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User Manual - Academics with ANR M+P

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User Manual Academics with ANR Merit + Promotion

     Introduction (and tips for getting started)
     Annual Reporting Checklists
     Themes
            Naming your theme
            Describing the background, methods, outcomes/impact
                   Condition changes and outcome types
                   Instructions and resources for outcomes/impacts
            Privacy / UC Delivers for public posting
     Projects
     Tags
     Collaborators
     Activities
             Definitions, tips, and description of how activity information is used
     Explore What's Happening in Cooperative Extension
     Academic Program Review
            E-Book links
     Civil Rights Compliance
            Background (revised demographic categories)
            Establishing baseline - Instructions for race and ethnicity
            Collecting Extension Activity participants race and ethnicity
            Aggregating and reporting Extension Activity contacts' race and ethnicity
            Statewide Programs instructions
            County Director/Supervisor roles
            Example: Advisor baseline story

     Full Time Equivalent (FTE) Reporting
     Organizational Reporting
            How Program Planning and Evaluation uses Project Board information
            Data elements
     Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

 

Introduction

Project Board is a new set of systems that integrates and streamlines academic merit & promotion processes and organizational reporting. It enables academics  to:

a) record information for their academic program reviews (program summary "theme" narratives, projects, activities)

b) document compliance with civil rights compliance (clientele groups, clientele contacts, all reasonable efforts)

c) meet annual ANR reporting requirements (federal reporting, UC reporting, other accountability and advocacy efforts)

d) search less-sensitive data (project and activity tables) to find collaborators in the ANR network

 

USING THE SYSTEM

General information that may help you use Project Board better:

  • You move to the different screens by clicking on the blue links in the top menu.
  • If you enter or change data, remember to click the Save button before you leave the page.
  • For narrative sections, you can cut and paste from word processing applications into the text boxes.
  • Hover over the “i” icons to get more information, definitions, and tips.

 

GETTING HELP

You can come back to Project Board Help at any time by clicking the Help button that appears at the top right drop down menu.

If you need further assistance, please contact the Program Planning and Evaluation Office in Oakland: Chris Hanson at christopher.hanson@ucop.edu or at (510)987-0628 or Kit Alviz at kit.alviz@ucop.edu or at (510)987-0027.

 

LOGGING IN

  1. Open Firefox or Chrome (NOT Internet Explorer. Safari and Edge may be hit or miss.)
  2. Go to ANR Portal (www.ucanr.edu/portal) and log in. Trouble logging in to ANR Portal? Email help@ucanr.edu.
  3. You will see a Project Board widget on the right-hand side of your portal. Click on the link to log in. If you don't see the widget, email christopher.hanson@ucop.edu.

 

GETTING STARTED

Step 1 - Create clientele groups

If you are creating clientele groups for the first time, please watch Defining Clientele and Affirmative Action Planning – Oct. 13, 2020 training recording, PowerPoint, and Choose your own adventure examples as well as the Civil Rights Compliance instructions.

If you had clientele groups in the CASA system, they have been imported into Project Board and mapped into the new demographic categories. Consider making the following revisions to your clientele groups:

