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ANR Employees

2016 Call for Positions

On December 14, 2016 UC ANR Vice President Humiston announced the the release of 26 CE positions from the 2016 call for a new round of hiring over the next two years. This new release continues the commitment for hiring to exceed projected turnover, thus achieving the goal of academic growth. And, as funding becomes available, UC ANR will consider additional positions.

2016 approved CE positions

January 12, 2016 solicited proposals for Cooperative Extension (CE) advisor and specialist positions in the ANR Update. The call identified positions for strengthening and expanding the UC ANR network to address programmatic gaps and emerging needs. Below this public webpage displays all 138 new CE position proposals (there is a search tool to assist in finding proposals).

The online submittal process was open from January 12 – May 5 (5:00 PM) to allow as much time as possible for internal consultation and external input from UC ANR stakeholders in all program areas. Submissions were accepted from the following official submitter groups:

The Review Phase was completed May 5 – August 1. All proposals were reviewed. The program area and unit reviews were conducted by the Program Teams; geographic groups of County/Multicounty Partnership and Research and Extension Center Directors, and the UC ANR affiliated colleges and school. These groups prioritized and provided rationale for the position proposals under their purview. This input was used to inform UC ANR Program Council’s recommendations and ultimately the UC ANR Vice President’s decisions. More information about the review process is available in the review orientation.

The public comment period was open Jan. 12 through July 11, 2016. Comments can be viewed by clicking the position links below. Comments were reviewed by the review groups, Program Council and the Vice President.

Relevant documents:

If you have any questions, contact Katherine Webb-Martinez at (510) 987-0029 or katherine.webb-martinez@ucop.edu.

 

2016 URS Call for Positions

This proposal has been formally submitted for the 2016 cycle.

Position Details

122 Ruminant Animal Nutrition & Behavior Specialist

This position will develop an applied research and extension program that discovers how to link ruminant animal nutrition and foraging behavior to conserve and enhance the provision of ecosystem services in California’s grasslands, shrublands and forested systems including managing fuel loads, biodiversity, soil carbon, invasive plants and sensitive wildlife habitat. This position also will identify how agricultural by-products can be incorporated into land management to optimize how grazing animals can benefit ecosystem function and how livestock producers can incorporate agricultural by-products from California’s diverse commodity-base to buffer effects of extensive drought, wildfire and land-use change on the availability of critical forage.

This position will create essential knowledge and provide urgently needed academic expertise to UCCE livestock and natural resource advisors throughout the state, the beef cattle, sheep and goat industries, as well as the array of conservation groups, land management agencies, fire safe councils, state and national agricultural agency leaders focused on protecting ecosystem function and using ruminants as tools to mitigate ongoing environmental change.

Proposed Location/Housing

Sierra Foothill Research and Extension Center

Proposed Area of Coverage

The position would be housed at the Sierra Foothill Research and Extension Center. Primary research and extension efforts would occur at the Center. The geographic focus would be statewide with other livestock and natural resource advisors and specialists. The issues defined in the project summary are relevant on a statewide bases. The position would offer research and extension opportunities across the state as well.

Contacts

Associated Documents

Comments

7 Comments

1
The Ruminant Animal Nutrition and Behavioral Specialist position would greatly benefit the Bear Yuba Land Trust. We own one working cattle ranch. We are striving to create a healthy ecosystem that uses ruminant animals to restore the landscape. Having a specialty position at SFREC that could assist us with best management practices would be hugely valuable.
Posted Jun 6, 2016 12:03 PM by Erin Tarr - Bear Yuba Land Trust
2
The Nevada County Resource Conservation District relies on the Sierra Foothill Research & Extention Center to conduct the necessary research regarding the environmental benefits of grazing with regard to fuel load reduction, wildfire issues in this heavily fire prone area, healthy forest land,conservation of habitat, management of invasive plant species and vegetation management needs in the sierra foothills. The research for these critical issues and the link between managed grazing and healthy ecosystems is essential in this historic 5th year of California's drought. We are an agricultural county and value the support and work done at the research center. We hope to have a continued partnership in the years ahead.
Posted Jun 6, 2016 2:12 PM by Jan Blake
3
As an owner of sheep and goats I have had the great good fortune to spend many hours with Fred Provenza talking about the ways ruminants interact with various ecosystems. His ability to connect various components of the larger biological systems have been very helpful in my work developing more functional grazing programs within conservation and cropping systems.
Over the years Glenn Nader and I have lamented that in California the UC Extension Service has not yet been able to fill a position with a person with similar discipline and philosophy as Fred. The effort to finally establish this position is greatly needed and appreciated.
The various systems in which I graze my animals are very complex, and the work to perfect various grazing strategies requires a broad knowledge of multiple disciplines. A person with the ability to link the various disciplines with both specific intensive core knowledge as well as extensive wisdom to grasp multiple disciplines is paramount to what we might achieve going forward. We need someone who can grasp and articulate the information as this area of animal husbandry continues to gain strength. The UC has an opportunity to participate in leading this effort if it will hire a person with these abilities.

