioka, PhD
District Manager
San Gabriel Valley Mosquito and Vector Control District
Posted Jul 17, 2012 2:44 PM by Kenn Fujioka
12
The Coachella Valley Mosquito and Vector Control District strongly supports the creation of the Mosquito Control Specialist position. University of California research has been the backbone of our operations for decades. Currently our relationship is on a grant-by-grant basis, however we recognize the need for University position with a statewide viewpoint since vector-borne diseases are rarely contained within one district’s jurisdiction. The creation of a permanent position would provide the continuity necessary for comprehensive research program as well as a liaison between the University and state and local agencies.
Posted Jul 18, 2012 7:45 AM by Branka B. Lothrop, PhD, General Manager, Coachella Valley Mosquito and Vector Control District
13
The Tehama County Mosquito and Vector Control district supports the creation of the Mosquito Control Specialist Position. The coordinated efforts of the California Department of Public Health, Mosquito and Vector Control Association of California, and the University of California has resulted in one of the most comprehensive public health vector control programs in the world. The proposed position would continue the maintenance and development of world-class programs and allow us to efficiently and effectively collaborate on combating local outbreaks of vectorborne diseases emerging world wide.

I believe it is critical the proposed Mosquito Control Specialist position be funded. Please feel free to contact us if you have further need of information for this position
Posted Jul 18, 2012 9:22 AM by D. Andrew Cox
14
The importance of a connection between the University of California and the community of agencies charged with controlling mosquitoes cannot be overstated. Never has this been more true. The changes in mosquito control brought on by new and more stringent regulations are taking place at a rate not seen before and the ever shrinking involvement by the University will likely lead to choices and decisions being made in the absence of the foundation of research based knowledge.
Now is a time for improving cooperation between research and practical application, not eliminating it. The growing number of invasive species, including mosquitoes and the diseases they carry, will present future challenges to public health professionals at all levels. Please do not deprive us of the advantages afforded by an association with the research community at the University of California.
Creating a position of Mosquito Control Specialist would reconnect what has historically been one of the most comprehensive public health research programs in the Country with what is arguably one of the finest networks of mosquito and vector control agencies anywhere.
Michael Hearst, District Manager
Orange County Vector Control District
Posted Jul 18, 2012 11:28 AM by Michael Hearst
15
The contributions made by the University of California in mosquito and related vector-borne disease research have been instrumental in advancing the effectiveness of the California Department of Public Health and the Mosquito and Vector Control Association of California in the protection of public health. Due to the present lack of a liason position at the university, this relationship is clearly at risk. The creation of the position of Mosquito Control Specialist would reestablish that liason and thus preserve a very important partnership. With that in mind, the Solano County Mosquito Abatement District strongly supports this proposal.
Posted Jul 20, 2012 9:58 AM by Jon Blegen
16
On behalf of the Fresno Westside Mosquito Abatement District, I would like to express our strong support for the creation of the Mosquito Control Specialist position. There is a long history of mutual cooperation between the mosquito control agencies in California and the University of California. This relationship has seen an alarming decline over the past decade. It is now on the verge of being lost entirely. It is vital to maintain a cooperative network of agencies with the common goal of protecting the public health in California. This must include representation from the UC system. This position is not only necessary, it is long overdue.
Posted Jul 20, 2012 2:13 PM by Elizabeth Cline
17
Madera County Mosquito & Vector Control District strongly supports the hiring of a Mosquito Control Specialist Position. This position is vital to the cooperative effort between the MVCAA, Member District's and the University of California in protecting the public from vector borne diseases.
Posted Jul 20, 2012 2:45 PM by Leonard Irby
18
The Kern Mosquito and Vector Control District supports the creation of the Mosquito Control Specialist position. The Kern MVCD began mosquito contol operations in 1917. The District's original mission was to control mosquitoes and malaria along the Kern River and its sloughs. Mosquito-borne disease is a serious health concern in Kern County. Over the years, residents of Kern County have had to deal with St. Louis Encephalitis, Western Equine Encephalomyelitis and West Nile virus.
The residents of Kern County have greatly benefited from the research provided by University personnel. The establishment of the Mosquito Control Specialist position would help continue valuable research and also continue valuable collaboration between mosquito control agencies and research personnel from the University.
Posted Jul 23, 2012 9:16 AM by Rob Quiring
19
The Placer Mosquito and Vector Control District strongly supports the establishment of a Mosquito Control Specialist position. There have been strong historical ties between local mosquito and vector control districts for many decades in California which has resulted in a system that relies on coordinated and complimentary efforts of the University of California, the California Department of Public Health, and local districts.
In recent years, the ability for the University to participate in this cooperative effort has been degraded by loss of research funding and official access to the University through Dr. Bill Reisen and Dr. Bill Walton. While we understand that economic challenges were clearly a factor in these changes, it is vitally important that we do not lose a formal connection with the University.
Without University participation, the ability of mosquito and vector control programs throughout the state will not be unable to continue to keep ahead of new and emerging vector and vector-borne disease public health threats, nor will districts be able to rely on university research and expertise to support innovative and effective Integrated Vector Management programs. We have seen the importance of the University’s role in both of these areas as West Nile virus has become established in California.
The creation of a permanent Mosquito Control Specialist position would allow continued collaboration and timely exchange of information among mosquito and vector control districts, CDPH, and the University, which will allow Californians to continue to enjoy effective, safe, and scientifically-sound mosquito and vector control programs that can respond to current and future vector-borne disease threats.

