Subtropical Fruit Crops Research & Education
University of California
Subtropical Fruit Crops Research & Education

Posts Tagged: pesticide

Pesticide Safety Training - English/EspaƱol - Seguridad de Pesticidas

 Pesticide Safety Instructor TrainingWorkshops

Update your knowledge of changing regulations!

Registration:

http://ipm.ucanr.edu/IPMPROJECT/workshops.html

 

This course meets the requirements established by the revised Worker Protection Standard, which is mandated by the US Environmental Protection Agency and the California Department of Pesticide Regulation. This workshop, presented by the UC Integrated Pest Management Program, AgSafe and support from WCAHS, will qualify participants who successfully complete the program to train fieldworkers and pesticide handlers under these revised regulations. Topics will cover pesticide exposure, signs and symptoms of illness, emergency medical care, proper use of personal protective equipment, safe handling and transportation of pesticides, and laws and regulations regarding labels and safety data sheets.

Who Should Attend?

Ag supervisors   •   Growers   •   Farm Labor Contractors   •   Safety Managers   • Safety Trainers

Cost

$50 per person. Payment is by credit card only.

Continental breakfast, lunch and materials provided. Includes a certificate of completion.

No refunds will be given.

Space is limited, register early!

http://ipm.ucanr.edu/IPMPROJECT/workshops.html

 

Dates

Classes will be from 8:00 a.m. 5:00 p.m. Check-in begins at 7:45am.

                            

January 29

Modesto

English

February 20

Vista

English

 

February 15

Modesto

Spanish

February 20

Vista

Spanish

 

February 12

Santa Paula

English

April 16

Fresno

English

 

February 13

Santa Paula

Spanish

April 18

Fresno

Spanish

Continuing Education hours will be available through California Department of Pesticide Regulations (DPR).

                                                                                                                                                                     

Seguridad de Pesticidas Talleres de Formación de Instructores

Actualicé su conocimiento sobre los cambios regulatorios!

Este curso cumple con los requisitos revisados por la Norma de Protección del Trabajador, que es un mandato de la Agencia de Protección Ambiental de Estados Unidos y el Departamento de Regulación de Pesticidas de California. Este taller, presentado por el Programa de Manejo Integrado de Plagas de la Universidad de California y AgSafe, con apoyo de WCAHS, calificará a los participantes que completen el programa con la capacidad de entrenar a trabajadores de campo y manejadores de pesticidas bajo estas regulaciones revisadas. Los temas cubren la exposición a plaguicidas, síntomas de la enfermedad, la atención médica de emergencia, el uso adecuado del equipo de protección personal, manipulación y transporte seguro de los plaguicidas y las leyes y reglamentos relativos a las etiquetas y fichas de datos de seguridad.

¿Quién debeasistir?

Supervisores agrícolas • Productores • Contratistas de trabajadores agrícolas Supervisores de seguridad • Entrenadores de seguridad

Costo

$50 por persona. El pago es solamente con tarjeta de crédito.

Desayuno, almuerzo y los materiales serán proporcionados. Incluye un certificado de finalización. No se darán reembolsos.

¡El espacio es limitado, regístrese temprano!

Fechas

Clases empiezan a las 8:00 a.m. 5:00 p.m. Registración empieza a las 7:45am.

 

29 de enero

Modesto

Inglés

20 de febrero

Vista

Inglés

 

15 de febrero

Modesto

Español

21 de febrero

Vista

Español

 

12 de febrero

Santa Paula

Inglés

16 de abril

Fresno

Inglés

 

13 de febrero

Santa Paula

Español

18 de abril

Fresno

Español

danger sign
danger sign

Posted on Wednesday, January 16, 2019 at 6:48 AM
Tags: pesticide (9), saftery (1), training (7), workshop (4)

Dust and Roundup

Agronomy and Weed Science Advisor, Merced County

It's getting hot and dry in the Central Valley and the movement of equipment in and out of fields/orchards/vineyards has the potential to stir up a significant amount of dust. Among its other impacts to agriculture (soil erosion, tissue damage, reduced photosynthesis, etc...), wind blown dust can reduce the efficacy of glyphosate, which is an important tool for the  management of weeds in trees and vines, along rights-of-ways, and in glyphosate-tolerant agronomic crops (e.g. corn, cotton, alfalfa) in CA.

The adoption of glyphosate has been facilitated, at least in part, by it's relative lack of soil activity (Miller et al. 2013; Zhou et al. 2006). Glyphosate can become tightly adsorbed to soil particles (depending on clay and organic matter content, pH, cation exchange capacity, etc...), thereby reducing the potential for crop injury via root uptake. The ability of glyphosate to bind to soil also contributes to it's reduced efficacy in certain situations. Specifically, dust that settles on weed leaf surfaces (Figure 1) can negatively impact glyphosate performance due to binding/inactivation.

