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Happenings in the insect world
Comments:
by Steve Ryan
on April 26, 2019 at 4:24 PM
Hi, Doc! I have a pre-problem situation that shows signs of burgeoning. My Lascinato Kale is being chewed at (small pinholes inside the leaf, no damage on the plant edge), and I would ask your guidance on how to control the pest(s) you identify. I have pictures, but I don't see a way to attach them.  
Thanks so much!  
Sincerely,  
Steve Ryan
by Steve Ryan
on April 26, 2019 at 5:13 PM
Hi Doc! I have a pre-problem situation that shows signs of burgeoning. My Lascinato Kale is being chewed at (small pinholes inside the leaf, no damage on the plant edge), and I would ask your guidance on how to control the pest(s) you identify. I have pictures, but I don't see a way to attach them.  
Thanks so much!  
Sincerely,  
Steve Ryan
Reply by Kathy Keatley Garvey
on May 1, 2019 at 9:25 AM
"Bug Doctor" Ralph Washington Jr. answers this: "I think that there are two good possibilities: early instar imported cabbageworm (Pieris rapae) or adult crucifer flea beetle (Phyllotreta cruciferae). The latter would quickly start chewing larger holes and start chewing the leaf edge; I think the former consistently feed on the interior surface of the leaves, and make smaller holes. I’m leaning towards Ph. cruciferae. We’d be able to tell for sure with photos, of course. If you catch P. rapae early enough, you can often control them with B.t. kurstaki. You can control the flea beetles with garden-store-available pyrethrins."
by Des FitzGerald
on April 29, 2019 at 11:18 AM
I wonder if anyone knows of insect population studies that might be happening in the mountain west here in the U.S. I'm particularly interested in anyone who is measuring a possible decline in insect populations and their impact on the fly fishing community in the northeast and mountain states.  
DF
by RICHARD MURPHY
on May 3, 2019 at 4:51 PM
I have bugs bugging (biting) me. Local pest control says it's Swallow Bugs (Oeciacus vicarius), hungry for a blood meal until their favorite hosts return to our roof eaves this spring. Can I send a specimen to be positively ID'ed to be sure it's not just a common bed bug?
 
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