Joel Buettner, M.S.
General Manager
Placer Mosquito and Vector Control District
Posted Jul 23, 2012 9:34 AM by Joel Buettner
20
The Placer Mosquito and Vector Control District strongly supports the establishment of a Mosquito Control Specialist position. There have been strong historical ties between local mosquito and vector control districts for many decades in California which has resulted in a system that relies on coordinated and complimentary efforts of the University of California, the California Department of Public Health, and local districts.
In recent years, the ability for the University to participate in this cooperative effort has been degraded by loss of research funding and official access to the University through Dr. Bill Reisen and Dr. Bill Walton. While we understand that economic challenges were clearly a factor in these changes, it is vitally important that we do not lose a formal connection with the University.
Without University participation, the ability of mosquito and vector control programs throughout the state will not be unable to continue to keep ahead of new and emerging vector and vector-borne disease public health threats, nor will districts be able to rely on university research and expertise to support innovative and effective Integrated Vector Management programs. We have seen the importance of the University’s role in both of these areas as West Nile virus has become established in California.
The creation of a permanent Mosquito Control Specialist position would allow continued collaboration and timely exchange of information among mosquito and vector control districts, CDPH, and the University, which will allow Californians to continue to enjoy effective, safe, and scientifically-sound mosquito and vector control programs that can respond to current and future vector-borne disease threats.

Joel Buettner, M.S.
General Manager
Placer Mosquito and Vector Control District
Posted Jul 23, 2012 10:22 AM by Joel Buettner
21
The County of El Dorado supports the creation of the new Mosquito Control Specialist position.

Karen Bender
Supervising Environmental Health Specialist
County of El Dorado
Posted Jul 23, 2012 10:39 AM by Karen Bender
22
I see it as an essential element of UC's teaching and research function that the close scientific link between the UC system, the MVCAC and its member districts and the CDPH be reinstated through the creation of a Mosquito Control Specialist position. UC must maintain a focused research leadership role in public health and entomology through engagement and close collaboration with our applied scientists and operational administrators, without which direction and purpose are lacking at a time when it is deperately required by the people of California. Climate change, pesticide restrictions and invasive vectors and pathogens create a critical immediate need for UC's innovative leadership and inter-agency dialogue engendered through the proposed position.

Thank you,
Paul Binding, Manager
Santa Cruz County Mosquito Abatement / Vector Control
Posted Jul 23, 2012 4:54 PM by Paul Binding
23
The Marin/Sonoma Mosquito and Vector Control District (MSMVCD) is in strong support of and urges the University of California to fund the Mosquito Control Specialist position. The vector and vector-borne disease related research conducted through the University has been crucial to protecting public health in California and the progression of vector control. MSMVCD understands the importance of continuous scientific research relative to vector-borne disease and vector control and provides substantial funding to the Mosquito and Vector Control Association of California's (MVCAC) Mosquito Research Foundation. The collaboration and exchange of information between the University of California, California Department of Public Health, and MVCAC have historically been and continue to be of the utmost importance. Dissolving Dr. Walton's and Dr. Reisen's positions as ANR liasons with MVCAC was extremely unfortunate. The creation of the Mosquito Control Specialist postion would be an essential, postive step toward reestablishing the important relationship and information exchange that greatly benefits mosquito and vector control, the environment, and public health in California and worldwide.