Figure 1. Dirt on field bindweed (Convolvulus arvensis) leaves

 

The detrimental effects of dust on glyphosate performance have been described by Zhou et al. (2006) and Boerboom et al. 2006). Results from Zhou et al. (2006) showed that dust applied to the surface of eastern black (Solanum ptychanthum) and hairy (Solanum sarrachoides) nightshades reduced weed control, with greater amounts of dust resulting in greater reductions in herbicide efficacy (Figure 2). In a study conducted by Boerboom et al. (2006), dust was deposited over the tops of plots of common lambsquarters (Chenopodium album); water was then used to remove the dust treatment from ½ of the plots prior to a glyphosate application. Similar to the results achieved by Zhou et al. (2006), the occurrence of dust visually reduced common lambsquarters control (relative to the plots where the dust had been washed away). Results from both sets of studies show that dust generation has the potential to significantly impact glyphosate performance'

Figure 2. Percent reduction in weed control by glyphosate as affected by the rate of a silty clay dust applied to the leaves of two nightshade species. Greater numbers on the Y-axis indicated greater reductions in control.

Adapted from Zhou et al. (2006) Weed Science 54:1132-1136.

 

A few closing thoughts about dust and it's impact on weed control:

  • Be mindful of how soil disturbance (cultivation, farm traffic, etc...) affects dust production.
  • Make glyphosate applications in advance of crop production events that are likely to generate substantial amounts of dust.
  • Sprinkler irrigation may be able to remove dust from the leaves of weeds under some situations. Glyphosate applications should be made after the leaves have dried but before more dust can be deposited.
  • Soil particles in spray water can also bind to glyphosate and reduce herbicide efficacy; only clean water should be used to fill spray tanks. (Not actually dust related, but a good practice to remember)

 

Citations:

Boerboom, C. et al. (2006) Factors affecting glyphosate control of common lambsquarters. Proceedings of the North Central Weed Science Society 61:54.

Miller, T. et al. (2013) Glyphosate stewardship: Maintaining the effectiveness of a widely used herbicide. ANR Publication 8492. https://anrcatalog.ucanr.edu/pdf/8492.pdf

Zhou, J. et al. (2006) Soil dust reduces glyphosate efficacy. Weed Science 54:1132-1136.

 

Note: An earlier version of this post is available at the following website: http://treefruit.wsu.edu/dust-can-affect-weed-control-with-glyphosate/

Posted on Monday, July 2, 2018 at 6:38 AM
  • Author: Lynn M. Sosnoskie
Tags: efficacy (1), glyphosate (6), herbicide (11), pesticide (9)

And Now Paraquat

A recent call about the poor control of marestail (horseweed, Conyza canadensis) to glyphosate (Roundup®) wasn't surprising, but that paraquat didnt do the trick was.  It turns out that there is multiple resistance to the materials.  If horseweed is resistant to glyphosate it is possibly going to be resistant to paraguat  which also means that hairy fleabane which has glyphosate resistance could also show resistance to paraquat.  A recent study reports on the increased Conyza resistance to paraquat (Distribution of Conyza sp. in Orchards of California and Response to Glyphosate and Paraquat, Moretti et alhttps://doi.org/10.1614/WS-D-15-00174.1):

Resistance to glyphosate in hairy fleabane and horseweed is a problem in orchards and vineyards in California. Population genetic analyses suggest that glyphosate resistance evolved multiple times in both species, but it is unknown if resistance to other herbicides is also present. Two approaches of research were undertaken to further evaluate herbicide resistance in Conyza sp. in the perennial crop systems of California. In the initial study, the distribution of Conyza sp. in the Central Valley, using a semistructured field survey, was coupled with evaluation of the presence and level of glyphosate resistance in plants grown from field-collected seed. In a subsequent study, single-seed descendants representing distinct genetic groups were self-pollinated in the greenhouse and these accessions were evaluated for response to glyphosate and paraquat. Conyza sp. were commonly found throughout the Central Valley and glyphosate-resistant individuals were confirmed in all field collections of both species. The level of glyphosate resistance among field collections varied from 5- to 21-fold compared with 50% glyphosate resistance (GR50) of the susceptible, with exception of one region with a GR50 similar to the susceptible. When self-pollinated accessions from different genetic groups were screened, the level of glyphosate resistance, on the basis of GR50 values, ranged from 1.7- to 42.5-fold in hairy fleabane, and 5.9- to 40.3-fold in horseweed. Three accessions of hairy fleabane from different genetic groups were also resistant to paraquat (40.1- to 352.5-fold). One glyphosate-resistant horseweed accession was resistant to paraquat (322.8-fold), which is the first confirmed case in California. All paraquat-resistant accessions of Conyza sp. identified so far have also been resistant to glyphosate, probably because glyphosate resistance is already widespread in the state. Because glyphosate and paraquat resistances are found across a wide geographical range and in accessions from distinct genetic groups, multiple resistant Conyza sp. likely developed independently several times in California.

conyza avocado
conyza avocado

Posted on Friday, June 1, 2018 at 9:32 AM
Tags: avocado (287), citrus (335), fleabane (2), hairy (1), herbicide (11), horseweed (6), marestail (4), pesticide (9), resistance (13)

Area-Wide Treatments for Ventura ACP

For the past 18 months, a team led by University of California research entomologist Beth Grafton-Cardwell has been conducting an Asian citrus psyllid monitoring project to determine the efficacy of Ventura County's area-wide ACP suppression strategy. Based on her analysis of the survey data, Dr. Grafton-Cardwell has recommended changes in the area-wide management (AWM) protocol to provide better control of the invasive pest. The Ventura County ACP-HLB Task Force has endorsed her recommendations and incorporated them into the AWM schedule for 2018-2019.

