Subtropical Fruit Crops Research & Education
University of California
Subtropical Fruit Crops Research & Education

Posts Tagged: irrigation

Water and Nutrient Management in Avocado and Citrus

Recent talks by UC's new irrigation engineers can help shed light on irrigation improvements that also apply to plant health and better orchard management. The Pourreza talk has implications for identifying HLB infected citrus trees, as well as trees in general stress. The Spann presentation shows how avocado growers will be able to adjust fertilizer applications to their orchards.  These talks are posted on the California Avocado Society website.

 

Below are links to our April Seminar presentations
Click on the presentation title and please make sure to either download or save to your computer
 
 
"Old and New Smart Agriculture"
 
Khaled Bali
Irrigation Specialist, Kearney REC
 
Alireza Pourreza
Assistant Agricultural Mechanization Engineer, UC Davis
 
Tim Spann, PHD
CAC Research Program Director,
 
http://www.californiaavocadosociety.org/seminar-presentations.html 
 
 

avocado irrigation
avocado irrigation

Posted on Friday, May 18, 2018 at 7:20 AM
Tags: avocado (270), drone (2), irrigation (74), nutrients (19), scheduling (10)

Water Magic and How Best to Irrigate New Container-Grown Trees in the Field

This article first appeared in Sacramento Valley Orchard Source

http://www.sacvalleyorchards.com/blog/almonds-blog/why-you-should-irrigate-potted-trees-directly-onto-potting-media/

 

Missing the Target: Why you Should Irrigate Potted Trees Directly onto Potting Media

or

Why Emitters Should be Placed on the Root Ball at Planting

 

Dani Lightle, UCCE Orchards Advisor, Glenn Butte & Tehama Counties

N.B. potted trees are standard commercial container grown citrus and avocado trees

 

Generally, when I am working with growers on a problem related to potted-tree establishment, the cause is lack of water movement into the potted media, creating tree stress. This results from the difference in soil particle size at the boundary between the orchard soil and the tree's potting soil. When you plant a potted tree in your orchard, it has a substrate – some mix of peat and vermiculite – that is very different than your soil type. The change in texture and pore size inhibits water movement from the surrounding soil into the potting media. As a result, Irrigation water applied outside the potted soil media isn't getting to the roots.

The sequence of photos in Figure 1 demonstrates this phenomenon. I set up a mock orchard condition with soil (Tehama series silty loam) next to a potted tree (potting soil) in a ½ inch wide frame. I then slowly added water to match the soil infiltration rate, similar to a drip emitter, approximately 4 inches away from the potting soil in the ‘orchard' soil.

You will see that the water does not move into the potting soil (Figure 1C & D). Two forces – gravitational pull and capillary action – move water downward and laterally in the soil. Since the potting soil is not below the orchard soil, gravity does not move water into the potting soil. Capillary action is not strong enough to move water into the potting soil because the difference in pore size is too great. So, irrigation water goes where it can easily flow – downwards and laterally into dry, native soil but not into the potting soil. More water does not solve the problem, it will just move past your newly planted trees and wet more native soil.

For about the first month of growth, irrigation emitters should be located at the base of the potted tree to ensure the potting medium receives water. Frequently check to ensure that the potting soil stays wet – not the soil somewhere else in the tree row or mound – before, after, and between irrigation sets. The best way to do this is with a small trowel and your hands. Water will need to be applied at the base of the tree until the tree roots grow beyond the potting soil and into your orchard's native soil. The time required for this to happen will vary depending on factors such as temperature, but it should take roughly a month.

 

Figure 1. This sequence of photos shows the movement of water applied to Tehama series silty-loam soil. Water was applied at the blue arrow, approximately 4 inches from the potting soil. Total elapsed time was 51 minutes. Water moved downwards and laterally but did not cross the boundary into the potting soil.

water movement all together
water movement all together

irrigATING CITRUS
irrigATING CITRUS

Posted on Friday, March 2, 2018 at 5:43 AM
  • Author: Dani Lightle
Tags: avocado (270), citrus (301), irrigation (74), planting (8), planting hole (2), planting mix (3), potting mix (2), soil texture (2), water movement (2)

Avocado Seminars Coming Up


Presented by
California Avocado Society, Inc., California Avocado Commission, and University of California Cooperative Extension


 Download all year PDF here.


California Avocado Growers Seminars Series 2018

Scheduled Dates and Topics

 

February Seminar Topic
Pest Monitoring and Management

Speakers:

Mark Hoddle: Extension Specialist in Biological Control at University of California, Riverside

Avocado pests currently here.
Their biology and control.
What pests to expect in the future.
 
