ANR Employees
University of California
ANR Employees

2016 Call for Positions

On December 14, 2016 UC ANR Vice President Humiston announced the the release of 26 CE positions from the 2016 call for a new round of hiring over the next two years. This new release continues the commitment for hiring to exceed projected turnover, thus achieving the goal of academic growth. And, as funding becomes available, UC ANR will consider additional positions.

2016 approved CE positions

January 12, 2016 solicited proposals for Cooperative Extension (CE) advisor and specialist positions in the ANR Update. The call identified positions for strengthening and expanding the UC ANR network to address programmatic gaps and emerging needs. Below this public webpage displays all 138 new CE position proposals (there is a search tool to assist in finding proposals).

The online submittal process was open from January 12 – May 5 (5:00 PM) to allow as much time as possible for internal consultation and external input from UC ANR stakeholders in all program areas. Submissions were accepted from the following official submitter groups:

The Review Phase was completed May 5 – August 1. All proposals were reviewed. The program area and unit reviews were conducted by the Program Teams; geographic groups of County/Multicounty Partnership and Research and Extension Center Directors, and the UC ANR affiliated colleges and school. These groups prioritized and provided rationale for the position proposals under their purview. This input was used to inform UC ANR Program Council’s recommendations and ultimately the UC ANR Vice President’s decisions. More information about the review process is available in the review orientation.

The public comment period was open Jan. 12 through July 11, 2016. Comments can be viewed by clicking the position links below. Comments were reviewed by the review groups, Program Council and the Vice President.

Relevant documents:

If you have any questions, contact Katherine Webb-Martinez at (510) 987-0029 or katherine.webb-martinez@ucop.edu.

 

2016 URS Call for Positions

This proposal has been formally submitted for the 2016 cycle.

Position Details

124 Small Farm Economics Specialist

Proposed Location/Housing

Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics, UC Davis

Proposed Area of Coverage

Statewide

Contacts

Associated Documents

Comments

10 Comments

1
Success of a small farm operation is dependent on many things both in control and out of control of the farmer. One thing they do have control over is the economics of the business they are involved with and so often it is overlooked. It is often viewed as less exciting than the actual production or marketing of the product, but is often the most important aspect of success or failure. This is a position that will cover all parts of the State and will have a great responsibility.
Posted Jun 21, 2016 12:59 PM by Ben Faber
2
As Director of Food and Farming Programs at the Ecology Center,I would appreciate the opportunity to collaborate with a UC Small Farm Economics Extension Specialist on research and outreach programs. The farmers that we work face numerous challenges regarding understanding and complying with new food safety regulations, balancing their time between production and marketing activities, and finding viable marketing outlets.

The Ecology Center would like to work with this Specialist to analyze the impact of new farmers markets on the sales of existing ones, in order to develop some economic guidelines for the opening of markets to preserve income for farmers at existing markets.

We are particularly interested in working with this Specialist to determine how and what structures can be developed to expand smaller producers access to regional grocers and foodservice chains. Our smaller-scale farmers need additional market outlets within our region.

Our organization would like to work with this Specialist to determine if beginning, immigrant and other historically disadvantaged farmer populations are aware of the requirements to participate in farmers' markets.

Our organization has worked closely with the UC Small Farm Program in the past and strongly support their efforts.
Posted Jul 6, 2016 11:15 AM by Ben Feldman
3
CCOF (California Certified Organic Farmers) strongly supports proposed funding for a University of California (UC) Small Farm Economics Extension Specialist position.

CCOF is the largest organic certifier in the United States. Founded in 1973, our mission is to advance organic agriculture for a healthy world through organic certification, education, advocacy, and promotion. CCOF is based in Santa Cruz, California, and represents more than 3,000 organic producers in 42 states and three countries. The vast majority of these operations are small farms in California.

Small organic farms in California face unique economic challenges and opportunities. In addition to facing the challenges that face all farmers – high land costs, water and labor shortages, extreme weather events, and pest prevention, among others – organic producers are challenged to identify or transition affordable organic land, are limited in the tools available to them to manage pests, and ironically, struggle to meet strong consumer demand for organic products.

California’s agricultural economy and small organic farmers in particular will be well served by a UC Small Farm Economics Extension Specialist.

CCOF welcomes the opportunity to collaborate with the UC Small Farm Economics Extension Specialist to support small farmers and to help scale up organic production in the state to meet consumer demand.