  • Add county or statewide associations to each clientele group (see 3rd data field). This will help ANR with future mapping efforts.
  • There is a new federally-defined category for race: "Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander." Consider modifying your clientele group baseline to address this change.
  • Consider lumping clientele groups as appropriate for more efficient reporting (and more efficient analysis by Affirmative Action).
    • Lump similar clientele groups into a multi-county clientele group. Example: "Pest Control Advisors in County A" and "Pest Control Advisors in County B" can be lumped and renamed as "Pest Control Advisors in Counties A and B."
    • You can also lump similar clientele groups into a broader clientele group. Example: "Strawberry Growers County A" and "Small Farms County A" into "Strawberry and Small Farms in County A."
    • Note that you cannot combine clientele groups of different types, such as combining individuals and organizations.
    • If you are concerned that the demographic makeup across clientele groups is too different to lump, you may leave the clientele groups separated.
  • Archive clientele groups that you no longer use. All clientele groups will be analyzed for civil rights compliance.
  • Update your clientele group baseline if you know that the demographic makeup of the populations you serve has changed (i.e., if you notice or hear from other sources that there have been increases or decreases in the racial/ethnic makeup of population served).
  • Archive/Do not create any Project Board clientele groups that are internal to clientele (e.g., ANR academics, staff, statewide program volunteers). Demographic information of these groups are already captured elsewhere.
  • Statewide Program instructions: You do not need to report contacts against clientele groups that are already reported in other statewide program systems (4hOnline, PEARS, WEBNEERS, VMS) if you or your staff/volunteers are already reporting these audiences in another system. Parity analysis will be conducted at the county level for these programs and provided on an annual basis. This means that you do not need to keep baseline up to date; instead, write in the source notes and compliance notes that baseline and contacts are provided to ANR Affirmative Action by the statewide office. 
    • Exception: Project Board is the only place to report All Reasonable Effort (A.R.E.) for statewide programs. When creating A.R.E. activities, assign them to the clientele group that is the intended audience. Remember to report both your and your staff/volunteer A.R.E. efforts and qualitative describe the method.

Step 2 - Begin entering your themes, projects, activities, and contacts

Project Board is a dynamic system that allows you to enter information at any stage at any time. Three possible workflows are listed below, in order from most to least efficient. Keeps scrolling down for technical instructions and definitions for themes, projects, and activiites.

Workflow 1: Themes --> Projects --> Activities

  • Consider this flow if your themes and projects have already been defined and are not anticipated to have major changes.
  • How: First create all of your theme names. Second, create all of your project names and link each project to a theme. Note you can fill in theme/project narratives fields later! Then when you create activities, the theme/project names will be available for selection.
  • Benefits: The most efficient workflow in Project Board as you will have less clicking and cleanup to do at the end of the year. User testing indicated this is the most recommended workflow.

Workflow 2: Projects --> Activities --> Themes

  • Consider this flow if your projects are defined but don't yet know or like to review all of your activities/projects before determining your themes.
  • How: First create all of your project names. Then when you create activities, the project names will be available for selection. Before final submission, you will have to review and link projects (and any activities not belonging to a project) to a theme.
  • Benefits: An efficient workflow in Project Board during the year, but will require some clicking and cleanup to do at the end of the year. You can also utilize this workflow as a reflective practice!

Workflow 3: Activities --> Themes --> Projects

  • Consider this workflow if you have no idea what your project or theme names will be and/or prefer to thoroughly review/reflect on activities at the end of each review year.
  • How: Create all of your activities first. Then create a theme. Create projects last and link them to a theme. Before final submission/downloading your dossier, you will have to review and link all activities to a project or theme. 
  • Benefits: Good option for people new to ANR and want to review their activities at the end of the year to determine themes. This is the least efficient workflow in Project Board and will require a lot of clicking and reviewing before final submission.

Step 3 - Complete your annual reporting checklist by February 1st each year.

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Annual Reporting Checklists

5 Must-Do's by February 1st every year! These checklists are hosted on Google Drive; you might have to log in to my.ucdavis.edu or any google account to access.

4-H Youth Development Academics Checklist

Nutrition, Family, and Consumer Science Academics Checklist

Checklist for all other academics (Agriculture, Natural Resources, Pest Management, Environmental Horticulture, etc.) not with Nutrition and Youth Development Statewide Programs

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Themes

Technical instructions:

  • Click on the Themes link in the top menu of Project Board
  • Click on the blue Add Theme button.
  • Follow the onscreen instructions (hover over the “i” for even more help!) to complete each item in bold below.
  • To edit an existing theme, click on the Themes link in the top menu of Project Board, then click on the field of the theme which you would like to edit.

