Center for Forestry at UC Berkeley
Center for Forestry at UC Berkeley
Center for Forestry at UC Berkeley
University of California
Center for Forestry at UC Berkeley

Center for Forestry at UC Berkeley

About the Center

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The Center for Forestry brings together researchers to create and disseminate knowledge concerning ecosystem processes, human interactions and value systems, and restoration and operational forestry management practice.

The Center for Forestry is located in the College of Natural Resources on the University of California, Berkeley Campus. It also serves as part of the system-wide Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources.

The center is co-directed by Bill Stewart, forestry extension specialist, and Scott Stephens, professor of fire sciences.  For  additional information or inquiries, please contact Carlin Starrs, policy analyst.

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Forest Research and Outreach

The effects of density and high severity fire on tree and forest health
Posted 11/18/2014 - Reposted from the UCANR Green Blog. Hike off-trail through most any part of the Sierra Nevada and you may find yourself losing your hat to a low hanging branch, your shoe to a thicket of dead and dying brush, or your companion to the crevice hidden by...

News

11/18 - Announcement: Available Positions at UC Berkeley

11/18 - Announcement: Available Positions at UC Berkeley

The Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management at the University of California, Berkeley seeks academics to apply as an Assistant Cooperative Extension Specialist (Fiscal Year) to conduct applied research and outreach in each of the following areas: Forest Health; Rangeland Planning & Policy; and Water Resources & Climate Change Adaptation. The expected start date is July 1, 2015.

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11/6 - Sprouting from the Ashes - Robin Bellows, ESPM Graduate Student, Masters of Forestry

11/6 - Sprouting from the Ashes - Robin Bellows, ESPM Graduate Student, Masters of Forestry

"Last summer, working at Blodgett was an opportunity to get my boots in the mud and put classroom concepts to practice, from timber management to resilience ecology. In class, I studied how stands of trees change over time; at Blodgett, I thinned young trees to manipulate the growth progression of the forest. I read about fire ecology in class, and at Blodgett I measured sapling survival after a burn. After hefting a pack full of frothy purple herbicide up a hill, I learned to respect its power in beating back thorns that would have taken hours of scratches to uproot by hand. I felled a tree and thought, “what responsibility do I have to reshape this landscape?”

Sprouting from the Ashes - Robin Bellows, ESPM Graduate Student, Masters of Forestry

 

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The Forest Steward Blog

How to train your giant sequoia
Posted 4/5/2013 -   Article reviewed: Density effects on giant sequoia (Sequoiadendron giganteum) growth through 22 years: Implications for restoration and plantation management By R. York, K O’Hara, and J. Battles, published in Western Journal of...

The beautiful fall colors of the conifer forest: small orange flames and big yellow machines
Posted 1/18/2013 - Article reviewed: Fuel treatment longevity in a Sierra Nevada mixed conifer forest By S. Stephens, B. Collins, and G. Roller. Published in the journal Forest Ecology and Management, 285: 204-212 The plot line: This study looks at how long fire...

Webmaster Email: billstewart@berkeley.edu