We sincerely hope that the UC Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources will identify funding for this position so as to help meet the potential of this important sector of the agricultural economy.
Posted Jul 8, 2016 2:07 PM by Cathy Calfo
4


I am writing is support of the proposed position for a University of California Small Farm extension specialist focused on Small Farm Economics and the outreach and research programs that are needed by the small farm sector of California’s agriculture sector. As a Mid sized Organic Farmer here at Full Belly Farm in Yolo County- who started as a small farmer, I see a compelling need to support the many beginning farmers that are re-populating and stimulating the economies of rural California. These farmers are beginning the uphill climb to establish enterprises and require focused research on the tools and strategies to help them succeed. Their presence in the farming sector is positive and welcomed addition to an aging, concentrating farmer population.

It is clear that the mission of the UC ANR should be aimed at supporting all farmers—and like specialized sectors of the industry, research is often focused on solving the problems – whether it is oranges or almonds, weeds or fertility, research is often directed to areas that help a sector prosper- with direct benefits to the non farm public. Small farms have different sets of marketing needs, technological needs, aggregation needs, cultural needs for growing at a smaller scale, mixed crop marketing and production help, and strategies for market access that aren’t the same as the needs of well established growers.

While technologies and techniques are often adaptable at different scales, much of the local food movement that small farmers support has arisen without a great deal of investment on the part of UC. The momentum for this new awareness has been the work of many small and organic farmers who market locally and have become the face of agriculture. There is no doubt that this segment would have grown even more quickly had it been wholeheartedly supported and promoted by the UC system.

There are many challenges with regulations, scaling up, food safety, employment filings and compliance, and certification that can simply overwhelm these small-scale and beginning enterprises before they get started…. They need help to find efficient ways to meet these regulations and survive in an increasingly inaccessible marketplace. They need help.

We hope that UC ASNR fully funds this position and gives it the support it needs to succeed. With UC Davis having a world class Food and Wine presence, it is
an oversight to not support all scales of farm enterprises- and create a economic models for all scales of agriculture to succeed internationally.
Posted Jul 8, 2016 4:10 PM by Paul Muller
5
I have worked for over 20 years with small farmers & artisan food producers, rural economic developers, public health, food & farm policy officials at the local, state & national level. In the 1990s, I founded Ag Innovations Network to develop marketing programs in rural communities in California & Australia to sustain small producers. I founded Slow Food Russian River in 1996 to promote small producers & was Chairman of Slow Food USA & a member of the Slow Food International Board from 2000-07. For the last ten years I have led Roots of Change, organizing & advocating to develop more a resilient, diverse & healthy food systems. In these years I led the efforts to found the CA Food Policy Council, the CA Market Match Consortium & the CA Policy Work Group, which tracks CA's food & farm legislation. All of my work has focused on the nexus between small producer economics, environmental stewardship, public health & social justice. They are all connected. Therefore, I can think of no more important addition to the Small Farm Program than a specialist in small farm economics. CA must devise a strategy for leveraging consumer interest in local food to foster more viable small farms throughout the state. We must integrate small farms into local economies using public purchasing, community food projects, nutrition enhancement, community investment in farmers markets & processing infrastructures & more. Having worked with data from the Small Farm Program this year to win $5 million from the State General Fund for nutrition incentives at farmers markets, farm stands and CSAs, I know how important economic arguments are to policymakers. More good data will build momentum for change. Roots of Change is eager to continue our cooperation with the Small Farm Program. We fervently hope that you will approve the proposed position & empower communities to build healthy & resilient agricultural economies that will provide jobs in those communities that most need them. Thank you!
Posted Jul 11, 2016 11:01 AM by Michael R. Dimock
6
As the Executive Director of Sustainable Economic Enterprises of Los Angeles, I would appreciate the opportunity to collaborate with a UC Small Farm Economics Extension Specialist on research and outreach programs. The local farmers that we work with face numerous challenges regarding production costs, new food safety regulations, and other marketing difficulties. Our Farmers Market Organization would like to work with this Specialist to analyze the impact of new farmers markets on the sales of existing ones, in order to develop some economic guidelines for the opening of markets to preserve income for farmers at existing markets. We are also interested in working with this Specialist to determine how and what structures can be developed to expand smaller producers access to other economic opportunities in our area. Our organization relies extensively on grant funding. Finally, we are interested in including this Specialist in some of our grant proposals, because funding agencies like USDA-NIFA require economic analysis of project impacts on many projects.
Posted Jul 11, 2016 11:13 AM by James Haydu
7
The work of farming is hard and our state's small farmers face multiple challenges adapting to changing regulatory requirements and market conditions. This proposed position is essential to helping small-scale farmers achieve success, profitability and sustainabilty.