Naming your theme

Subject matter around which the program is organized and for which goals are created (source: E-Book).

Tip: Although not required, you may use existing ANR terms such as Strategic Initiatives, Program Team names, Public Values, Condition Changes, etc. You are welcome to develop your own.

Describing the background, methods, outcomes/impacts

Consider including the following components when describing your theme:

  • Clientele: People or groups of people that a program aims to serve.
  • Goals: The purpose toward which an effort is directed.
  • Inputs: What is invested? Faculty, staff, students, infrastructure, federal, state, and private funds, time, knowledge, etc.

Articulate ‘Methods,’ ‘Outcomes’ and ‘Impacts’ that were achieved during this reporting year. If preferred, you can create program/project sub-headings.

Below is guidance adapted from the E-Book (updated 2021) that is also relevant for Project Board annual reporting:

  • Evidence of impact (or anticipated impact), may be demonstrated through empirical data collected by the academic, workgroup projects, and/or inferred impact as shown through reasonable inferences from scholarly literature. Evidence of behavior change outcomes may be indicators of potential/anticipated impacts. For more how-to information and examples, see the ANR tip sheet: Condition Changes – How Do I Measure Them?
  • Outcomes measured/observed during this review period that are the result of activities from past review periods may be included.

Consider including the following components when describing your theme:

  • Methods (Activities/Outputs): Research/creative and extension activities to reach goals. Products created through such activities (meetings, trainings, extension programs, curricula, webinars, publications, etc.).
  • Outcomes/Impacts (include number of people, acres, and other units affected when possible):
    • Change in learning measured (knowledge, attitude, or skills)
    • Change in action measured (behavior or practice)
    • Change in policy or decision-making measured (science-based information applied to decision- making or results from policy engagement)
    • Change or potential change in condition (social/health, economic, environmental, or physical)
  • Articulate the method to which an outcome/impact relates, otherwise it can be confusing for reviewers to match up outcomes/impacts with methods.
  • If the method occurred during the review period, you can reference your Activities section. If the method occurred in a previous review period, briefly describe it, and then describe the outcomes/impacts achieved or measured during the review period.

If possible, select at least one anticipated condition change and one measured outcome type from the lists provided.

  • Condition changes represent broad environmental, health or economic benefits at a societal level (recognizing that UC ANR may be only one contributor towards these long-term outcomes). Selecting one or more condition changes will enable administration to know how the efforts and outcomes reported in this theme relate to changing conditions in California and beyond.
  • Outcome types represent short, medium, and long-term changes that occurred as a result of the work described in your theme. Selecting one or more outcome types enables administration to know what level of outcome has been actually measured/articulated.

More Information on Outcomes/Impacts

  • Articulate methods, outcomes, and impacts in paragraph form so that it tells a story. Do not use a bulleted list of outcomes separate from methods; this practice is confusing for the reviewer to match up which outcome and impacts goes with a specific method.
  • ANR has not adopted a strict logic model approach but encourages a program planning approach that allows the development of clear outcomes and impacts over time.  It is your responsibility to summarize your work to best communicate what you have accomplished and what outcomes, results and/or impact(s) your work has produced.
  • Condition Change Indicators and Sources: Use this google spreadsheet to identify condition change indicators that you can use to create a safe inference to connect your program outcomes to longer-term public benefits; for use in your impact writing (e.g., merit/promotion, UC Delivers, grant proposals/reports). The indicators are organized by ANR Public Values (one per sheet) and ANR Condition Changes (columns A of each sheet). This is a living document; it will continue to grow and please add your own indicators and sources!