The primary change will be the addition of a second fall treatment, which may be a perimeter spray, for lemons and mandarins. Fall is when ACP populations reach their highest level, and the research data indicate a single pesticide application is inadequate. The research data also show that ACP is most abundant on grove perimeters, and only expands into the center rows when the population is large. In recognition of this, the new Task Force protocol allows one of the two fall applications to be applied to only the grove perimeter, as long as the grower, grove manager or PCA/PCO has scouted the orchard and determined that center rows are free of ACP nymphs on flush. The other fall application, however, must cover the entire grove.

As in previous cycles, the treatment window for each psyllid management area (PMA) will last three weeks, but it now will overlap with the next window by two weeks instead of one. This will compress each treatment cycle from four months in length to two and a half months, heightening the area-wide effect. (See below for the schedule.)

The annual AWM program for lemons and mandarins will now consist of four applications: a coordinated AWM whole-orchard treatment in winter, individual applications of an ACP-effective material (either alone or piggybacked on a spray for another pest) in late spring-early summer, and two coordinated AWM treatments in late summer and fall (one of which may be a perimeter spray).

The annual cycle for oranges, which do not flush year-round, remains two coordinated applications, one during the first fall window and one in the winter. For organic growers, each "treatment" must consist of two applications of Entrust and oil or Pyganic and oil, or other approved alternative material, to compensate for their limited residual activity. The list of approved materials for both conventional and organic operations is at http://ipm.ucanr.edu/PMG/r107304411.html.

Members of the Ventura County citrus community are invited to a workshop to learn more about these changes, and the research data upon which they are based. The workshop will be from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. on Thursday, April 26, at the Agriculture Museum, 929 Railroad Ave., Santa Paula. Attendance is free, but advance registration is required. Please register online at: https://vctaskforce-workshop.eventbrite.com.

During the workshop, Dr. Grafton-Cardwell will present findings from her continuing survey of ACP populations across the county, including data on the effects of AWM pesticide treatments on ACP abundance. Other speakers will present updates on the statewide Citrus Pest and Disease Prevention Program, the status of Huanglongbing disease in California, and grower participation in the local ACP suppression effort.

The Task Force is also planning outdoor workshops to help grove owners, managers or farm employees develop an effective ACP scouting strategy. Topics will include how to scout for ACP, and how to identify symptoms of HLB. More information will be distributed in coming weeks.

The following is the new schedule for Fall 2018 and Winter 2019 treatments, organized by groups of PMAs. Overview maps of Ventura County's PMA boundaries are available at http://www.farmbureauvc.com/issues/pest-issues/asian-citrus-psyllid#task-force

Individual maps of Ventura County's PMA boundaries, along with many other documents pertaining to the Ventura County AWM program, can be viewed or downloaded at

bit.ly/VC-AWM-docs.

As was the case with the previous AWM treatment cycles, growers will be notified about the date of their treatment window either by their packinghouse field reps, their PCAs or by the Ventura County grower liaisons: Sandra Zwaal (szwaal2@gmail.com) and Cressida Silvers (cressidasb@gmail.com). It will be up to growers to work with their PCAs and applicators to schedule those treatments.

ACP adult and nymph
ACP adult and nymph

Posted on Wednesday, April 18, 2018 at 5:47 AM
Tags: acp (86), area-wide spray (2), asian citrus psyllid (57), citrus (335), hlb (69), huanglongbing (66), pesticide (9)

What's that Weed? And What Does Herbicide Damage Look Like?

Plant-out-of-place photo galleries:

http://wric.ucdavis.edu/photo_gallery/photo_gallery.htm

http://ipm.ucanr.edu/PMG/weeds_intro.html

Horseweed - Conyza canadensis

 

Herbicide treatment table for citrus:

http://ipm.ucanr.edu/PMG/r107700411.html

 

And if you are wondering what herbicide damage might look like on various plant species (this is heavily weighted to annuals and landscape plants):

http://herbicidesymptoms.ipm.ucanr.edu/index.cfm

Blueberry herbicide damage

Posted on Monday, March 19, 2018 at 6:42 AM
Tags: avocado (287), citrus (335), herbicides (18), herbologist (1), lemon (100), pesticide (9), weeds (32)

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