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Comments:
by Scott
on March 23, 2014 at 10:02 AM
Great article, but I have a related question:  
We love the tadpoles that appear at the same time as the unwanted mosquito larva. Last year we tried the donuts to kill the mosquitos however they also killed the tadpoles. To your knowledge, what is the best way to kill the larva and keep the tadpoles?  
Thanks, Scott
by Andrew Mason Sutherland
on April 3, 2014 at 10:38 AM
Scott,  
The 'donuts' you reference were most likely 'mosquito dunks', containing an active ingredient derived from a naturally-occurring soil bacterium, Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis (Bti). The metabolites from these bacteria are toxic to insects once ingested; they should have no effect on vertebrates such as tadpoles. Perhaps something else happened to kill your tadpoles. Look carefully at the product label next time you try this to make sure Bti is the only active ingredient and that you apply the correct amount. You may also consider mosquitofish as predators, available from your county's Vector Control program. Best regards,  
Andrew Sutherland
by Ted
on September 15, 2014 at 5:20 PM
Hi...This is a very informative article...I would just like to ask about the breathing capabilities of the mosquito larvae..How many minutes can they breathe below the water surface before they suffocate?
by joan Keeley
on June 9, 2015 at 3:05 AM
In an entirely balanced pond there is not any have to be compelled to feed the fish as they’ll eat two-winged insect’s larvae, water fleas, worms, plants. Shield pond with EPDM Pond Liners and leave to be troubled concerning damages and issues of pond.
by abdul
on July 5, 2015 at 4:38 AM
Mosquito is a threat to us in Africa, especially during the raining season. It is a disturbing issue here Nigeria. I wish scientist can improve on how to kill mosquito rather than making weapon for killing fellow men. We need to destroy this insect.
by Dillie
on October 5, 2015 at 4:37 PM
i have a small bubble fountain about 18" deep with recirculating water. We don't let it run continually. We now have a lot of Mosquitos. What can we pour in the water to kill in larvae and the Mosquitos flying around it?
Reply by Pamela Kan-Rice
on October 5, 2015 at 4:49 PM
You can use Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) products such as Mosquito Dunks, Plunks, or Bits, which contain a bacterial agent that kills mosquito larvae but doesn’t affect people, other animals or plants. For more information about mosquitoes, visit http://www.ipm.ucdavis.edu/PMG/PESTNOTES/mosquitoes.html
by carlene
on October 27, 2015 at 7:59 PM
I hear just plain cooking oil keeps mosquito from leaving water. oil gets on the wings they can't fly and they die. but I wonder how this would affect fish,i'm thinking not good. but in a still pond i'll bet it will. anything to add,anybody?
by Cheri E
on May 14, 2016 at 6:18 AM
I have been raising mangroves in my home for a while now, and they are getting too big to keep inside on the counter so I wanted to put them outside. However, I was concerned about their bowl becoming a place for mosquitos to breed. What can I put in the water that will keep that from happening but still not harm the mangroves?
by tariq nawaz khattak
on May 14, 2016 at 9:36 AM
Let me share with you one of my finding, which surprised me a lot when one of our student applied along with other plant based extracts from controlling mosquitoes larvae.  
It is an organic compounds and not toxic for fish.It kills mosquito larvae within one hour with 0.125 ppm concentration.In fact its a great finding and I want to go commercial on it.  
Dr Tariq Pakistan.
by LORINNE
on May 17, 2016 at 12:06 PM
We a inherited a small artificial pond, about ten feet long, two feet wide and two feet deep. Two years ago we placed ordinary "feeder fish" goldfish at 22 cents each, about an inch long. We have no fountain, no nothing, the fish are now over 6 inches long, had babies last year, and no more mosquitoes! We do feed them from april to october (we live on the west coast of Canada). Just be very sure there is no chance your pond could flood releasing fish into the natural waterways - this is would be extremely detrimental to the ecology of local waterways.
by Sophie
on May 19, 2016 at 7:46 AM
Virginia Beach has started its summertime effort to combat mosquito populations throughout the city and this year they are also keeping a close eye on the Zika virus. To avoid mosquito bites, get mosquito nets
by Ali
on May 31, 2016 at 4:25 PM
The old way to remove mosquitoes is to spray or pour a small amount of kerosene into the water. Obviously not where there is fish. This stops the larvae from breathing and the all die within hours. The kero seems to break down quite quickly and disappear. Cooking oil does not disperse over the water in the same way. You will see multicoloured reflections all over the treated areas.
by Jacqueline
on June 7, 2016 at 12:43 PM
Can Mosquito dunks etc. be run through a pump as in a water feature? Any other suggestions? I have birds that often come to bathe and splash in the waterfall and don't want to harm them in any way. Thanks
by SUS AN
on July 6, 2016 at 10:10 AM
I have saved rain in several large buckets. Will use in the next couple of weeks. Do I need to add something to prevent mosquito larva ?
by Don mitchel
on August 29, 2016 at 10:16 AM
A thesis written by Elizabeth Kathleen McCraven (University of New Orleans) Electro-Disinfection of Ballast Water, can be found on the web, it states that it is known that mosquito larvae is in ballast water. Her statements on mosquitos and ballast water are written in plain talk that speaks volumes about the way the ballast water is being looked for disease transmissions. Mosquitos feed on algae. New unexplained algae is showing up throughout the Great Lakes. Recent studies have shown large amounts of bacteria ,virus's and algae coming into the Great Lakes after an ocean flush.  
Without federal ballast water protection for ships exclusively using all the different Great Lakes, each with their distinctively different echo systems and problems. What new disease's such as Zika will the mosquitos species in the Great Lakes prove to carry? Florida is rampant with algae mosquitos feed on algae.
by Joyce Sue
on August 30, 2016 at 9:02 PM
I have a small fountain with recirulating water. I always thought that if there is movement in the water then mosquito's  
could not survive..well, just found black mosquito larvae along with little red worms in there. I am hesitant to use the "dunk" because my next door neighbor has bee hives and I do not want to harm the bees. The dunk claims it is safe for animals, fish and birds but nothing about bees. I have yet to year from the company. Please advise if dunks are bee safe. Thank you.
by Biswajit rana
on September 1, 2016 at 1:01 AM
i want infortation about the mosquito larva
by Andrew Mason Sutherland
on September 7, 2016 at 10:52 AM
To address comments and concerns above about Bti products ('mosquito dunks'). This microbial insecticide is selective: it only affects fly larvae. It is especially active against mosquitoes, fungus gnats, midges, and other primitive flies. It should not affect adult bees adversely. Once dissolved / suspended in the water, it will circulate freely in pumped systems. Mosquito management should be practiced any time water will be standing for more than five to seven days. Make sure to read product labels to ensure pesticide use is allowed in your state and at your 'site'.
by Lola robuck josey
on September 11, 2016 at 8:10 AM
I read that coffee grounds were effective in destroying mosquito larvae. True?
by Andrew Mason Sutherland
on September 13, 2016 at 10:25 AM
To Lola robuck josey,  
 
I have never heard of using coffee grounds to 'destroy' mosquito larvae. I believe the main effects of such an application would be to acidify and reduce clarity of the water. This sounds like a terrible idea.
by Philip
on November 26, 2016 at 3:37 PM
Adding to what Lorrine has already said. A few small fish are the answer and goldfish will add interest and colour
 
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