Academic Administrator / Academic Coordinator / Administrative Appointments (adapted from 2020-2021 E-Book):

  • Briefly indicate your administrative goals; administration is not just about filling a position--there should be targeted change associated with the responsibilities.
  • Highlight your major accomplishments and provide evidence of outcomes and/or impacts related to your academic program coordination or administrative responsibilities during the reporting year. Below are examples of the themes you may want to write about (from 2020-2021 E-Book):
    • For administrative appointments: administration of program, leadership, budget, and partnerships and relationships.
    • For coordinator: (a) academic program planning and development; (b) assessment of program and constituency needs, (c) evaluation of academic program activity and functions; (d) development of proposals for extramural funding of campus programs and identification of support resources; (e) liaison representation with other agencies and institutions in the public and private sectors; (f) supervision and leadership of other academic appointees or staff.
  • Theme narratives should reflect the candidate’s time and effort with a proportionate amount of space allocated to both academic and administrative performance and achievement. For example, a 50% academic with a 50% administrative appointment, should have approximately half their narrative describing each component.

Examples and Resources:

Privacy / UC Delivers

Academic input informed the policy that themes will not be searchable and viewable by anyone other than system-level administrators (for accountability reporting), senior leadership, and supervisors.

After writing your theme narrative, you can click on a link to the UC Delivers system to submit a public impact story.

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Projects

Technical instructions:

  • Click on the Projects link in the top menu of Project Board
  • Click on the blue Add Project button.
  • Follow the onscreen instructions (hover over the “i” for even more help!) to complete each item in bold below.
  • To edit an existing project, click on the Project link in the top menu of Project Board, then click on the blue Edit link in the tile of the project which you would like to edit.

More information about projects:

Projects act as a virtual file folder to which you can link several Extension and Research/Creative activities. Projects entered into Project Board populate the "Project Summary Table" in the dossier export.

Features: You can add collaborators to  your projects and other people in ANR can search for your project in the Explore What's Happening in Cooperative Extension reporting tool.

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Tags

Tags are keywords that you can assign to projects and activities. Users can either select from existing lists of tags (Strategic Initiatives, Commodities, Statewide Programs & Institutes) or create user-defined tags. In the Explore What's Happening in Cooperative Extension reporting tool, queries against tags can be run for collaboration, advocacy, and accountability purposes.

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Collaborators

In projects and some activity types, you can add ANR collaborators and non-ANR collaborators.

When adding an ANR collaborator, names can be searched and selected from the existing ANR Directory. The benefit of adding an ANR collaborator to an activity is reducing data entry burden. For example, an activity owner can fill in all the logistical details (name, location, date, attendance, etc.), add a collaborator, then that collaborator will only need to type information about the role, theme, and clientele group assignment. Activities to which a collaborator is added will populate dossier exports.

The benefit of adding non-ANR collaborators is that the information will populate dossier exports. Additionally, specifying any qualifying Cooperative Extension and Agriculture Experiment Station academic collaborators from other state land-grant institutions will help ANR demonstrate compliance with the federal mandate to collaborate with other land-grant institutions.

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Explore What's Happening in Cooperative Extension

Technical instructions:

  • Click on the Explore link in the top menu of Project Board
  • Use the tags or keywords to run a search of less-sensitive data in Project Board (i.e., activity tables; more coming soon!)
  • Tip: Project Board automatically selects any tags that you have used. Remove the tags on the left by clicking the "x" button to exclude those tags from a new search.

This tool enables individuals in ANR to search less-sensitive Project Board information, such as activities (more search features coming soon). This tool aims to promote collaboration/partnerships within the ANR network and assist with advocacy efforts and organizational reporting.

In future phases of this tool, the ability for supervisors/campus monitors to track and assist with reporting compliance will be included.

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Activity Types

Technical instructions:

  • Click on the Activities link in the top menu of Project Board
  • Use the Activities sub-menu to navigate between the three activity categories: 1) Extension, Effort, Research, Creative; 2) University and Public Service; and 3) Professional Competence
  • Click on the blue Add Activity button to add a new activity.
  • Follow the onscreen instructions (hover over the “i” for even more help!) to complete each item in bold below.
  • To edit an existing activity, click on the Activity link in the top menu of Project Board, then identify the activity you wish to edit and click anywhere on its tile to edit. 

