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Food news from the UC Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources
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Comments:
by Jack Sanders
on July 9, 2015 at 10:50 AM
Interested in reading about clamming up North, reminds me of my days clamming on Cape Cod years ago. If I am correct, the vibrio bacterium is the cause of cholera also.
by Chris M Brunner
on July 9, 2015 at 2:24 PM
Jack,  
 
Yes, you're correct. The causative agent for cholera is Vibrio cholerae. While V. cholerae is endemic to the clamming area, and occasionally isolated, it is more commonly found in fresh/brackish water than in marine waters. This is not necessarily cause for concern; in order for a vibrio to actually cause disease it has to contain particular genes, referred to as virulence factors, which makes finding truly pathogenic bacteria especially rare.  
 
Thanks for your comment,  
Melissa
by Chris M Brunner
on July 9, 2015 at 3:30 PM
Read more about Vibrio cholera infection. http://www.cdc.gov/cholera/general/
by Lilly C
on September 9, 2019 at 9:56 AM
Hi! I am a student in highschool and I am doing a semester project on clamming in the Bay area. I am planning on going Clamming at Campbell Cove, Dillon Beach, Lawsons landing, and Bolinas beach. I need to interview/talk/meet with an experienced clammer. Please send an email over or respond to my blog post as soon as possible!  
 
Thank you so much and hope to hear from some of you!
by Chris M Brunner
on September 18, 2019 at 11:26 AM
Dear Lilly,  
 
Dr. Melissa Partyka is now working on the Gulf Coast and she would be happy to correspond with you. You can find her contact information on the website for Auburn University under School of Fisheries, Aquaculture and Aquatic Sciences,https://sfaas.auburn.edu/faculty-staff/ Dr. Partyka continues to conduct research of bacteria associated with clams and oysters.
 
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