Erik Hawk
Assistant Manager
Marin/Sonoma Mosquito and Vector Control District
Posted Jul 26, 2012 8:40 AM by Erik Hawk
24
On behalf of the Merced County Mosquito Abatement District we enthusiastically support the proposed Mosquito Control Specialist Position. Historically, the UC Mosquito Research Program was recognized as one of the premier mosquito research programs worldwide. While many of these researchers still remain in the UC system, there is no current mechanism for disseminating and operationally implementing the research findings. Filling this position will re-establish the link between the mosquito abatement districts and the UC researchers.
Posted Jul 26, 2012 10:53 AM by Allan Inman
25
Californians have long benefited by the close association of the University of California, the California Department of Public Health (CDPH), and the mosquito and vector control districts of this state which together have developed the most sophisticated mosquito-borne disease surveillance and control program in the nation. As part of what has been referred to as a “three-legged stool,” we at CDPH are in constant communication with our UC colleagues as well as our constituents at local mosquito and vector control districts throughout the state to ensure timely surveillance and reporting of mosquito and tick-borne diseases. This information is used to target control measures in the most effective way to protect public health. California’s statewide mosquito surveillance and control program has been refined over time, thanks in good part to leadership of past-UC professors who were luminaries in the field of arbovirology (W. Reeves and B. Eldridge) and past UC ANR liaisons, Dr. Reisen and Dr. Walton, as well as the decades of basic and applied research projects funded in the past by the now defunct Mosquito Research Program,

I strongly support the proposed ANR position of mosquito control specialist. This position, with a focus on applied research, will go a long way to keeping California’s mosquito-borne disease surveillance and control program optimized thus protecting public health.


Kerry A. Padgett, Ph.D.
Infectious Disease Branch
California Department of Public Health
Posted Jul 26, 2012 12:14 PM by Kerry Padgett
26

The Lake County Vector Control District strongly supports the establishment of a Mosquito Control Specialist position.

The University of California, the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) and the Mosquito and Vector Control Association of California (MVCAC) have worked together closely, resulting in one of the most comprehensive public health vector control programs in the world. The research generated from the University has benefited California, as well as regions throughout the world that are affected by vectors and vector-borne diseases. This position would continue the maintenance and development of outstanding programs and allow us to efficiently and effectively collaborate on combating local outbreaks of vector-borne diseases emerging worldwide.

It is critical the proposed Mosquito Control Specialist position be funded.

Please feel free to contact me if you have further need of information for this position.

Jamesina J. Scott, Ph.D.
District Manager and Research Director
Lake County Vector Control District
Posted Jul 26, 2012 2:03 PM by Jamesina J. Scott
27
Effective vector-borne disease surveillance and mosquito control are essential to protect the public health of Californians. Increasingly, vector control professionals throughout the state are facing myriad economic, regulatory and environmental issues that challenge their ability to accomplish these tasks. Lagging budgets, increasing regulatory requirements, pesticide resistance, introduction of exotic vectors and pathogens, aging urban infrastructure and increasing wetland development are just some of the factors that vector control programs are facing today and into the foreseeable future. A strong collaborative effort between the Department of Public Health, University of California (UC) and local vector control agencies has never been more important to effectively manage these issues and provide the quality mosquito control and disease prevention services that Californians have come to expect and deserve. For these reasons I support the Mosquito Research Specialist Position at UC.

Mark G. Novak, Ph.D.
Supervising Public Health Biologist
California Department of Public Health
Center for Infectious Diseases
Posted Aug 2, 2012 10:02 AM by Mark Novak
28
California has one of the most comprehensive mosquito-borne disease surveillance and control programs in the world. The University of California, the Mosquito and Vector Control Association of California (consists of more than 60 mosquito and vector control agencies throughout the state), and the California Department of Public Health have been the foundation of this cooperative system. With the increased environmental concerns and regulatory issues and the continued reduction of mosquito control choices, the knowledge and experience of UC researchers in combating endemic and emerging mosquito-borne diseases such as West Nile virus are much needed. I strongly support the proposed Mosquito Control Specialist position at the University of California and certainly believe that the creation of the position will strengthen the stability of the “three-legged stool” and ensure the continuity of the efficient and effective mosquito-borne disease surveillance and control program in the state, thus protecting the public health.
Renjie Hu, Ph.D.
Supervising Public Health Biologist
California Department of Public Health
Division of Communicable Disease Control
Posted Aug 7, 2012 9:16 AM by Renjie Hu

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