More information about activities:

Activities are designed to meet several Academic Program Review, Civil Rights Compliance, and Organizational Reporting requirements. Activities have different features and searchability in the Explore What's Happening in Cooperative Extension reporting tool, which have been determined by user input: 

1. Extension + Research/Creative Activities: Link to projects/themes, link to a clientele group to report attendance, add collaborators and tags, searchable in reporting tool
2. All Reasonable Effort (A.R.E.) Activities: Link to a clientele group, optionally add tags.
3. University/Public Service + Professional Competence Activities: Searchable in the reporting tool, data fields are determined by the E-Book.

Direct Extension activity types have the option to report attendance numbers.

  • To report External Audience attendance, click on "Search Clientele Groups" then select the clientele group that you want to report against. Attendance by demographic categories is reported for "individual" and "family" clientele groups is required for civil rights compliance. Civil rights compliance analysis is only performed on external audiences/clientele. Attendance totals populate the dossier export.
  • To report Internal/Statewide Program attendance, simple enter the number of attendees. Attendance by demographic groups is not required for individuals that are internal to ANR (E.g., staff, volunteers) and for individuals that are already being reported by demographic group in other reporting system of Statewide Programs (e.g., 4-H, CFHL, UC, CalNat, EFNEP, MG, MFP). Civil rights compliance analysis is performed using data outside of Project Board for these groups. Attendance totals populate the dossier export.
  • If you do not have attendance data, you an select "Choose not to report." This means that the attendance for this activity will not be included in civil rights compliance analysis or in dossier exports.

The table below provides definitions of each activity type, tips, and descriptions of how the information is used in Academic Program Review, Civil Rights Compliance, and Organizational Reporting.

Activity Type

Help Text (Definitions, Examples, Tips)

How this information will be used:

Extension Activities

Meeting Organized

Classes, short courses, demonstrations, field days, fairs, webinars, Extension meetings, etc. that you organize. If you had additional roles besides organizer, note them in the "roles" field.

Tip: An Extension Activity is directly related to your own program clientele. If this activity did not serve your clientele, consider putting it in University/Public Service or Evidence of Professional Competence.

-Populates Extension Activity tables in dossier export.
-Audience demographics included in Civil Rights Compliance analysis.
-Organizational reporting of Extension Activities and Extension Contacts.

Train the Trainer

Trainings you deliver to professionals who then extend information. For volunteer capacity building, use another activity type (e.g., Public Service, Meeting Organized).

Tip: An Extension Activity is directly related to your own program clientele. If this activity did not serve your clientele, consider putting it in University/Public Service or Evidence of Professional Competence.

-Populates Extension Activity tables in dossier export.
-Audience demographics included in Civil Rights Compliance analysis.
-Organizational reporting of Extension Activities and Extension Contacts.

Educational Presentation at meetings

Oral presentations and posters that you deliver at meetings organized by someone else. If you provided supervision or support for a staff member, use the "Extension Activity Delivered by Your Staff" type.

Tip: An Extension Activity is directly related to your own program clientele. If this activity did not serve your clientele, consider putting it in University/Public Service or Evidence of Professional Competence.

-Populates Extension Activity tables in dossier export.
-Audience demographics included in Civil Rights Compliance analysis.
-Organizational reporting of Extension Contacts.

Ongoing collaboration with other agency or organization

Extension of knowledge and information via ongoing collaborations. Clientele served may be the collaborating organizations/agencies or the individuals reached by the collaboration, depending on the nature of your position/program/clientele.

Tip: An Extension Activity is directly related to your own program clientele. If this activity did not serve your clientele, consider putting it in University/Public Service or Evidence of Professional Competence.

-Populates Extension Activity tables in dossier export.
-Audience demographics included in Civil Rights Compliance analysis.
-Organizational reporting of Extension Contacts.

