ANR Employees
University of California
ANR Employees

2014 New Call for Positions

This proposal has been formally submitted for the 2014 cycle.

Position Details

057 Siskiyou County Livestock and Natural Resources Advisor

Proposed Location/Housing

UCCE Siskiyou County

Proposed Area of Coverage

Siskiyou County

Contacts

Associated Documents

Comments

16 Comments

1
The Siskiyou County Livestock and Natural Resources Advisor document accurately describes the importance of the position in Siskiyou County. In addition Siskiyou County livestock producers have limited direct access to Universities for assistance because of the distance factor. The climate in Siskiyou County is much different than the climate in the interior valleys of California, requiring different management practices to ensure efficient operation. Siskiyou County is one of the most biologically diverse counties in the nation. Producers are subject to more scrutiny now than ever before. People with environmental concerns and animal rights concerns are constantly looking for reasons to condem ranching operations. A local Livestock and Natural Resource Advisor could provide assistance and help producers stay in production while mimimizing impacts to our ecosystem. If ranchers are to continue to utilize range allotments through the BLM and USFS they need to be aware of best management practices as they develop to mitigate impacts to range allotments. We desperately need to continue to produce renewable natural resources in Siskiyou County. Ranching is one of the main viable industries left in Siskiyou County that still does that.

Another critical element is the need to keep new information coming to interested youth. Fewer young people are being attracted to the ranching industry because many see the adversity their parents are facing and are not interested in carrying on the burden. The Advisor can keep potential young producers interested by brining new concepts and ideas forward.
Posted Jun 30, 2014 4:30 PM by Patrick Griffin
2
I failed to mention an important issue when I filed my earlier comment. Wolves will likely become part of California's ecosystem within the very near future as the range of Oregon wolves continue to expand. Wolves will probably enter California through Siskiyou County and become established here before moving further into California. There will be new management challenges for the ranchers who will be sharing their range with wolves. Livestock losses will likely be a result of wolf presence in California. Wolves cause lethal impacts to livestock as well as non lethal impacts resulting in lower conception rates, lower weight gains, sub-lethal injuries and livestock become much more difficult to handle. Since the wolf will be listed as an endangered species here in California, ranchers will be asked to implement sub-lethal wolf control measures to limit impacts by wolves. The input and guidance from the Livestock Advisor will be very important to ranchers who will be changing their management practices to limit their losses associated with wolves. Please consider this important issue when deciding where to place the livestock advisors in California.

