Mustards

Note: The following cover crop images are part of an extensive collection of cover crop photographs maintained the UC SAREP staff. The images have not been completely categorized and labeled. Some will be included in a book on cover crops due out in 1997, but all images have been made available online because of the overwhelming number of requests we have had for them.

Image Description
Black mustard (Brassica nigra) has a taproot-dominated root system. Winters, CA. Photo by Robert L. Bugg.
Mustards and other brassicaceous cover crops have strong taproots. Winters, Yolo Co., CA. Photo by Bob Bugg
Black mustard (Brassica nigra) is a resident alien plant sometimes used as a cover crop. Winters, Yolo Co., CA, photo by Bob Bugg.
Phacelia and mustards are used as nitrogen catch crops in England, Europe, and the U.S.A.
Mustards and other brassicaceous cover crops have strong taproots. Winters, Yolo Co., CA. Photo by Bob Bugg
Black mustard (Brassica nigra) root.
Rapeseed or canola (Brassica napus) may be grown for oil or as a cover crop. Tifton, GA. Photo by Sharad C. Phatak.
Rapeseed or canola, Brassica napus, may be grown for seed or as a cover crop. Tifton, GA. Photo by Sharad C. Phatak.
Phacelia and various mustards may be used as nitrogen catch crops in rotation with vegetables. Great Britain. Photo by ???
Various mustards are used as cover crops in Californian orchards and vineyards. Carneros, CA. Photo by Robert L. Bugg.