ANR Employees
University of California
ANR Employees

2016 Call for Positions

On December 14, 2016 UC ANR Vice President Humiston announced the the release of 26 CE positions from the 2016 call for a new round of hiring over the next two years. This new release continues the commitment for hiring to exceed projected turnover, thus achieving the goal of academic growth. And, as funding becomes available, UC ANR will consider additional positions.

2016 approved CE positions

January 12, 2016 solicited proposals for Cooperative Extension (CE) advisor and specialist positions in the ANR Update. The call identified positions for strengthening and expanding the UC ANR network to address programmatic gaps and emerging needs. Below this public webpage displays all 138 new CE position proposals (there is a search tool to assist in finding proposals).

The online submittal process was open from January 12 – May 5 (5:00 PM) to allow as much time as possible for internal consultation and external input from UC ANR stakeholders in all program areas. Submissions were accepted from the following official submitter groups:

The Review Phase was completed May 5 – August 1. All proposals were reviewed. The program area and unit reviews were conducted by the Program Teams; geographic groups of County/Multicounty Partnership and Research and Extension Center Directors, and the UC ANR affiliated colleges and school. These groups prioritized and provided rationale for the position proposals under their purview. This input was used to inform UC ANR Program Council’s recommendations and ultimately the UC ANR Vice President’s decisions. More information about the review process is available in the review orientation.

The public comment period was open Jan. 12 through July 11, 2016. Comments can be viewed by clicking the position links below. Comments were reviewed by the review groups, Program Council and the Vice President.

Relevant documents:

If you have any questions, contact Katherine Webb-Martinez at (510) 987-0029 or katherine.webb-martinez@ucop.edu.

 

2016 URS Call for Positions

This proposal has been formally submitted for the 2016 cycle.

Position Details

130 Subtropical Fruit Crop IPM Specialist

This position will have statewide responsibilities in reducing the impact of arthropod pests in subtropical crops, and provide outreach to appropriate clientele to facilitate adoption of new science-based knowledge for integrated management of these pests. The citrus (300,000 acres, $2 billion, 24% of the nation’s crop) and avocado (60,000 acres, $400 million, 90% of the nation’s crop) industries are both facing severe disease threats. In the case of citrus, the Asian citrus psyllid vectors the bacterial disease huanglongbing and in avocados the polyphagous shot hole borer spreads a deadly fungus. An entomology specialist is need to research methods to control common pests, current threats, and new pests as they arrive as part of the integrated pest management program for these crops.

