KAC Citrus Entomology
University of California
KAC Citrus Entomology

Citrus Bugs Blog

Citrus Thrips Training for Pest Control Advisors and Scouts

Citrus Thrips Field Day at Lindcove

Tuesday May 1, 2018

9:30-11 am

Lindcove Research and Extension Center

22963 Carson Ave., Exeter, CA 93221

(559) 592-2408 ext 1151. 

 

Instructor: Dr. Beth Grafton-Cardwell

Course Objective: To teach PCAs how to recognize the various life stages of citrus thrips and the predatory mites that attack them.  Citrus thrips management strategies will be discussed.  Great training for new scouts!

9-9:30 a.m. Registration: Lindcove REC

9:30-11 a.m.

A. Powerpoint presentation by Beth Grafton-Cardwell on the biology of citrus thrips and its natural enemies, the efficacy of insecticides for citrus thrips control, treatment thresholds, the current status of resistance and resistance management tactics

B. Microscope identification of citrus thrips life stages compared to western flower thrips

C. Field demonstration of citrus thrips and predatory mite monitoring methods. 

 

Continuing Education 1.5 other units have been requested

Posted on Thursday, April 12, 2018 at 7:24 PM

Delegate Removed from the Bulk Citrus Spray and Move Treatment List

As of APRIL 20, 2018 Delegate (spinetoram) has been removed from the list of approved insecticides for the treatment of citrus  just prior to harvest for the purpose of disinfesting citrus prior to moving citrus-filled bins between quarantine zones in California.  The regulations for 'spray and move' can be found on the CDFA information for citrus growers/grove managers web page and the table from that document is shown below.   The reason for removing Delegate, is that it shows significantly less control of psyllids than the other treatments on the list.  It is critical to achieve high kill of psyllids to ensure fruit is disinfested, so that psyllids, and potentially HLB, are not moved around the state.  The alternative to 'spray and move' is field cleaning (brushing or washing fruit) and removing leaves and stems from the fruit and bins.  The eggs and nymphs attach themselves to leaves and stems and the adults can ride on fruit.  

In recognition of the issues related to treating citrus just prior to harvest, research is being conducted by the USDA and University of California to develop fogging and fumigant post harvest systems to disinfest fruit that will ultimately replace 'spray and move' treatments.

  

Posted on Tuesday, March 27, 2018 at 10:42 AM

California Red Scale Males are Active in the San Joaquin Valley

Temperatures are finally starting to increase after the cold spell we had in February and the first flight biofix of California red scale occurred roughly the middle of March in the San Joaquin Valley.  Degree days above the lower developmental threshold of 53oF are accumulating and have reached about 50 since March 16.  When the environment accumulates 550 degree days, the first crawler generation will appear.  See our California red scale degree day web site for more details.  Remember that every orchard is a little different due to orientation and elevation.  To obtain more precise information than our county averages, you should place temperature measuring instruments in your orchards.  To learn more about treating for California red scale, see the UC IPM Guidelines for Citrus.  

Trapping male scales on pheromone card
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Posted on Monday, March 26, 2018 at 1:56 PM

It’s time for DPR license and certificate holders renew—get units via online courses from UC IPM

November has arrived, and before you know it we'll be ringing in 2018! For those who hold a license or certificate from the Department of Pesticide Regulation (DPR), and have a last name starting with the letter M through Z, this is your year to renew.

DPR is urging license and certificate holders to mail in applications now to avoid late fees and to allow enough time for processing so that you can receive your new license or certificate by the beginning of the new year. Renewing early gives DPR time to notify you if you are short any continuing education (CE) hours and allows you time to complete any additional CE courses without having to retest.

If you need more hours to complete your renewal application and don't have time to attend an in-person meeting, then check out the online courses available from the UC Statewide IPM Program (UC IPM).

The following UC IPM and UC Agriculture and Natural Resources online courses have been approved by DPR and are available whenever and wherever you want to take them.