Please regard my comments as very strong support for this much needed position!!!!
Posted Jun 7, 2016 8:08 AM by Leland Hazeltine
4
The Tahoe Cattlemen’s Association (“TCA”), through its Board of Directors, passed a motion on June 14th to strongly support this positon.

TCA believes that the Ruminant Animal Nutrition and Behavioral Specialist position would greatly benefit livestock producers in Placer and Nevada Counties. The research and education program would provide relevant information on ruminant nutrition; relating that information to grazing on range, shrub land, and forest lands; and using crop by-products as part of a nutrition program, especially during periods of drought.

The focus on animal behavior, supplementation strategies, grazing management, and the use of crop by-products will benefit cattle and all other livestock producers in the area and across the state.

Locating the position at the Sierra Research and Extension Center will allow access to resources and the ability to conduct cutting edge research and education in these areas.
Posted Jun 18, 2016 8:41 AM by Bob Moss, President
5
I have been involved with the SFREC for many years as a beef cattle producer, a former member of the Resource Advisory Committee and Animal Research Committee, and was one of the members who wrote the SFREC Strategic Plan. The University has and continues to make a significant investment in research conducted at the SFREC. The investment is to the benefit of the livestock industry as well as the success of research projects conducted at the SFREC and on Campus. Furthermore, the aforementioned Committee’s effectiveness is predicated on specific skill sets to make informed decisions on projects submitted to these Committee’s as well as the management of projects by the SFREC Staff. Animal Nutrition and Behavior are of paramount importance to managing livestock and insuring livestock heath and, thereby, optimizing the performance of livestock and research success at the SFREC. In addition, the Specialist position is especially significant as research requirements increase while operating budgets decline. I believe there is a quick Return on Investment with the placement of a Ruminant Animal Nutrition and Behavioral Specialist which would significantly leverage the Universities investment while expanding the academic footprint at SFREC.
Posted Jun 18, 2016 8:45 AM by Terry R. Jochim - Dusty Trail Ranch
6
I have enjoyed and benefited from interacting with livestock producers, extension specialists, and university professors in California. In this era of genome-molecular frontiers in biology and plant and animal agriculture, hiring people who can link genes with landscapes -- people and the animal and plant communities in our care -- through behavior is essential. I can think of nothing more valuable than developing an applied research and extension program that discovers how to link ruminant animal nutrition and foraging behavior to conserve and enhance the provision of ecosystem services in California’s grasslands, shrublands and forested systems including managing fuel loads, biodiversity, soil carbon, invasive plants and sensitive wildlife habitat. I think it essential as well to identify how agricultural by-products can be incorporated into land management to optimize how grazing animals can benefit ecosystem function and how livestock producers can incorporate agricultural by-products from California’s diverse commodity-base to buffer effects of extensive drought, wildfire and land-use change on the availability of critical forage. If I were a young man, I'd apply for the position and hope I could get it.
Posted Jul 1, 2016 10:47 AM by Fred Provenza
7
In the past, California ecological service grazers and have asked for expertise in secondary compounds and animal grazing behavior. As a UCCE Advisor, I filled the void in expertise by utilizing Utah State's Fred Provenza before he retired. The impact that he had was great. He also was the expertise for the UCCE "Vines and Ovines" project that was recognized for it's impact in the organic wine industry. This position could also have a great impact on grazing's ability to effectively impact wildfire in California by further addressing secondary compounds.

It will lead in development of the knowledge base that will revolutionize the use of grazing animals to shape ecological benefits for society.
Posted Jul 7, 2016 3:31 PM by Glenn Nader, Retired UCCE Livestock Advisor

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