Thank You,

Patirck J. Griffin
SIskiyou County Agricultural Commissioner
Posted Jul 7, 2014 9:01 AM by Patrick Griffin, Siskiyou County Agricultural Commissioner
3
Steve's write up is spot on. I would emphasize the unique nature of the resource base and conditions, the socio-political nature of agriculture in the county and the need for innovative thinking toward resolution of production issues and resource conservation/recovery conflict. A candidate should have an ability to grasp and impact big-picture system issues while looking forward to a changing environment influence by climatological conditions. The importance of the hay/pasture-livestock system to Siskiyou Co. agriculture and economic growth can't be overstated and the lack of an active advisor in the animal management portion of the equation is detrimental. Many of the NRCS customers comment on the lack of filling this position and the need for having an active farm advisor for cattle production in the face of the growing pressures of the NCRWQCB's Conditional Waiver Program/TMDL, CA-DFW ESA enforcement, place of origin, drought, etc. NRCS Yreka whole heartedly supports this position and looks forward to developing the same close collaborative relationship that we have had with Steve and Dan Drake, with the new advisor.
Posted Jul 7, 2014 10:49 AM by James Patterson
4
The County of Siskiyou is very supportive of the proposed postion of Livestock and Natural Resources advisor position. The County relies heavily on its natural resources including livestock and crop production as a main source of our local economy. This position is a critical need and a valuable resource to assist local ranchers and farmers in the implementation of innovative strategies and best practices. This postion will be invaluable as the County continues to struggle with effects of the worst drought in California history. Your consideration in approving this position is greatly appreciated.
Posted Jul 7, 2014 12:07 PM by Tom A. Odom, County Administrator
5
Siskyou is one the largestcounties in the state yet one of the poorer
counties. agiculture is our only revenue sourse
Posted Jul 7, 2014 7:22 PM by jack cowley
6
I graduated from college 25 years ago, but my education didn't stop there. I continue to consume and digest the information I glean from the Ag advisors of the wonderful UC system. Their studies propagate thoughts and questions and most often produce answers to help make our operations sustainable.
Up here in Siskiyou Co. we are geographically challenged to feasibly (financially and time spent) to continue our education. This last Fall I travelled to your field station in Brown's Valley to attend the drought seminar and I have been able to share with my comrades and implement several of the ideas presented. The UC's generosity of a financial sponsorship made this all possible. Thank you for all you do. I felt an obligation to agriculture in Siskiyou Co. to take the time to learn and to try to teach others who could not attend because of the vacancy of our livestock advisor position. Bottom line, we are far away from these educational opportunities.
The size of our county also presents a problem. Because of its vastness, we do need our own livestock advisor. Since Dan Drake's retirement, Larry Forerro from Shasta Co. has been doing some filling in and we really appreciate his commitment to our viability, but it is really too much for one man. We need our own livestock advisor.
We all know how difficult it is to make a living in agriculture. This career I have chosen is not a get rich quick and retire in 25 years with a great pension and maybe a gold watch as our reward of committed service. It is however, a career of great satisfaction knowing I help put food on families' tables and provide sustenance to continue living for another generation of this great nation.
Siskiyou Co. is an extremely impoverished county in such an affluent state. We lost the logging industry due to the spotted owl, mining is almost nonexistent and farming and ranching is suffering greatly due to the Coho salmon. These are the industries that built this county of Siskiyou and farming and ranching is all we have left to funnel money into our communities. We need protect what we have remaining and the involvement of the UC system through our own livestock advisor will be key to the survival of agriculture in Siskiyou County.
Thank you for your consideration and I am expecting a positive outcome.
Sincerely,
Scott Murphy
Just a rancher
Posted Jul 16, 2014 12:07 PM by Scott Murphy
7
State of California
10th District Agricultural Association/Siskiyou Golden Fairgrounds
1712 Fairlane Road, Yreka CA 96097
Phone: 530-842-2767 Fax: 530-842-4724
Website: www.sisqfair.com Email: info@sisqfair.com

Promoting excellence in agriculture awareness and education.


July 16, 2014

As the immediate past president of the Siskiyou County Cattlemen’s Association and the current CEO of the 10th District Agricultural Association I would like to express how important a Livestock/Natural Resources Position is to Siskiyou County. Siskiyou County is over 1000 square miles larger than the State of Connecticut and has a unique high dessert climate in the east with high mountain valleys to the west, climate that is not shared with the counties to our south. The local beef cattle industry is forage based. Local producers rely upon irrigated pasture, rangeland (private and public), crop aftermath and hay as feed sources. Access to timely irrigation water is key to our sustainability. Over the past several years between the drought and regulatory challenges, water availability has impacted our membership significantly. We need a livestock farm advisor to work with our membership on the evaluation of different for livestock forages, grazing management and economics to remain sustainable. Beef cattle producers continue to need to address genetics, reproduction, nutrition, and animal health issues. The livestock farm advisor is our link to the University of California from our frontier like county here in the far north state.
Siskiyou County is depressed economically. Agriculture is one of the largest contributors to our economy. It is important that local farmers and ranchers have access to the best information possible to remain viable. Siskiyou County is a large county totaling over 4 million acres with a number of small communities. Travel is largely on mountainous two lane roads, in fact, it takes longer to travel west to east across Siskiyou County from Somes Bar to Tulelake than it does to drive down Interstate 5 from Yreka to Sacramento. Some of our membership does not have internet access. The closest university or college with an agriculture program is Chico State. Cooperative Extension serves an important broker of un-biased information in our County. As the county fair CEO, This position is vital to our agricultural youth and the adults that utilize opportunities that expand knowledge that will sustain agriculture in our county. From livestock genetics and ultrasound to drought tolerant feed stuffs, our livestock farm advisor has worked tirelessly to improve this way of life for agriculturalists. The fair works closely with our cattlemen’s association and our extension office to expand this knowledge and hope we can fill this vacant position as soon as possible.
It is important that you allocate this Livestock/Natural Resource Position to Siskiyou County. Please contact me at 530-842-2767 if I can provide additional information.
Sincerely,