Policy Engagement

Extension of knowledge and information to clientele during any step in policy development and implementation, such as building relationships/leading coalitions; equipping decision-makers with the data they need to develop successful policies; monitoring and assessing formal decision-making by proper authorities; informing policy or regulatory compliance options and actions; etc. Report policy briefs and white papers in your non-peer reviewed publications list. Anything listed here should not be duplicated in other activity types or publications.

Tip: An Extension Activity is directly related to your own program clientele. If this activity did not serve your clientele, consider putting it in University/Public Service or Evidence of Professional Competence.

-Populates Extension Activity tables in dossier export.
-Audience demographics included in Civil Rights Compliance analysis.
-Organizational reporting of Extension Contacts.

Individual Clientele Contacts

Direct extension via technical assistance or one-on-one interactions to your own program clientele where there is a significant educational exchange. Consider lumping several individual clientele contacts of one clientele group into one activity record for more efficient reporting and analysis.

-Does NOT populate Extension Activity tables in dossier export, per E-Book policy.
-Audience demographics included in Civil Rights Compliance analysis.
-Organizational reporting of Extension Contacts.

Website/Blog/Social Media Managed

Management of specific sites/platforms/accounts you use to extend knowledge and information. You may list statistics in the description field. You may list the number of posts or blog in the instances field. Extensive and substantial posts should be listed in non-peer reviewed publications.

Tip: An Extension Activity is directly related to your own program clientele. If this activity did not serve your clientele, consider putting it in University/Public Service or Evidence of Professional Competence.

-Populates Extension Activity tables in dossier export.
-Targeted demographic groups included in Civil Rights Compliance analysis.
-Organizational reporting of Extension Activities.

Media Outlet Program/Interview

Radio, television or other mass media outlet programs/interviews in which you deliver significant educational content via a media outlet program or interview. Alternatively, if significant educational content was not delivered and the activity was used an invitation to potential clientele, consider using the A.R.E. Outreach method, "mass media."
Tip: An Extension Activity is directly related to your own program clientele. If this activity did not serve your clientele, consider putting it in University/Public Service or Evidence of Professional Competence.

-Populates Extension Activity tables in dossier export.
-Targeted demographic groups included in Civil Rights Compliance analysis.
-Organizational reporting of Extension Activities.

Other Extension Activity

As much as possible, do not use this activity type. Try your best to find another activity type that encompasses this activity. If you must use this activity type, use it sparingly.

Tip: An Extension Activity is directly related to your own program clientele. If this activity did not serve your clientele, consider putting it in University/Public Service or Evidence of Professional Competence.

-Populates Extension Activity tables in dossier export.
-Audience demographics included in Civil Rights Compliance analysis.
-Organizational reporting of Extension Contacts.

Extension Activity Delivered by Your Staff

Efforts in supporting the Extension Activities of your staff/volunteers. Consider lumping several activities into one activity record for more efficient reporting and analysis.

*Special Instructions for the following Statewide Programs: UC 4-H, UC CalFresh Nutrition Education, California Naturalist, EFNEP, UC Master Food Preserver, UC Master Gardener:

There is no need to duplicate participant demographics of Extension Activities delivered by staff/volunteers/partners if those demographics are already being entered in other Statewide Program online reporting systems (4hOnline, PEARS, WEBNEERS, VMS). Civil Rights Compliance analysis and organizational reporting will utilize data directly from those Statewide Programs' systems!

-Populates a separate table in your dossier export, per E-Book policy. 
-Audience demographics included in Civil Rights Compliance analysis.*
-Organizational reporting of Extension Activities and Extension Contacts.*

Research and Creative Activities

Research

Basic and applied research, program evaluation, and needs assessment activities.

-Does NOT populate Extension Activity tables in dossier export; instead, summarize in your Program Summary Narrative.
-NOT included in Civil Rights Compliance analysis.
-Organizational reporting of Extension Activities.