Dates/Times/Locations:

Tuesday, February 6, 2018,
1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m.,
UC Cooperative Extension Office Auditorium, 2156 Sierra Way, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401
Wednesday, February 7, 2018,
9:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m.,
UC Cooperative Extension Office Auditorium, 669 County Square Dr. Ventura, CA 93003
Thursday, February 8, 2018,
1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m.,
Fallbrook Public Utility District Board Rm., 990 East Mission Rd. Fallbrook, CA 92028
 

April Seminar Topic
Old and New Smart Agriculture

 

Speakers:

Khaled Bali: Irrigation Specialist, Kearney REC

Alireza Pourreza: Ag Engineer, UC Davis 


Tim Spann: 
California Avocado Commission Research Program Director

In with the Good, Out with the Bad!
What still works:
Soil augers, tensiometers, multisensors with data loggers, soil maps, fertilizer schedules and Crowely's Nutrient Management Calculator.
 

Dates/Times/Locations:

Tuesday, April 17, 2018,
1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m.,
UC Cooperative Extension Office Auditorium, 2156 Sierra Way, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401
Wednesday, April 18, 2018,
9:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m.,
UC Cooperative Extension Office Auditorium, 669 County Square Dr. Ventura, CA 93003
Thursday, April 19, 2018,
1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m.,
Fallbrook Public Utility District Board Rm., 990 East Mission Rd. Fallbrook, CA 92028

June Seminar Topic
Irrigation: Selection of Sensors, Emitters, Injectors and Reading Water Reports

Speaker:
 
Stuart Styles: Director of Irrigation Training & Research Center, Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo.

Selection of sensors, emitters
Reading water reports
Injectors
 

Dates/Times/Locations:

Tuesday, June 5, 2018,
1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m.,
UC Cooperative Extension Office Auditorium, 2156 Sierra Way, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401
Wednesday, June 6, 2018,
9:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m.,
UC Cooperative Extension Office Auditorium, 669 County Square Dr. Ventura, CA 93003
Thursday, June 7, 2018,
1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m.,
Fallbrook Public Utility District Board Rm., 990 East Mission Rd. Fallbrook, CA 92028

August Seminar Topic
Grower Seminar and Field Tour

 

Details to come.

Dates/Times/Locations: One site only

Wednesday, August 1, 2018,
10:00 - 2:00 p.m.,
South Coast Research & Extension Center Conference Room, 7601 Irvine Blvd., Irvine, CA 92818

avocado fruit
avocado fruit

Posted on Wednesday, January 24, 2018 at 8:17 AM
Tags: avocado (270), citrus (301), irrigation (74), tools (1), water (47)

Whas Up in Subtropics?

There's a new Topics in Subtropics Newsletter available:

  • Ah, Rats! ?
  • So You Want To Install Soil Moisture Meters? ?
  • Notes on Applying Gibberellic Acid (GA) to Navels in 
    the Southern San Joaquin Valley of California ?
  • Fall Leaf Tissue Sampling ?
  • FREE!  Citrus:  UC IPM Pest Management  Guidelines

http://ceventura.ucanr.edu/newsletters/Topics_in_Subtropics71533.pdf

Subscribe:

http://ceventura.ucanr.edu/news/Topics_in_Subtropics/

 

 

 

topics
topics

Posted on Wednesday, November 1, 2017 at 5:27 AM
Tags: avocado (270), cherimoya rats (1), citrus (301), irrigation (74), lemon (92), navels (2), soil moisture sensors (1)

Precision Ag? Avocado? Citrus? Cherimoya?

My dad always said that if you can learn one good thing from a meeting, it was a good meeting.  Here's a webinar that might offer something good to for tree growers.  Listen in and make up your mind.

 

Webinar: California & Chile: Opportunities for Precision Agriculture in Climate Change Adaptation and Mitigation.

Monday, October 30th, 2017 9:00 AM – 11:00 AM PDT (Time subject to change)

Agenda & Speakers

Introduction

  • Dr. Amrith Gunasekara, Science Advisor to the Secretary, CDFA

Opening Remarks

  • Dr. Pablo Zamora, Associate Director, UC Davis Chile
  • Marcela Rondon, Agricultural Attaché , USDA FAS

Panel 1: Innovation in precision agriculture

  • Dr. Tom Shapland, Co-founder and CEO, Tule Technologies
  • Andreas Neuman , President, UAV IQ

Panel 2: Seeing it in action: Operations that have successfully adopted precision ag tech

  • Allison Jordan, Vice President of Environmental Affairs, Wine Institute
  • John Erb, Vice President for Sustainable Communities and Resource Solutions, Driscoll's
  • Dr. Alvaro Gonzalez, R&D Assistant Manager of the Center for Research & Innovation, Concha Y Toro

Panel 3: Looking ahead: Promising research into the world of precision agriculture

  • Dr. Chandra Krintz, Professor, UC Santa Barbara
  • Dr. Carlos Flores, Program Coordinator Agronomy and Environment , UC Davis Chile

Register here:

https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/2276456747899022083

 

irrigATING CITRUS
irrigATING CITRUS

Posted on Monday, October 23, 2017 at 6:54 AM

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