Center for Forestry at UC Berkeley
University of California
Center for Forestry at UC Berkeley

Center for Forestry News

1/3 - Grouse Ridge Forest Easement for Bear Yuba Land Trust PG&E Land Donated to University of California

As part of its land conservation commitment, Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) recently donated 1,459 acres to the University of California (UC). The transfer was immediately followed by the conveyance of a conservation easement to Bear Yuba Land Trust (BYLT), permanently protecting high-country forest land and important wildlife habitat.

Read More at YubaNet

Posted on Tuesday, January 3, 2017 at 11:24 AM

12/7 - Drones help monitor health of giant sequoias

"Todd Dawson's field equipment always includes ropes and ascenders, which he and his team use to climb hundreds of feet into the canopies of the world's largest trees, California's redwoods." Now with the help of drones, there is no need for this laborious work of climbing up the redwood trees. 

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Posted on Wednesday, December 14, 2016 at 1:23 PM

More Than 100 Million Dead Trees in California

"The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) announced today that the U.S. Forest Service has identified an additional 36 million dead trees across California since its last aerial survey in May 2016. This brings the total number of dead trees since 2010 to over 102 million on 7.7 million acres of California's drought stricken forests. In 2016 alone, 62 million trees have died, representing more than a 100 percent increase in dead trees across the state from 2015. Millions of additional trees are weakened and expected to die in the coming months and years."

(US Forest Service) Dead Trees on a parched landscape

 

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Posted on Wednesday, November 30, 2016 at 1:39 PM

U.S. federal fire and forest policy: emphasizing resilience in dry forests

Current U.S. forest fire policy emphasizes short-term outcomes versus long-term goals. This perspective drives managers to focus on the protection of high-valued resources, whether ecosystem-based or developed infrastructure, at the expense of forest resilience. Given these current and future challenges posed by wildland fire and because the U.S. Forest Service spent >50% of its budget on fire suppression in 2015, a review and reexamination of existing policy is warranted. One of the most difficult challenges to revising forest fire policy is that agency organizations and decision making processes are not structured in ways to ensure that fire management is thoroughly considered in management decisions...

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Posted on Wednesday, November 16, 2016 at 11:57 AM

10/24 - Wildfire Management

"An unprecedented 40-year experiment in a 40,000-acre valley of Yosemite National Park strongly supports the idea that managing fire, rather than suppressing it, makes wilderness areas more resilient to fire, with the added benefit of increased water availability and resistance to drought. 

After a three-year, on-the-ground assessment of the park's Illilouette Creek basin, UC Berkeley researchers concluded that a strategy dating to 1973 of managing wildfires with minimal suppression and almost no preemptive, so-called prescribed burns has created a landscape more resistant to catastrophic fire, with more diverse vegetation and forest structure and increased water storage, mostly in the form of meadows in areas cleared by fires."

Wildfire management vs. fire suppression benefits forest and watershed

Posted on Monday, October 24, 2016 at 1:54 PM

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