LANDSCAPE LUSH
LANDSCAPE LUSH
LANDSCAPE LUSH
University of California
LANDSCAPE LUSH

Principles of IPM

5 Program Components

1. PREVENTION
This is the most important component of IPM.  Careful landscape design, plant selection, site preparation, proper planting, careful irrigation, and recommended cultural practices (maintenance pruning, fertilization, etc.) go a long way to avoiding pest problems.

2. CORRECT PEST OR SYMPTOM IDENTIFICATION
Proper ID of pests or diseases is critical to appropriate control.  Many symptoms of pest, disease, and environmental damage look superficially similar, and can easily be mistaken for one another.  Careful observations must be made of the environmental history of the plant and of the plant condition as a whole.  Samples may need to be taken of the tree tissues, soil, or suspected pests.  Consult with the UCANR Publications at the right, or contact your local Cooperative Extension or Agricultural Commissioner's office if you need assistance.

3. REGULAR SURVEYING FOR PESTS
Systematic monitoring will alert you to changes in plant conditions and pest populations in a timely manner that will allow appropriate responses.  Record keeping can be useful for noticing changes over time.  Monitoring forms are available in Pests of Landscape Trees and Shrubs, a UC publication available for purchase through the link at the right.

4. DEVELOP ACTION THRESHOLDS
Some pest damage may be acceptable, and not affect the overall health of plants.  Determine what the acceptable levels are for your conditions and clientele before deciding on a course of action.  Timing of both herbicides and pesticides is a critical part of effective use, so deciding what thresholds are before they are reached improves the efficiency of your control program.

5. APPLY APPROPRIATE MANAGEMENT
The least toxic methods of control should always be considered first, such as biological (pathogens, predators or parasites), or mechanical control (hoeing, string trimming, copper bands). Cultural practices that need to be altered to mitigate the issue should be incorporated into the management strategy, including canopy thinning to increase light, correcting irrigation, and mulching to suppress weeds and root diseases.  Finally, when chemicals are necessary, they should be used with the utmost caution by a qualified applicator according to label directions.

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