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Green news from the UC Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources
Hills
Comments:
by Garden Goddesses
on April 4, 2014 at 9:14 AM
Great tips, thank you!
by Joe Boldt
on April 5, 2014 at 9:59 AM
A diagram of "Plant seeds and transplants in a hexagonal "off-set" pattern rather than in straight rows." would be useful.  
 
Thanks,  
Joe Boldt  
Master Gardener, San Diego
by Anne Osborn
on April 7, 2014 at 7:54 AM
Thank you for the recommendation about hexagonal planting, I do this successfully for strawberries, it opens opporutnities for other plants.
by Patricia W Silva
on April 19, 2014 at 8:56 AM
I'm interested in why Roma tomatoes are included in this list. Why do they need less water than others? Because they are meatier and hold less water is my guess. Am I way off base?  
 
Patricia Silva
by Melissa G. Womack
on April 21, 2014 at 9:37 AM
HI Patricia,  
There are a couple of reasons why Roma tomatoes are on the list. Roma tomatoes are a type of paste tomato - meaning they have a denser fruit wall and less water. This is what makes them great for sauces, ketchup and canning. Roma tomatoes are determinate meaning that the plant grows to its full size and then stops. Indeterminate tomato varieties often have more vegetative growth than determinate ones and therefore typically need more water. The other tenant of a determinate tomato plant is that the fruit crop ripens together instead of the fruit ripening over the course of the season. Once you’ve harvested your Roma crop, you can pull out the plant and compost it – there is no further need to water it.  
Thanks, Melissa
by Emma
on November 4, 2014 at 2:21 AM
Thank you so much for this article! I live in a place with very hot climate and I don't know how to plant vegetables. Thanks again! Regards!  
Emma
by Jenn
on January 23, 2015 at 12:54 PM
I think your last tip is arguably the most important. When I first wanted to start a vegetable garden, I set aside a huge plot of yard for it. I had all these visions of a beautiful and efficient garden that would yield more vegetables than anyone else's. It didn't take long before I realized what I really had on my hands-- an overwhelming mess. Now I plant only as much as I know I'll be able to handle. I might not get as many vegetables, but I can keep up this way.
by Jenn
on January 23, 2015 at 12:55 PM
I think your last tip is arguably the most important. When I first wanted to start a vegetable garden, I set aside a huge plot of yard for it. I had all these visions of a beautiful and efficient garden that would yield more vegetables than anyone else's. It didn't take long before I realized what I really had on my hands-- an overwhelming mess. Now I plant only as much as I know I'll be able to handle. I might not get as many vegetables, but I can keep up this way.
by Kevin
on May 27, 2015 at 6:03 AM
Those are excellent tips on reducing the usage of water for gardening. Thanks a lot for the share.  
 
Impressive write-up, indeed!  
 
- Artificial Grass GB
by Lauren
on June 23, 2015 at 11:07 AM
Great tips! You are absolutely right about using drip irrigation over a sprinkler system. So much more efficient. A product I use that is simple to use is a drip irrigation hose. It's similar to a soaker hose but is more efficient and waters more evenly.
by Elyse Chase
on July 17, 2015 at 6:50 AM
Drip irrigation has always been the better choice! Thank you for the informative article, I'm going to share it to my colleagues. It's important for us as professionals to be aware about the ways to reduce water usage during a drought.
by Emily
on September 15, 2015 at 7:26 AM
I'm surprised there's no mention of rain barrels.. We have a dozen 55 gallon barrels (some connected forming larger reservoirs) collecting runoff water around our property\, and we use drought-resistant crops. Since the crops don't need that much water, the barrels can last weeks, sometimes. Entirely sufficient for the dry spells we get here. For an additional bit of water and water-saving, we run the overflow from the largest set of barrels (they fill much faster than the others) into a large kiddie pool, then we can use that water for a foot soak on hot days or for watering, depending on needs.  
 
This past summer, we did not use a single drop of city water for any of our 4x12 raised beds, nor the 4 wildflower beds/2-dozen potted veggies (to bring indoors, fully mature and producing, over winter) or any of our indoor plants.
by Jhoell
on July 7, 2016 at 2:36 AM
Wow! This is something that I need to do and probably a lot of others. I have been looking at different ideas on pinterest.
by Clive
on January 18, 2017 at 2:35 AM
I didn't know that about the best watering times, very interesting. Thanks for sharing!  
 
Clive  
DIY Garden UK
by Bob Archer
on September 3, 2017 at 11:37 PM
Read above info. Found it very thoughtful and informative
 
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