ANR Employees
University of California
ANR Employees

2016 Call for Positions

On December 14, 2016 UC ANR Vice President Humiston announced the the release of 26 CE positions from the 2016 call for a new round of hiring over the next two years. This new release continues the commitment for hiring to exceed projected turnover, thus achieving the goal of academic growth. And, as funding becomes available, UC ANR will consider additional positions.

2016 approved CE positions

January 12, 2016 solicited proposals for Cooperative Extension (CE) advisor and specialist positions in the ANR Update. The call identified positions for strengthening and expanding the UC ANR network to address programmatic gaps and emerging needs. Below this public webpage displays all 138 new CE position proposals (there is a search tool to assist in finding proposals).

The online submittal process was open from January 12 – May 5 (5:00 PM) to allow as much time as possible for internal consultation and external input from UC ANR stakeholders in all program areas. Submissions were accepted from the following official submitter groups:

The Review Phase was completed May 5 – August 1. All proposals were reviewed. The program area and unit reviews were conducted by the Program Teams; geographic groups of County/Multicounty Partnership and Research and Extension Center Directors, and the UC ANR affiliated colleges and school. These groups prioritized and provided rationale for the position proposals under their purview. This input was used to inform UC ANR Program Council’s recommendations and ultimately the UC ANR Vice President’s decisions. More information about the review process is available in the review orientation.

The public comment period was open Jan. 12 through July 11, 2016. Comments can be viewed by clicking the position links below. Comments were reviewed by the review groups, Program Council and the Vice President.

Relevant documents:

If you have any questions, contact Katherine Webb-Martinez at (510) 987-0029 or katherine.webb-martinez@ucop.edu.

 

2016 URS Call for Positions

This proposal has been formally submitted for the 2016 cycle.

Position Details

092 Environmental Engineering Specialist

California leads the nation in agricultural production, but along with the enormous economic benefit from agricultural and food products comes a tremendous amount of animal and food waste and agricultural residues that impose significant environmental impact. There is an urgent need for an extension engineer to provide technical assistance and education to farmers, stakeholders and agri-businesses on the selection and adoption of various waste treatment and conversion technologies. This CE Specialist position will facilitate effective management and utilization of animal, food and agricultural waste as energy, nutrient and water resources while reducing environmental impacts and improving overall environmental quality in agriculture and the food system.

Proposed Location/Housing

Department of Biological and Agricultural Engineering, UC Davis

Proposed Area of Coverage

Statewide

Contacts

Associated Documents

Comments

13 Comments

1
Waste and agricultural residues are byproducts of our technological advances that we have the responsibility to address. Education and technical assistance on exploring water treatment and conversion technology options are much needed.
Posted Jun 23, 2016 5:15 PM by Mike Chan
2
An average of 40% of cereals, roots, tubers, oilseeds, fruits, and vegetables are loss or wrongfully wasted in The United States, including California. It is unfortunate, as one tenth of energy, half of land, and four-fifths of water in the United States is used for getting food to consumers, but nearly half of food is lost or wasted. It is extremely important to support this position, to evaluate hot to significantly reduce and reutilize this loss.
Posted Jun 28, 2016 10:51 AM by Irwin R Donis-Gonzalez
3
I work extensively with biomass energy and some of the state's most important potential bioenergy resources are agricultural wastes. The use of these wastes for energy and bio-products are important state policy objectives, and are increasingly supported by state and federal programs that stimulate investment in engineered systems to that create low carbon intensity energy in diverse forms. An engineering focused specialist's position would be greatly valued in the state and the person chosen would provide important support for the state's transition to a low carbon economy. New bioenergy facilities will be important in providing high quality jobs, especially in rural areas with underserved populations. this is a high priority position.
Posted Jul 6, 2016 10:59 AM by Stephen Kaffka
4
California has adopted Assembly Bill 1826 -- landmark legislation that requires organic waste to be separated and diverted from landfills in stages that began in April 2016 and include all commercial organics by 2020. Technologies have been developed to process and convert this vast amount of waste to valuable Bioenergy and soil amendments. However, it will take a great deal of education, innovation, and collaboration to develop infrastructure required. This position will provide valuable support for the key stakeholders involved in planning for and developing the facilities, as well as understanding and developing markets for the end products.
Posted Jul 6, 2016 11:35 PM by Michele Wong
5
California is both the nation’s most populated- and leading agricultural state, and while often an advantage, the rural urban interface causes friction. As an air quality specialist, I often see that agricultural waste streams (e.g., manure, by-products etc.) are simply stored rather than treated and used, and turn into nuisances or pollutants that impede to our state’s ecosystems. An environmental Engineering Specialist housed at BAE would be uniquely positioned to address the urgent need of many of our agricultural commodities as well as those from nearby communities to turn unwanted waste streams into commodities (such as power, heat, gas etc.).
I cannot think of a more timely position than the one proposed here. This clearly is an area where California could assume a leadership role nationally and globally due to our unique combination of Ag, the state’s human population, and our University’s preeminence in sustainability science connecting these groups. I fully support the position of Environmental Engineering Specialist.
Posted Jul 8, 2016 9:40 AM by Frank Mitloehner
6
I strongly support the creation of the position of CE Specialist Environmental Engineering. This position is needed for a critical two-way flow of knowledge and technology and feedback from researchers and academics to farmers and end-users on the responsible and sustainable management of agriculture resources particularly the waste products. Biomass from crop production and processing and from animal facilities such as dairies has a large potential to contribute to the state’s renewable energy goals but if not managed well, these biomass could be detrimental to the environment, too. In my view, this Specialist position can help ensure that the latest and most appropriate agriculture waste conversion and management technologies and strategies are made known to farmers, stakeholders and agri-businesses and that the feedback or lessons learned are conveyed back to technology developers.
Posted Jul 9, 2016 11:34 AM by Rizaldo Aldas
7
I strongly support the creation of the position of CE Specialist Environmental Engineering. This position is needed for a critical two-way flow of knowledge and technology and feedback from researchers and academics to farmers and end-users on the responsible and sustainable management of agriculture resources particularly the waste products. Biomass from crop production and processing and from animal facilities such as dairies has a large potential to contribute to the state’s renewable energy goals but if not managed well, these biomass could be detrimental to the environment, too. In my view, this Specialist position can help ensure that the latest and most appropriate agriculture waste conversion and management technologies and strategies are made known to farmers, stakeholders and agri-businesses and that the feedback or lessons learned are conveyed back to technology developers.

