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Public to weigh in on Sierra Nevada forest recommendations May 27

Pacific fisher
To protect forests and homes from wildfire, vegetation is often removed to reduce fuel for a fire. But how do those forest management treatments affect fire risk, wildlife, forest health and water?

Since 2006, a team of University of California Agriculture and Natural Resources scientists has been studying the effects of vegetation management in the Sierra Nevada forest on fire behavior, forest health, water quality and quantity, the Pacific fisher (a small mammal in the weasel family) and the California spotted owl. The researchers are writing up their final reports and seeking public feedback on their recommendations and next steps in the process.

On Wednesday, May 27, community members are invited to discuss the recommendations with the Sierra Nevada Adaptive Management Project (SNAMP) team at an all-day meeting in the Sacramento area.   

“Although adaptive management as a theory of practice in resource management has been in the literature for decades, few studies have been done to truly apply theory to actual practice,” said Susie Kocher, a UC ANR Cooperative Extension forestry and natural resources advisor for the Central Sierra area.

Spotted owls
“SNAMP was designed in an open and transparent process, engaging the public, agencies and land managers with the scientists,” said Kocher, who has encouraged public participation in the process.

The US Forest Service's 2004 Sierra Nevada Forest Plan Amendment calls for managing the 11 national forests in the Sierra Nevada using the best information available to protect forests and homes. SNAMP is designed to provide resource managers with research-based information for making forest management decisions.

The SNAMP meeting will be held 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on May 27 at the Wildland Fire Training Center, 3237 Peacekeeper Way in McClellan (near McClellan Airfield outside Sacramento).

To attend, please register at http://ucanr.edu/snamp2015annualmeeting by Sunday, May 24. Registration is free.  

For more information about the project, visit http://snamp.cnr.berkeley.edu. The final SNAMP report will be available for download at http://snamp.cnr.berkeley.edu/snamp-final-report. Comments will be accepted online at http://ucanr.edu/snampreportcomments until July 15.

SNAMP participants view a treatment site in 2011
Posted on Friday, May 22, 2015 at 6:16 PM

What's That Bug?

The championship Linnaean Team, Pacific Branch of the Entomological Society of America: (from left) Jéssica Gillung, Brendon Boudinot, and Ralph Washington Jr. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It's exciting, entertaining and educational to watch the Entomological...

The championship Linnaean Team, Pacific Branch of the Entomological Society of America: (from left) Jéssica Gillung, Brendon Boudinot, and Ralph Washington Jr. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The championship Linnaean Team, Pacific Branch of the Entomological Society of America: (from left) Jéssica Gillung, Brendon Boudinot, and Ralph Washington Jr. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The championship Linnaean Team, Pacific Branch of the Entomological Society of America: (from left) Jéssica Gillung, Brendon Boudinot, and Ralph Washington Jr. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Linnaean Games question asked of the UC Davis team: What caste of honey bee has the greatest number of ommatidia? The answer is the drone, the male honey bee. Ommatidia are the subunits of a compound eye. This photo shows a worker bee or female (left) and a drone (right). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A Linnaean Games question asked of the UC Davis team: What caste of honey bee has the greatest number of ommatidia? The answer is the drone, the male honey bee. Ommatidia are the subunits of a compound eye. This photo shows a worker bee or female (left) and a drone (right). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Linnaean Games question asked of the UC Davis team: What caste of honey bee has the greatest number of ommatidia? The answer is the drone, the male honey bee. Ommatidia are the subunits of a compound eye. This photo shows a worker bee or female (left) and a drone (right). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, May 22, 2015 at 3:49 PM

'The Astonishing Ant Man' Jack Longino to Speak at UC Davis

A side view of the new ant species Eurhopalothrix zipacna that Jack Longino discovered in Central America. (Photo by Jack Longino)

John "Jack" Longino knows his ants. "We share the planet with...

A side view of the new ant species Eurhopalothrix zipacna that Jack Longino discovered in Central America. (Photo by Jack Longino)
A side view of the new ant species Eurhopalothrix zipacna that Jack Longino discovered in Central America. (Photo by Jack Longino)

A side view of the new ant species Eurhopalothrix zipacna that Jack Longino discovered in Central America. (Photo by Jack Longino)

Posted on Thursday, May 21, 2015 at 2:28 PM

Wasp Love!

A European paper wasp, Polistes dominula, foraging for food. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

"Wasp love." You don't hear those two words often, but you'll hear them...

A European paper wasp, Polistes dominula, foraging for food. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A European paper wasp, Polistes dominula, foraging for food. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A European paper wasp, Polistes dominula, foraging for food. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-up of a European paper wasp. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Close-up of a European paper wasp. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-up of a European paper wasp. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Amy Toth with a favorite wasp. (Photo courtesy of Iowa State University)
Amy Toth with a favorite wasp. (Photo courtesy of Iowa State University)

Amy Toth with a favorite wasp. (Photo courtesy of Iowa State University)

Posted on Wednesday, May 20, 2015 at 4:35 PM

The Wonderful World of Bugs

UC Davis entomology graduate student  Jéssica Gillung engages Griffin Shepherd, 7, of Winters, as she talks about a rose-haired tarantula. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Forget about “fun and games.” Think  “fun and...

UC Davis entomology graduate student  Jéssica Gillung engages Griffin Shepherd, 7, of Winters, as she talks about a rose-haired tarantula. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
UC Davis entomology graduate student Jéssica Gillung engages Griffin Shepherd, 7, of Winters, as she talks about a rose-haired tarantula. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis entomology graduate student Jéssica Gillung engages Griffin Shepherd, 7, of Winters, as she talks about a rose-haired tarantula. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Martin Hauser, senior insect biosystematist, California Department of Food and Agriculture, introduces Lucy Anderson, 9 of Davis to a walking stick. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Martin Hauser, senior insect biosystematist, California Department of Food and Agriculture, introduces Lucy Anderson, 9 of Davis to a walking stick. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Martin Hauser, senior insect biosystematist, California Department of Food and Agriculture, introduces Lucy Anderson, 9 of Davis to a walking stick. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Natasha Pineiro and Lucy and Liam Anderson, all of Davis, check out a display. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Natasha Pineiro and Lucy and Liam Anderson, all of Davis, check out a display. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Natasha Pineiro and Lucy and Liam Anderson, all of Davis, check out a display. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Griffin Shepherd, 7, and his sister, Savannah, 10, of Winters examine some of the specimen drawers. In the background is entomologist and Bohart Museum associate Jeff Smith talking to Alanna Vorous of Sacramento. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Griffin Shepherd, 7, and his sister, Savannah, 10, of Winters examine some of the specimen drawers. In the background is entomologist and Bohart Museum associate Jeff Smith talking to Alanna Vorous of Sacramento. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Griffin Shepherd, 7, and his sister, Savannah, 10, of Winters examine some of the specimen drawers. In the background is entomologist and Bohart Museum associate Jeff Smith talking to Alanna Vorous of Sacramento. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, May 19, 2015 at 4:52 PM

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