Cliff Munson, CEO

Posted Jul 16, 2014 1:53 PM by Cliff Munson, 10th District Agricultural Assocition CEO
8
At a recent board of directors meeting of the Siskiyou County Cattlemen’s Association we agreed to send comments associated with the livestock farm advisor position. Siskiyou County has a short season climate. The local beef cattle industry is forage based. Local producers rely upon irrigated pasture, rangeland (private and public), crop aftermath and hay as feed sources. Access to timely irrigation water is key to our sustainability. Over the past several years between the drought and regulatory challenges, water is availability has impacted our membership significantly. We need a livestock farm advisor to work with our membership on the evaluation of different for livestock forages, grazing management and economics to remain sustainable. Beef cattle producers continue to need to address genetics, reproduction, nutrition, and animal health issues. The livestock farm advisor is our link to the University of California.

Siskiyou County is depressed economically. Agriculture is one of the largest contributors to our economy. It is important that local farmers and ranchers have access to the best information possible to remain viable. Siskiyou County is a large county totaling over 4 million acres with a number of small communities. Travel is largely on mountainous two lane roads. Some of our membership does not have internet access. The closest university or college with an agriculture program is Chico State. Cooperative Extension serves an important broker of un-biased information in our County.

It is important that you allocate this Livestock/Natural Resource Position to Siskiyou Count. Please contact me at 530-340-2459 if I can provide additional information.

Sincerely,

Mark Coats, President
Siskiyou County Cattlemen’s Association

Posted Jul 16, 2014 2:01 PM by Mark Coates, President Siskiyou County Cattlemen
9
It is critical to fill this vacancy for Siskiyou County for several reasons:

1. Geographical size and distance from the nearest Livestock Specialist is a significant limiting factor currently;

2. Reintroduction of the wolf and the impact that will have on livestock production will require a need for knowledge on how best to deal with the challenges ahead;

3. Water issues are at the forefront in Siskiyou County and the local specialist provides much needed scientifically sound insight on solving challenges;

4. Livestock production provides critical jobs and revenue for the county and producers rely heavily on the expertise of the local specialist;

5. Range management is crucial for our ranches and having an individual to help provide insight on management is invaluable; and

6. Lack of internet access due to the remote rural landscape places added need for a specialist to be able to share scientific advances directly with the producers.
Posted Jul 17, 2014 10:36 PM by Jeff Fowle
10
This position was and is a benefit to the community. A lot of people relied on Dan Drake's expertise; he performed experiments on alfalfa and crops and went out and assisted farmers and ranchers in a variety of ways. He informed people about programs and experiments and trials that helped improve agriculture. We are first and foremost, Siskiyou County is an agricultural region and that is where locals can use the benefit of a governmental link. He provided a resource to local farmers and ranchers that helped improve their production and operations. Because producers can't travel, he brought information and ideas to us. We need an informed and practical-minded individual who knows the area and is from the agricultural world who can influence potential changes and improvements in agric and government. We support filling this position.
Posted Jul 18, 2014 6:46 AM by Doug and Gail Jenner
11
This position was and is a benefit to the community. A lot of people relied on Dan Drake's expertise; he performed experiments on alfalfa and crops and went out and assisted farmers and ranchers in a variety of ways. He informed people about programs and experiments and trials that helped improve agriculture. First and foremost, Siskiyou County is an agricultural region and that is where locals can use the benefit of a governmental link. He provided a resource to local farmers and ranchers that helped improve their production and operations. Because producers can't travel, he brought information and ideas to us. We need an informed and practical-minded individual who knows the area and is from the agricultural world who can influence potential changes and improvements in agric and government. We support filling this position.
Posted Jul 18, 2014 6:48 AM by Doug and Gail Jenner
12
Others have made the case well, but I’ll repeat it for emphasis: Livestock is extremely important to the agriculture industry and the overall economy in Siskiyou County. The county’s unique climate and remote geography make a locally based UC Cooperative Extension adviser a vital link connecting family ranchers to the latest scientific research. That information is invaluable in helping them to improve their herds and produce the most value from increasingly scarce resources.