Digital Media

Development of non-peer reviewed videos, applications, software, or other audio/visual educational products, recorded webinars, others. Print materials should be listed in non-peer reviewed publications.

-Populates Extension Activity tables in dossier export.
-NOT included in Civil Rights Compliance analysis.
-Organizational reporting of Extension Activities.

Other Research / Creative Activity

As much as possible, do not use this activity type. Try your best to find another activity type that encompasses this activity. If you must use this activity type, use it sparingly.

-Populates Extension Activity tables in dossier export.
-NOT included in Civil Rights Compliance analysis.

All Reasonable Efforts (A.R.E.) for Civil Rights Compliance

A.R.E. Individual Efforts

Personal (e.g., face-to-face) visits/interactions to invite individuals from potential clientele groups to participate in programs, informing them of dates and times of program activities and specific invitations for them to attend and participate. Consider lumping several individual efforts related to one clientele group into one activity record for more efficient reporting and analysis.

Does NOT populate Extension Activity tables in dossier export.
-Included in Civil Rights Compliance analysis. All Reasonable Effort is defined as the utilization of three of the four federally approved outreach methods to ensure that eligible individuals from protected/underrepresented groups are aware of, invited to participate and benefit from appropriate ANR-CE programs.

A.R.E. Mass Media Efforts

Mass media to invite potential clientele to participate in programs. Examples include press releases, public service announcements, radio and/or television appearances, social media, and other web-based avenues. Can be in electronic and print outlets. Consider lumping several mass media efforts related to one clientele group into one activity record for more efficient reporting and analysis. If this activity included delivery of significant educational content, consider using one of the "Extension and/or A.R.E. Outreach" activity types so that it will be included in both dossier tables and Civil Rights Compliance analysis.

-Does NOT populate Extension Activity tables in dossier export.
-Included in Civil Rights Compliance analysis. All Reasonable Effort is defined as the utilization of three of the four federally approved outreach methods to ensure that eligible individuals from protected/underrepresented groups are aware of, invited to participate and benefit from appropriate ANR-CE programs.

A.R.E. Promotional Materials Efforts

Promotional material to invite potential clientele to participate in programs. Examples include newsletters, posters, and flyers distributed in a "mass mailing" type of process. Can be in hardcopy or electronic format. Consider lumping several promotion materials efforts related to one clientele group into one activity record for more efficient reporting and analysis. Newsletters with significant educational content should be reported in non-peer reviewed publications.

-Does NOT populate Extension Activity tables in dossier export; instead, summarize in your Program Summary Narrative.
-Included in Civil Rights Compliance analysis. All Reasonable Effort is defined as the utilization of three of the four federally approved outreach methods to ensure that eligible individuals from protected/underrepresented groups are aware of, invited to participate and benefit from appropriate ANR-CE programs.

A.R.E. Personal Letter Efforts

Personal letters to invite individuals from potential clientele groups to participate in programs, informing them of dates and times of program activities and specific invitations for them to attend and participate. Can be in hardcopy or electronic format. Consider lumping several personal letter efforts related to one clientele group into one activity record for more efficient reporting and analysis.

-Does NOT populate Extension Activity tables in dossier export; instead, summarize in your Program Summary Narrative.
-Included in Civil Rights Compliance analysis. All Reasonable Effort is defined as the utilization of three of the four federally approved outreach methods to ensure that eligible individuals from protected/underrepresented groups are aware of, invited to participate and benefit from appropriate ANR-CE programs.

Other Outreach Activity

Examples include community groups, joint activities, membership drives, volunteer recruitment. These other outreach methods are not federally approved for civil rights compliance, but can be helpful in demonstrating a good faith effort toward reaching parity.