Our Farmers Market Association would like to work with this Specialist to analyze the impact of new food retail sites - both farmers markets and traditional brick-and-mortar retailers - on the sales at existing farmers' markets. Over time, we would like to work with this Specialist to develop some economic guidelines for the opening of markets and to asseess the viability of existing markets.

We recognize that farmers' markets are not the only outlet for small farms and we want to help our state's small scale farmers to be successful overall, not just when they are selling in a farmers' market. This position can help small farmers to identify ways to sell their product to regional grocers and foodservice chains or to pool their resources with other small farmers to increase their ability to serve larger institutional clients.

While PCFMA does not rely upon significant grant funding for its operations, we have competed successfully for federal and state grants that have increased our ability to serve the farmers who sell in our markets. We are interested in including this Specialist in some of our grant proposals to provide an independent economic analysis of our project impacts on our farmers and to help us make the case for the positive impact additional training and outreach projects can have upon our state's small farm sector.

We hope that UC ASNR fully funds this position and gives it the support it needs to succeed.

Thank you for your consideration.

Allen J. Moy
Executive Director
Pacific Coast Farmers' Market Association
Posted Jul 11, 2016 11:39 AM by Allen Moy
8
The creation of a Small Farm Economist would be extremely useful for small farmers and ranchers across the state and provide valuable expertise and knowledge to greatly benefit the agricultural industry. As the director of the North Coast Growers' Association, a rural farmers' market organization, I have worked with many farmers over the past nine years to better develop their business plans, marketing and production plans. This specialist position would provide the type of assistance our farmers need.

Small farms are the majority in California, yet few resources specifically for small farms exist. Many rely on non-profit community based organizations for assistance, and while we can offer a lot of support and resources, an economist specializing in the small farms with the resources of the UC ASNR would be critically valuable. Our smal farmers and ranchers would see significant and measurable economic benefit from the creation of this position, and our organization would gladly work in collaboration with the specialist to help connect that person to our farmers.

Thank you for your time and consideration of this important position.
Posted Jul 11, 2016 1:11 PM by Portia Bramble
9
I have worked in the Certified Farmers Market industry both in California and nationally for 37 years. Without well rounded and well trained small farmers, certified farmers market would not be thriving and growing. The new California consumer is very interested in buying from small farmers. California small farmers need a specialist in their area. That is why I am writing is support of the proposed position for a University of California Small Farm extension specialist focused on Small Farm Economics and the outreach and research programs that are needed by the small farm sector of California’s agriculture sector. I definitely see a need to support the many beginning farmers that are thankfully re-populating and stimulating the economies of rural California. New farming academies are attracting the next wave of small scale agriculturalists and these farmers will particularly benefit from this specialist. These farmers are beginning the uphill climb to establish enterprises and require focused research on the tools and strategies to help them succeed.

I agree with many in that It is clear that the mission of the UC ANR should be aimed at supporting all farmers. Small farms have different sets of marketing needs, technological needs, aggregation needs, cultural needs for growing at a smaller scale, mixed crop marketing and production help, and strategies for market access that aren’t the same as the needs of well established growers. I have served on the UC small farm advisory committee strongly support this position.
Posted Jul 11, 2016 2:26 PM by Randii MacNear
10
As Executive Director of Sonoma County Farm Trails, I would appreciate the opportunity to collaborate with a UC Small Farm Economics Extension Specialist on research and outreach programs. The 100+ farmers and producers that we work with face numerous challenges regarding understanding and complying with new food safety regulations, balancing their time between production and marketing activities, understanding their costs of production, evaluating the trade-offs of marketing in different channels, etc.

Our organization has worked closely with the UC Small Farm Program to strengthen our members’ agritourism activities to diversify their market outlets, as well as to educate the urban population about agriculture. In the face of considerable regulatory challenges related to permitting, zoning, and food safety, we would appreciate the opportunity to work with this Specialist to measure the costs for our members to comply with such regulations.

We are particularly interested in working with this Specialist to determine how and what structures can be developed to expand smaller producer access to additional market outlets within our region.

We need more information and metrics regarding the impact of small-scale farms on the local economy. They are an integral part of our food system and need more support in order to thrive so we may keep diversified agriculture in Sonoma County in perpetuity.

Respectfully,
Carmen Snyder
ED, Sonoma County Farm Trails
Posted Jul 11, 2016 7:08 PM by Carmen Snyder

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