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UCCE Master Gardeners of Tuolumne County
University of California
UCCE Master Gardeners of Tuolumne County

UCCE Master Gardeners of Tuolumne County

Gardening Tips for June

  • Thin apples when ½” diameter.
  • Mow general cleanup for fire protection..
  • Mulch garden beds to retain moisture and encourage deep roots by deep and infrequent watering.
  • Check sprinklers and drip systems for needed repairs and adjustments.
  • Water early in the day to conserve water and minimize plant disease.
  • Pinch back tips of chrysanthemums, fuchsias, marguerites.
  • Tie up vines and stake tall growing dahlias, gladiolas, and lilies.
  • For continued bloom, cut off spent flowers.
  • Hang strips of foil or CD’s in fruit trees to help deter birds.
  • First summer pruning for stone fruit.
  • Thin grapes.
  • Dig and divide crowded bulbs if the tops have died down.
  • Give your indoor plants a bath.
  • Place a 1” board under pots sitting on pavement to insulate them from radiated heat.
  • Thoroughly clean debris from ponds, fountains and bird baths.
  • Check dates of Master Gardener classes.

Get more of this month's tips...


Have a Gardening Question?

Contact the Master Gardener Hotline: 209-533-5912 or fill out the "Ask a Master Gardener" online form.

More Information:

Become a fan of UCCE Tuolumne County Master Gardeners' Facebook page by clicking here.

Have a turf lawn in the summer-dry foothills?  Go to http://www.ipm.ucdavis.edu/TOOLS/TURF/ to learn how to test your sprinkler output.

Calendar of Events

Event Name
Date
7/8/2017

Blog

Hey, Honey Bee, I'll Race You to the Flowers!
Posted 6/21/2017 - Hey, honey bee, I'll race you to the flowers. Okay, but you'll lose. I can go faster. Watch me! The scene: a male bumble bee, Bombus melanopygus, and a worker honey bee, Apis mellifera, are buzzing along at breakneck speed toward the lavender in our pollinator garden in Vacaville, Calif. They nearly collide but Mr. Bumble Bee pauses in mid-air and gives Ms. Honey Bee a free pass---and just in time for National Pollinator Week, when all of our pollinators need free passes! That starts out...

Tower of Beauty: Tower of Bees
Posted 6/20/2017 - The Echium wildpretii is commonly known as "The Tower of Jewels" but it ought to be known as "The Tower of Beauty." That's especially when honey bees gather to collect the blue pollen and sip the sweet nectar. Or when their wings glisten in the early morning sun. Or when it's National Pollinator Week. In our family, we call it "The Christmas Tree" due to two reasons: its height (it's as tall as a Christmas tree) and due to its spiked red blossoms, the color of Christmas. The plant, in the...

It's National Pollinator Week! See Any Butterflies?
Posted 6/19/2017 - It's National Pollinator Week! Do you know where your pollinators are? Or better yet, do you know how to attract them and protect them? Pollinator Partnership has announced that June 19-25 has been designated National Pollinator Week by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the U.S. Department of the Interior. Talk about alliteration: pollinators can be bees, birds, butterflies, bats and beetles. (And many other species, including flies.) We stepped into our pollinator garden this morning...

Worth Their Weight in Gold, Silver and Bronze...
Posted 6/15/2017 - When a story is worth its weight in gold, and a photo is worth its weight in silver and bronze...according to the judges... Two communicators based at the University of California, Davis, and affiliated with the UC Agriculture and Natural Resources, won a total of five awards for their writing and photography in a competition sponsored by the international Association for Communication Excellence in Agriculture, Natural Resources, and Life and Human Sciences (ACE). The awards were presented at...

Got Milkweed? Bees Like It, Too!
Posted 6/15/2017 - The Bohart Museum of Entomology at the University of California, Davis, stocks a "Got Milkweed?" t-shirt in its gift shop. In real life, insects "get" milkweed. We all know it's the only host plant of the monarch butterfly--where monarchs lay their eggs--but it's also a a great source of nectar for butterflies and other insects. Take the showy milkweed, Asclepias speciosa. Native to California, it is found throughout North America, including in our little pollinator garden! Speciosa nectar...

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