Subtropical Fruit Crops Research & Education
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Subtropical Fruit Crops Research & Education

Mandatory Tarping of Transported Citrus Fruit to Control ACP - Part 2

A new ruling from CDFA to modify the announcement from March 2.  Read on:

CDFA suspends enforcement of new citrus rule

 

The California Department of Food and Agriculture announced March 2 that it was suspending enforcement of a new regulation regarding transport of bulk citrus, the day after the new rule took effect.

The department said "the decision was made as a courtesy to the citrus industry to allow for additional time to prepare citrus operations to comply with the new rule, which requires all bulk citrus loads to be fully covered regardless of the origin or the destination. Additionally, CDFA is continuing to process and return compliance agreements."

Although enforcement has been suspended indefinitely, CDFA is expecting haulers to voluntarily abide by the new rule. Compliance can be achieved several ways, including but not limited to the use of a shipping container, tarp, enclosed vehicle (including curtain vans), or another method that completely covers bulk citrus during transport. If using a tarp, tarps must reach the bed of the truck. 

 From March 2, 2017

From AgNet West, http://agnetwest.com/2017/02/27/citrus-tarping-starts-march-1/

As of March 1, 2017, all citrus loads traveling throughout the state of California have to be tarped. This regulation aims to reduce the accidental transportation of the Asian citrus psyllid (ACP).

The Citrus Pest and Disease Prevention Program (CPDPP) is helping to get the word out about the new regulation. “That regulation is stating that every load, regardless of origin or destination, must be tarped,” CPDPP Grower Liaison Erin Betts said. “You don't have to use a tarp. You can use a van or something that is completely covered on all four sides, down to the bed.”

Counties north of the grapevine region have been noticing a trend with ACP finds in the area, and the new tarping regulation hopes to limit some of the accidental transportation the industry is seeing. “When we started having finds, they were all along the major transportation corridors,” Betts said. “So if we cover these loads that are coming and going from wherever, we are preventing that psyllid from hopping off … at a stop light or a stop sign in the middle of the Citrus Belt, Kern County or anywhere.”


All citrus loads being transported in California will now have to be fully covered by tarps. The state passed an emergency law that makes tarping mandatory in an attempt to reduce the accidental spread of the Asian citrus psyllid (ACP).

From the Citrus Pest and Disease Prevention Program (CPDPP):
The California Office of Administrative Law approved an emergency rule that requires all bulk citrus loads to be fully tarped during transport regardless of where the load originates from or its destination. The statewide mandatory tarping regulation is in response to a recommendation from the Citrus Pest and Disease Prevention Committee (CPDPC) to prevent the spread of the Asian citrus psyllid. The California Department of Food and Agriculture will begin contacting growers, haulers and packers to re-sign compliance agreements that include the tarping requirement. These entities are urged to begin preparations now while they wait to receive new compliance agreements.

Why did the Citrus Pest & Disease Prevention Committee ask for a mandatory tarping regulation?

The statewide mandatory tarping regulation is a preventive action to address the spread of the Asian citrus psyllid, and is in response to an analysis conducted by the University of California that looked at Asian citrus psyllid find patterns along transportation corridors. As the number of psyllid finds increase in commercial citrus regions and along major transportation corridors, the CPDPC felt the action was a necessary step to help prevent the spread of Huanglongbing – the deadly citrus tree disease that the psyllid can carry.

What are the regulatory requirements?

The new requirement is a statewide regulation that restricts the movement of regulated articles from “or within” a quarantine area. Revised compliance agreement exhibits will require all bulk citrus loads to be fully tarped regardless of where the load originates from or its destination, even loads that are traveling within a county. Specifics of the requirements will be released soon. In the meantime, producers can review USDA's tarping compliance requirements for general guidelines. Read the full press release from the CPDPP.


New tarping rules are in effect for California citrus. The industry must comply, or it will face costly penalties. Tarping fines could add up to $10,000.

A new regulation requires citrus loads to be tarped or fully enclosed as they travel through the state. “There were new compliance agreements that were mailed out,” Citrus Pest and Disease Prevention Program Grower Liaison Erin Betts said. “The new regulation states that every load, regardless of origin or destination, must be tarped.”

Betts said not complying with the new rules can be very costly. “The fine is not only for if you don't have your load tarped properly, but also if you do not have your compliance agreement with you,” Betts said. “That violation could be up to $10,000.”

According to Betts, the industry has many ways to make sure they are properly complying with the regulation. “(The industry) can contact the county, local grower liaisons and also the California Department of Food and Agriculture.”

Posted on Monday, March 6, 2017 at 5:48 AM
Tags: ACP (48), Asian Citrus Psyllid (30), citrus (188), grapefruit (18), HLB (31), huanglongbing (39), invasives (6), lemon (47), mandarin (34), orange (38)

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