Posted Jul 11, 2016 12:01 AM by Ghasem Edalati
8
I believe this is a very high priority position needed to ensure CA can continue to grow as leader in both production and sustainability.
Posted Jul 11, 2016 1:23 AM by Steve Zicari
9
As the Director of Renewable Resource Programs for the California Association of Sanitation Agencies, I applaud filling this position. The wastewater sector can help the state achieve its many climate change mitigation objectives and we look forward to working with the successful candidate for this position toward those goals. Collaboration with the UC and UC Extension system is vital to ensure robust markets and management for biosolids as well as other organic residuals. Increasingly food waste and other organics will be co-digested at wastewater plants which will divert them from landfills, increase renewable energy production, and increase the quantity of biosolids to be recycled. With landfills (including ADC use) likely to disappear as a biosolids management option it is imperative that the many benefits of biosolids use on agricultural soil is understood and articulated by Extension and other University partners. This position will allow that understanding and dialogue to be a priority. Biosolids are key to ensuring healthy soils for California farmers by improving soil tillth, increasing crop yields, increasing soil organic matter and sequestering carbon long term, reducing the need for fossil fuel intense inorganic fertilizer, and reducing the need for irrigation due to their high water holding capacity. Please contact me with any questions and best of luck in pursuing this highly needed position.
Posted Jul 11, 2016 2:20 PM by Greg Kester
10
The more that "wastes" such as manure and spoilage are treated as byproducts, the better we can manage these complex systems.
Posted Jul 11, 2016 3:32 PM by Carolyn M Jones
11
The California Tree Nut Research & Extension Planning Group, representing the almond, pistachio and walnut industries (combined 2015 acreage exceeding 1.7 million acres) regards this position as written as a medium priority.

Certainly as noted in the position description, “the effective management and utilization of animal, food and agricultural waste as energy, nutrient and water resources while reducing the impact on environmental quality” is a high priority for California agriculture. However, as noted, the specialist will work with animal waste as the primary target biomass resource. Working with (woody) crop residues and co-products is a secondary target, hence our medium priority ranking.
Posted Jul 11, 2016 5:01 PM by Bob Curtis, Almond Board of California and the CA Tree Nut Research & Extension Planning Group
12
California has adopted Assembly Bill 1826 -- landmark legislation that requires organic waste to be separated and diverted from landfills in stages that began in April 2016 and include all commercial organics by 2020. Technologies have been developed to process and convert this vast amount of waste to valuable Bioenergy and soil amendments. However, it will take a great deal of education, innovation, and collaboration to develop infrastructure required. This position will provide valuable support for the key stakeholders involved in planning for and developing the facilities, as well as understanding and developing markets for the end products.
Posted Jul 11, 2016 8:42 PM by Michele Wong
13
As one who has worked extensively with dairy manure issues in California for decades, I cannot emphasize enough how integral engineering is to support the agronomic aspects of nutrient management on dairies. The practical details are innumerable: solids separation, liquid manure transport through pipelines, sludge removal from ponds, application measurement and control, real-time monitoring of concentrations, dewatering and of-site transport of solids...all of these require engineered solutions which in most cases do not yet exist or need evaluation. Nutrient management plans that meet the agronomic needs of the crop often cannot be implanted because of the physical limitations of the manure handling and transport system.
I strongly support this position which would fill a critical gap in UC ANR’s ability to assist the dairy industry and other solid and liquid waste generators to protect both groundwater and air quality in California.
Posted Jul 11, 2016 9:01 PM by Marsha Campbell, UCCE Farm Advisor Stanisluas County

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