Proposed Location/Housing

Department of Entomology, UC Riverside or South Coast REC

Proposed Area of Coverage

Statewide

Contacts

Associated Documents

Comments

8 Comments

1
The Western Region IR-4 Program funded by USDA NIFA and based at UCD facilitates the registration of sustainable pest management technology for specialty crops and minor uses. We rely heavily on a collaborative effort among UC ANR CE Advisors and Specialists to help identify and prioritize needs and projects for growers in order to enhance their pest management capabilities. Enhanced expertise in subtropical fruit production and critical pests would support growers by providing input and guidance to the IR-4 program in the identification of appropriate registration projects for subtropical specialty crops grown in California.
Posted Jun 24, 2016 4:19 PM by Rebecca Sisco
2
As a PCA we depend on the expertise and sharing of information from the IPM Specialists. With the globlization of the markets, what follows is a wave of invasive species in our fields and orchards. It's been the IPM Specialists who trickle down the information, bring samples so we know what to look for, show us the damage to look for, and discovered the beneficial insects that attack those species. They help integrate pesticide trials, and have helped make our growing systems successful. We absolutely need their expertise.
Posted Jul 1, 2016 6:23 AM by Jane Delahoyde
3
The California Avocado Commission representing California’s 3,400 avocado growers, depends on the UC IPM program for sound science-based pest control information to help our industry remain competitive and sustainable. The Commission has a long history of supporting research with IPM specialists to address all of our industry’s pest issues ¬¬¬– from the well-established Persea mite and avocado thrips to new pests like shot hole borers and future pest threats such as seed weevils and avocado seed moth. Our industry is only aware of these potential pest threats through our ongoing cooperation with UC entomologists and specialists who are capable of identifying these pests and communicating their risk to our industry. The importance of this knowledge and the benefits it provides to our industry are incalculable. California’s commodities are under constant pressure from pests, disease, water supply and quality issues, and increasing foreign competition. Southern California’s subtropical fruit crops – primarily citrus and avocados – depend on the continued success of the UC IPM programs to remain viable so that we can continue to provide consumers with safe, wholesome California grown products.
Posted Jul 6, 2016 10:39 AM by Timothy Spann
4
As one of the states largest growers in the highly urbanized area of Irvine Calif area, we are highly dependent on the support of IPM specialists and their ability to coordinate efforts w/ the UC IPM programs. Our groves are often at the front lines of issues that range from exotic pest infestation to special interests groups demands for elimination of basic chemicals that are critical to the viability of our crops. The work that the IPM community does in cooperation w/ the UC systems, supports battle against the rouge pests and provides a reassuring voice to the neighboring community that our practices are safe, sound and necessary to maintain the crop viability. We strongly encourage the UC's support for this position.
Posted Jul 6, 2016 11:15 AM by Peter Changala
5
As one of the states largest growers Simpatica farms many different groves in four different counties of Southern California we are highly supportive of the IPM and encourage the UC's support for this position.
The California Avocado Commission representing California’s 3,400 avocado growers, depends on the UC IPM program for sound science-based pest control information to help our industry remain competitive and sustainable. The Commission has a long history of supporting research with IPM specialists to address all of our industry’s pest issues – from the well-established Persea mite and avocado thrips to new pests like shot hole borers and future pest threats such as seed weevils and avocado seed moth. Our industry is only aware of these potential pest threats through our ongoing cooperation with UC entomologists and specialists who are capable of identifying these pests and communicating their risk to our industry. The importance of this knowledge and the benefits it provides to our industry are incalculable. California’s commodities are under constant pressure from pests, disease, water supply and quality issues, and increasing foreign competition. Southern California’s subtropical fruit crops – primarily citrus and avocados – depend on the continued success of the UC IPM programs to remain viable so that we can continue to provide consumers with safe, wholesome California grown products.
Posted Jul 6, 2016 11:34 AM by Jamie Johnson
6
I am a grower of citrus and avocados in Southern California. We have learned from harsh experience that new invasive pests are an increasingly frequent problem for all subtropical crops in California and we are under constant pressure from pests that have spread into our growing regions in the past. Insects such as the Asian citrus psyllid and shot hole borers vector diseases that threaten our centuries old citrus and avocado industries. All of the groves that I work with have relied on IPM programs for many decades to responsibly and economically control arthropod pests. The PCA’s that walk our groves and the insectaries that raise and release beneficial predators and parasites for us have long depended on the UC IPM programs and expertise to help sustain our orchards. As a grower, I depend on information from UC entomologists and crop specialists to properly manage pest problems. I strongly support the proposed new Subtropical Fruit Crop Specialist position.
Posted Jul 7, 2016 3:59 PM by Ed McFadden
7
I am a grove manager responsible for 450 acres of Avocado and Lemons in the South coastal area of Orange County. I have also managed large groves and vineyards in Santa Maria, and Ventura, prior to my current assignment near San Juan Capistrano. In all of these locations I have worked closely with the Cooperative Extension Farm Advisors and Specialists, and continue to do so to this day. While the current subtropical extension staff does a yeoman's job in handling the day to day cultural and practical research issues with our crops, I feel that there has been a huge hole left with the retirement of Phil Phillips. As the the CE Entomology Specialist, Phil was a phone call away, advising us growers on controlling the infestations that had hit our coastal growing areas in my 27 years as a producer. Those included some not listed in Tim Spann's reply above. (Med Fly, LBAM, Leaf hopper, Mealy Bug, Pierces). This position was critical in working with not only the CE Crop specialists, but also with University personnel, crop protection industry representatives, and State and County regulatory personnel as we developed plans to deal with the infestation "de jour". What is different is that a subtropical specialist is innately more familiar with the Coastal production areas, which are unique to themselves, especially when it comes to registration and evaluation of products and tactics to use them. Today , I believe this position is more vital than ever , given the nuances of our crops grown on the coast, in an increasingly urbanized environment . Seeing the pest introductions are increasing in their frequency and virulence, it seems like an important position to fill, given that some of the recent introductions are fatal to our current crop mix. I know that this person's value and contributions will continue to be felt for many years to come. I urge you to consider filling this position as soon as possible.
Posted Jul 8, 2016 11:47 AM by Derek Knobel
8
On behalf of the 3,500 California citrus growers represented by the California Citrus Research Board, we would like to express our strong support for the proposed Subtropical Fruit Crop IPM Specialist. California citrus production is an almost $2 billion industry and commercial citrus acreage covers more than 270,000 acres from San Diego County to Butte County. This statewide position based at UC Riverside is urgently needed to address huanglongbing (HLB), a disease currently threatening the California citrus industry. HLB, a putative bacterial disease vectored by the Asian citrus psyllid (ACP), has crippled the Florida citrus industry, is making inroads in Texas and continues to be found in residential areas of Southern California. The establishment and filling of this position is of the highest priority for the California citrus industry.
The Citrus Research Program is the grower-funded and grower-directed program established in 1968 under the California Marketing Act and enables the state’s citrus producers to sponsor and support needed research. We provide over $7 million annually and support a range of topics from export issues to new variety development to horticultural best practices to disease mitigation. Over the past nine years our focus has increasingly centered on ACP and HLB. Since 2007 we have spent over $18 million to combat HLB including early detection, HLB management and ACP control. The California citrus industry urgently needs a subtropical fruit crop IPM specialist to coordinate research and extension efforts against ACP and other invasive pests. UC Riverside has a long history of supporting the citrus industry, has a number of excellent researchers and Cooperative Extension agents working on citrus and is located near the center of the current ACP infestation in California. The California Citrus Research Board strongly supports the establishment and filling of this position.
Posted Jul 11, 2016 8:45 AM by Gary Schulz

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