Subtropical Fruit Crops Research & Education
University of California
Subtropical Fruit Crops Research & Education

Posts Tagged: citrus

Citrus? Water? How Do They Go Together?

Advances in Citrus Water Use

                         Workshop & Field Day

Tuesday, March 26, 2019

8 Am - 3 PM

Strathmore, CA

 

Attend the Advances in Citrus Water Use Workshop & Field Day and join UC Davis Irrigation Specialist Daniele Zaccaria as well as other water experts and specialists from the University of California Cooperative Extension, the California Department of Water Resources, and the Citrus Research Board to learn about research advances in water use and irrigation for citrus production. Gain firsthand practical knowledge of the latest developments in the citrus industry and become familiar with methods and tools to measure evapotranspiration (ET) and crop coefficients (Kc), tree water status, and monitor soil moisture to inform irrigation planning and scheduling decisions for citrus. 

 

What to expect?

Session topics include:

  • Current research
  • Water management and regulation
  • Optional Field Session on irrigation technology

View a tentative agenda here.

 

 

Registration Details

 

$35 registration fee includes admission to the field day, coffee, refreshments, and lunch.

 

 

 

Register online, here. Fee will increase on March 13.

 

 

Limited to the first 150 participants

 

 

Logistics and Registration

ANR Program Support, Julia Kalika, (530) 750-1380 or Shannon Martin, (530) 750-1328

citrus cornucopia
citrus cornucopia

Posted on Friday, March 8, 2019 at 1:44 PM
Tags: citrus (304), irrigation (75), water (47)

Water is Life and Watering Citrus is Critical - Come Learn

Advances in Citrus Water Use

               Workshop & Field Day

Tuesday, March 26, 2019

8:00 AM-3:00 PM

Strathmore, California

Register NOW!!!

 https://ucanr.edu/sites/citrusfieldday/Registration/

About the Field Day

 

Attend the Advances in Citrus Water Use Workshop & Field Day and join UC Davis Irrigation Specialist Daniele Zaccaria as well as other water experts and specialists from the University of California Cooperative Extension, the California Department of Water Resources, and the Citrus Research Board to learn about research advances in water use and irrigation for citrus production. Gain firsthand practical knowledge of the latest developments in the citrus industry and become familiar with methods and tools to measure evapotranspiration (ET) and crop coefficients (Kc), tree water status, and monitor soil moisture to inform irrigation planning and scheduling decisions for citrus. 

 

What to expect?

Session topics include:

  • Current research
  • Water management and regulation
  • Optional Field Session on irrigation technology

View a tentative agenda here.

Registration Details

$35 registration fee includes admission to the field day, coffee, refreshments, and lunch.

 

Register online, here. Fee will increase on March 13.

 

Limited to the first 150 participants.

Contacts for More Information

 

Logistics and Registration

ANR Program Support, Julia Kalika, (530) 750-1380 or Shannon Martin, (530) 750-1328.

 

Course Content 

Daniele Zaccaria, UC Cooperative Extension Specialist, Agricultural Water Management

 

citrus cornucopia
citrus cornucopia

Posted on Friday, March 8, 2019 at 1:26 PM
Tags: citrus (304), field day (4), irrigation (75), water (47)

Different Lemon Shape

Sometimes we don't see things that are not uncommon, but suddenly catch our eye.  A recent lemon harvest of a trial in the Central Valley turned up lots of fruit with enlarged nipples on the stylar end.  These are from a 'Limoneira 8A' rootstock trial.  Not all of of the fruit was like this, but all of the rootstocks had these fruit, so it wasn't a rootstock effect.

On asking around it turns out, this happens in other places, for example on Spanish fruit:

And on Australian fruit:

And even in many normal years and orchards there is some of this special fruit

During the 2018 spring bloom there were several heat waves that hit citrus growing areas.  Dr. Mary Lu Arpaia, UCR Fruit Specialist, surmises that high temperatures make for elongated fruit and quite likely impact cell division at the stylar end, as well.  So the more heat spells during bloom, it's likely that we will see more of this fruit shape.  It's still good to eat.

Posted on Wednesday, March 6, 2019 at 6:34 AM
Tags: citrus (304), climate change (4), heat (5), lemon (93)

How We Think About GMOs

A recent article from the Journal of Agricultural Education explorers how group decisions are often made.

 

CHAMPAIGN, Ill. -- A tiny insect, no bigger than the head of a pin, is threatening to topple the multibillion-dollar citrus industry in the U.S. by infecting millions of acres of orchards with an incurable bacterium called citrus greening disease.

The battle to save the citrus industry is pitting crop producers and a team of agriculture researchers - including agricultural communications professor Taylor K. Ruth of the University of Illinois - against a formidable brown bug, the Asian citrus psyllid, which spreads the disease.

Trees infected with the disease, also called Huanglongbing or HB, bear small, misshapen, bitter-tasting green fruit and often die within five years. Currently, there's no known cure for the disease, which has cost the U.S. citrus industry billions of dollars in crop production and thousands of jobs since it was first identified in Florida in 2005, according to agriculture experts.

Among other solutions, scientists are exploring the possibility of breeding genetically modified trees that are resistant to the disease.

