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UC ANR researchers and staff engage farmers, other stakeholders at World Ag Expo 2018

World Ag Expo visitors discuss conservation tillage at Jeff Mitchell's exhibit at the UC ANR tent.

UC ANR had a major presence at World Ag Expo Feb. 13-15 in Tulare. In addition to exhibits inside the Pavilion, this year, UC ANR hosted a series of well-attended researcher demonstrations of citrus varieties, soil quality and other subjects in a tent outside. UC ANR scientists also gave presentations on “hot topics” ranging from the use of drones and other electronic technology in production agriculture to animal health to human nutrition.

UCCE advisors Surendra Dara, left, and Brenna Aergerter were among the scientists available to answer grower questions.

“Between our tent and our Pavilion space, there's been a lot of very good engagement and discussions with the primary stakeholder audience,” said Mike Janes, Strategic Communications director.

Jeff Dahlberg, Kearney Ag Research and Extension Center director, discussed his research on sorghum. The drought-tolerant crop can be used in food, feed and bioenergy products.

On the opening day of the expo, USDA Secretary Sonny Perdue held a town hall to hear from members of California's agriculture industry concerns about the upcoming Farm Bill. VP Glenda Humiston was among those present for the discussion, which attracted considerable media attention.

USDA Secretary Sonny Perdue was interviewed by California Farm Bureau President Jamie Johansson at World Ag Expo.

Western Farm Press wrote: “While trade, labor and regulatory issues may top the list of agricultural policy issues Perdue faces in Washington D.C., Glenda Humiston, Vice President of the University of California Agriculture and Natural Resources Division of the state's Land Grant university, stressed the importance of adequate research funding and federal definitions of rural versus urban, which she said is having detrimental impacts across California on important program funding.”

“If a county has one town that has 50,000 population in it, the entire county is labeled metropolitan for purposes of allocating funding,” Humiston said in the Hanford Sentinel

Rob Johnson, left, looks on as Sean Hogan, IGIS academic coordinator, describes the use of drones in agricultural research.

“Humiston said that while UCANR has a ‘proud tradition of research in California,' the university is plagued by reduced budgets at the same time the state is plagued by a new invasive pest every several weeks. She said for the university to stay ahead of these issues and to help growers in these and many other areas, additional funding is vital,” Farm Press reporter Todd Fitchette wrote.

In private communication, Fitchette said that widespread applause broke out from the audience in response to Humiston's comments.

 

Posted on Monday, February 26, 2018 at 10:47 AM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture

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