Laws and Regulations

  • Proper Pesticide Use to Avoid Illegal Residues (2 hours) $40.00 charge
  • Providing Integrated Pest Management Services in Schools and Child Care Settings (1 hour Laws and Regulations and 1 hour Other)

Other

  • Citrus IPM: California Red Scale (1 hour)
  • Citrus IPM: Citricola Scale (1 hour)
  • Citrus IPM: Citrus Peelminer (1 hour)
  • Citrus IPM: Citrus Red Mite (1 hour)
  • Citrus IPM: Cottony Cushion Scale (1 hour) 
  • Citrus IPM: Forktailed Bush Katydid (1 hour)
  • Pesticide Application Equipment and Calibration (1.5 hours)
  • Pesticide Resistance (2 hours)
  • Tuta absoluta: A Threat to California Tomatoes (1 hour)
  • Urban Pesticide Runoff and Mitigation: IPM – Pesticide Properties (1 hour) 
  • Urban Pesticide Runoff and Mitigation:  Impact of Pesticides - Urban Pesticide Runoff (1 hour)
  • Urban Pesticide Runoff and Mitigation: Water Quality and Mitigation:  Bifenthrin and Fipronil (1 hour)
  • Urban Pesticide Runoff and Mitigation: Herbicides and Water Quality (1 hour)

For those of you with last names A through L (or those of you who want to get a jump on your CE hours), look for new online courses from UC IPM coming in early 2018.

View the list of all DPR-approved online or in-person courses. For more information on the license and certification program and renewal information, visit the DPR website.

For more information about pest management and other training opportunities, see the UC IPM website.

Posted on Thursday, November 9, 2017 at 11:20 AM

Pollinator Week

Pollinator Week, June 19–25, 2017: Bee Knowledgeable!
—Stephanie Parreira, UC Statewide IPM Program

Bees are the most important pollinators of California agriculture—helping us grow field crops, fruits, nuts, and vegetables. Honey bees receive most of the credit for crop pollination, but many other kinds of bees play an important role as well. There are 1600 species of bees in California! Take time during Pollinator Week to learn about the different kinds of bees and what you can do to help them flourish.

Why should I care about other kinds of bees?

Bees other than honey bees contribute significantly to crop pollination. For example, alfalfa pollination by alfalfa leafcutter bees is worth $7 billion per year in the United States. Other bees can also boost the result of honey bee pollination—in almond orchards, honey bees are more effective when orchard mason bees are present. The more bee species, the merrier the harvest!

While growers often rent honey bee colonies to pollinate their crops, some wild bees pollinate certain crops even better than honey bees do. For instance, bumble bees are more effective pollinators of tomato because they do something honey bees do not: they shake pollen out of flowers with a technique known as buzz pollination. Likewise, native squash bees are better pollinators of cucurbits—unlike honey bees, they start work earlier in the day, and males even sleep in flowers overnight.

How can I help honey bees and other bees?

When it comes to land management and pest management practices, some bees need more accommodations than others. That's why it is important to know what bees are present in your area and important to your crop, and plan for their needs. Use this bee monitoring guide from the University of California to identify the bees present on your farm.

You can help all kinds of bees by using integrated pest management (IPM). This means using nonchemical pest management methods (cultural, mechanical and biological control), monitoring for pests to determine whether a pesticide is needed, and choosing pesticides that are less toxic to bees whenever possible. Check out the UC IPM Bee Precaution Pesticide Ratingsto learn about the risks different pesticides pose to honey bees and other bees, and follow the Best Management Practices To Protect Bees From Pesticides.

Bees also need plenty of food to stay healthy and abundant. Plant flowers that provide nectar and pollen throughout the year. See the planting resources below to find out which plants provide year-round food for specific types of bees.

Like honey bees, native bees need nesting areas to thrive. Bumble bees, squash bees, and other bees nest underground. Ground-nesting bees may require modified tilling practices (such as tilling fields no more than 6 inches deep for squash bees) or no-till management to survive. For aboveground nesters like carpenter bees and mason bees, consider planting hedgerows or placing tunnel-filled wooden blocks around the field. See the habitat resources below for more information about native bee nesting in agricultural areas.

Enjoy your “beesearch!”

Bee Habitat Resources

Sources

Posted on Friday, June 23, 2017 at 8:27 AM

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