But given the controversy over the safety of genetically modified food, scientists need to know whether producers will adopt this technology and whether shoppers will buy and consume GM citrus fruit.

A recent study, funded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, provides some encouraging answers.

Ruth was on a team of scientists from several universities that surveyed a representative sample of U.S. consumers and conducted focus groups to better understand American consumers' attitudes about GM food and agriculture.

About half of the 1,050 people who responded to the survey had positive attitudes toward GM science, the researchers found. Nearly 37 percent of the consumers surveyed felt neutral about GM science and 14 percent had negative perceptions of it.

Most of the people who were receptive to GM science were white males who were millennials or younger, the data indicated. They were highly educated - most held a bachelor's degree or higher - and affluent, with annual incomes of $75,000 or greater.

Women, on the other hand, constituted 64 percent of the group with negative feelings about GM science. Baby boomers and older adults were nearly twice as likely to fall into this group. People in this group also were less educated - about half reported some college but no degree.

The findings were published recently in the journal Science Communication. Co-authors of the paper were Joy N. Rumble, of Ohio State University; Alexa J. Lamm, of the University of Georgia; Traci Irani, of the University of Florida; and Jason D. Ellis, of Kansas State University.

Since social contexts influence public opinion on contentious issues, the survey also assessed respondents' willingness to share their opinions about GM science, their current perceptions of others' views on the topic and what they expected public opinion about it to be in the future.

The research team was particularly interested in exploring the potential impact of the "spiral of silence" theory, a hypothesis on public opinion formation that states in part that people who are highly vocal about their opinions in public encourage others with similar views to speak out while effectively silencing those who hold opposite views.

"If people believe the majority of others disagree with them on a topic, they will feel pressure to conform to the majority opinion," Ruth said.

"People aren't going to be supportive of something if nobody else is supportive of it - no one wants to feel like they are different from the group. That's the reality of the world that we live in today."

By contrast, people surveyed who rejected GM science were more likely to express their opinion when they believed others held the opposite view. But people with positive feelings about GM technology were less likely to speak out when they believed others supported it too.

"The way others express their attitude has an indirect effect on what our attitude ends up being," Ruth said. "We might fall in the actual majority opinion about some of these complex topics, but if other people aren't vocalizing their opinions, we don't know that others out there are like-minded.

"Then we start to think 'Well, maybe I should realign my attitude to what I'm seeing in the media.' What we see in the media is just reflective of the most dominant voice in the conversation, not necessarily the majority opinion. And I think sometimes people don't quite understand that."

Like climate change, GM science is among the complex challenges that some researchers call "wicked issues" - societal problems that are often poorly understood and fraught with conflict, even when the public is provided with relevant science and facts, Ruth, Rumble, Lamm and Ellis wrote in a related study.

That paper was published recently in the Journal of Agricultural Education.

"We must have these conversations about these wicked issues," Ruth said. "If scientists let other people who don't have a scientific background fill the void, we're not going to be a part of that conversation and help people make decisions based upon all of the facts."

https://news.illinois.edu/view/6367/750780

To reach Taylor Ruth, call 217-300-6442; email tkruth@illinois.edu

The paper “A model for understanding decision-making related to agriculture and natural resource science and technology” is available online or from the News Bureau

DOI: 10.5032/jae.2018.04224

The paper “Are Americans' attitudes toward GM science really negative? An academic examination of attitudes and willingness to expose attitudes“ is available online or from the News Bureau

DOI:  10.1177/1075547018819935

mandarin trees loaded
mandarin trees loaded

Posted on Thursday, February 28, 2019 at 5:30 PM
Tags: citrus (304), climate change (4), gmo (1)

Learning How to Spray Trees Better

Dr. Peter Ako Larbi is a Cooperative Extension Specialist in agricultural engineering with UC ANR. As part of his research and extension program, his focus is on developing and promoting best practices for safe, economical, and environmentally sound pesticide application with reduced environmental risks. He is based at the Kearney Agricultural Research and Extension Center in Parlier. 

Prior to joining ANR, Dr. Larbi had been an Assistant Professor of Agricultural Systems Technology in the College of Agriculture at Arkansas State University since 2014. He developed an integrated teaching and research program related to agricultural systems technology; developed and managed research in precision agriculture, agricultural machinery systems, remote sensing and sensor technology; and provided service to the university, college, local community and general scientific community. He held a joint appointment in the Division of Agriculture at University of Arkansas.

From 2012 to 2014, Dr. Larbi was a postdoctoral research associate at the Center for Precision and Automated Agricultural Systems at Washington State University. From 2011 to 2012, he was a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Florida Citrus Research and Education Center.

Larbi earned a Ph.D. in agricultural and biological engineering from University of Florida and a M.Sc. and a B.Sc. in agricultural engineering from Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology in Kumasi, Ghana.

Dr. Larbi invites you to kindly take the following needs assessment survey to help him assess outreach, education, and training needs in pesticide spray application to better plan and implement a program that serves the people of California well:

https://ucdavis.co1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_0qvaddZ6Se5QIrr

Please contact him at palarbi@ucanr.edu if you need further information. Thank you very much for your assistance.

citrus spray blast
citrus spray blast

Posted on Friday, February 15, 2019 at 7:04 AM
Tags: citrus (304), pesticides (23), spray (6)

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