No less important, Siskiyou County’s ranchers have found themselves at the center of contentious public arguments and legal battles over the right balance between pasture irrigation and fisheries in the Klamath River watershed. On-the-ground research that can bring scientifically valid and economically viable solutions to ranchers can ensure that family livestock producers thrive sustainably for future generations even as we restore runs of the threatened coho salmon and other fisheries in the basin.

I appreciate the University’s careful consideration of this position. If you need any further assistance, please contact my District Director, Bruce Ross, at (530) 223-6300.
Posted Jul 18, 2014 4:06 PM by Assemblyman Brian Dahle, 1st District
13
The California Rangeland Conservation Coalition (Rangeland Coalition) would like to express support for the Livestock and Natural Resources Advisor position in Siskiyou County.

The Rangeland Coalition is an unprecedented group of ranchers, environmental organizations, scientists and government agencies who are major California rangeland stakeholders. Together, signatories strive to enhance and preserve private working landscapes. We feel strongly a need for this position that working across disciplines will play an essential role in the development and application of science-based recommendations to maximize the provision of ecosystem services such as forage productivity, wildlife habitat, invasive species control and an adequate and reliable water supply for California. This position will provide critical insights to guide rangeland management, and outreach, along with playing a pivotal role in meeting the objectives stated in the Rangeland Coalition Strategic Plan.

Rangeland Coalition signatories are confident that this position would provide the expertise required to translate research into management recommendations to increase the viability of the ranching industry while protecting rangeland ecosystems in California.


Sincerely,

Pelayo Alvarez
Conservation Program Director
Posted Jul 21, 2014 9:24 AM by Pelayo Alvarez
14
Siskiyou county is a rural area that is home to many farmers and ranchers. The retirement of Dan Drake has caused a void for many ranchers. It is not easy for them to find answers to questions that they could call Dan for in the past. The current staff at the extension office in Yreka is trying to fill the void or they redirect the calls but it's not the same has having a livestock advisor in the office.
Posted Jul 21, 2014 1:26 PM by Caroline Luiz
15
The Nature Conservancy's Shasta River Project would like to express our support for a Livestock and Natural Resources Advisor in Siskiyou County.

Water in the western U.S. has been the source of conflict for 100+ years and will likely continue to be controversial as population growth competes with agriculture and industry at the expense of natural resources. Add to this delicate balance the effect that climate change will have on freshwater supply and availability and the battle over water will only continue to escalate. While there isn't a silver bullet that can solve all the water issues in the West we can be smart and think strategically on how to strike that delicate balance between often competing uses.

The agricultural community in Siskiyou County has been working hard to find that balance between the water needs of our farms and ranches and the competing needs for water by the environment over 25+ years. Many of the low hanging fruit restoration projects have been completed. What is left are some of the harder more complex projects that require expertise in ensuring that the end product results in continued economic viability of our farms and ranches as well as recovery of our natural resources. Having a specialist locally who can advise on both livestock and natural resource management will be essential in ensuring long-term success of future projects. We strongly support the hiring of a Livestock Natural Resource Advisor in Siskiyou County.
Posted Jul 21, 2014 1:33 PM by Amy Campbell
16
The Scott River Water Trust, a local nonprofit dedicated to seeking a win-win water solution for ranchers & fish, supports having a strong technical person in the Livestock and Natural Resources Advisor position for UCCE-Siskiyou County. Research is needed on methods which will help ranchers develop livestock production systems that can be sustained under challenging water conditions. Technical outreach by the Advisor can demonstrate these improved methods. Since the Scott River stream system supports a large population of Chinook salmon as well as a significant portion of the state's coho salmon run (a threatened species), regulatory pressures on ranchers' water use are intense. Working with the excellent experience and reputation of Crop Advisor Steve Orloff, the new advisor will also have a superb opportunity to provide UCCE with a model for innovative resource management practices to share elsewhere in California.
Posted Jul 21, 2014 5:12 PM by Sari Sommarstrom

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