-Does NOT populate Extension Activity tables in dossier export.
-Included in Civil Rights Compliance analysis. All Reasonable Effort is defined as the utilization of three of the four federally approved outreach methods to ensure that eligible individuals from protected/underrepresented groups are aware of, invited to participate and benefit from appropriate ANR-CE programs.

University/Public Service and Professional Competence Activities

University Service

University service may occur at the local, division, state, national, or international level. Examples:
-Advocacy efforts
-Committee service (which years)
-Workgroup chair, treasurer, secretary, etc.
-Leadership in strategic initiative activities and program teams

-Populates University and Public Service tables in dossier export.

Public Service

Public service should involve activities and events in which professional expertise is used to benefit groups or efforts outside the University. Examples:
-Serving on external boards, commissions or councils
-Participating in community events or fairs
-Leadership of non-University collaborative groups, councils

-Populates University and Public Service tables in dossier export.

Professional Development and Training

Training activity examples:
-Workgroup and non-workgroup training activities
-Attendance at conferences, symposia and workshops
-Administrative or technology trainings

-Populates Professional Competence tables in dossier export.

Evidence of Professional Competence

Activities that reflect your professional standing. Examples:
-Conferences, meetings/trainings that you organized for professionals or colleagues (including workgroups)
-Professional society presentations and/or offices held
-Presentations you were invited to give due to your professional competence
-Books or journals edited, articles reviewed or refereed
-Webinars developed for statewide and/or nationwide peers
-Sabbatical/special leaves

-Populates Professional Competence tables in dossier export.

 

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Academic Program Review

Links to AHR website for E-Book and dossier examples: https://ucanr.edu/sites/anrstaff/Personnel_Benefits/Academic_Personnel/PR_Dossier_Examples/

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Civil Rights Compliance Instructions

2020 Affirmative Action/Civil Rights Compliance Trainings

 

Contents

I. Background
II. Establishing baseline – Instructions for race and ethnicity
III. Collecting Extension Activity participants’ race and ethnicity
IV. Self-identify and tally sheet templates
V. Aggregating and reporting Extension Activity contacts’ race and ethnicity
VI. Statewide Program instructions
VII. County Director/Supervisor roles
VIII. Example: Advisor baseline story

PDF version of this section: Project Board Civil Rights Compliance instructions


I.
Background

Civil Rights Compliance is about ensuring that University of California Agriculture and Natural Resources (UC ANR) is serving all Californians and who we serve reflects the race, ethnicity, and gender diversity of California’s population. Project Board aims to provide academics with an intuitive tool for capturing the Civil Rights Compliance information we are required to document, ensuring that UC ANR does not discriminate. Collecting and reporting Civil Rights Compliance is not an exact science. This document provides guidance on how to capture this information to the best of our ability.

As a recipient of federal funds, UC ANR is required to collect race, ethnicity, and gender data to determine how effectively programs are reaching eligible persons and beneficiaries and to monitor compliance with federal laws and regulations.

The U.S. Office of Management and Budget issued revised standards for collecting and reporting race and ethnicity data. As a result, UC ANR includes this new race and ethnicity reporting information in Project Board in order to maintain compliance with federal regulations.

The demographic categories create a clear separation of race and Hispanic/Latino ethnicity and provide an additional race category.

Ethnicity:

  • HISPANIC OR LATINO: a person of Cuban, Mexican, Chicano, Puerto Rican, South or Central American, or other Spanish culture or origin, regardless of race.
  • Not Hispanic or Latino.

Race:

  • AMERICAN INDIAN OR ALASKA NATIVE: a person having origins in any of the original peoples of North and South America (including Central America), and who maintains tribal affiliation or community attachment.
  • ASIAN: a person having origins in any of the original peoples of the Far East, Southeast Asia, or the Indian subcontinent, including, for example, Cambodia, China, India, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Pakistan, the Philippine Islands, Thailand, and Vietnam.
  • BLACK OR AFRICAN AMERICAN (not of Hispanic origin): a person having origins in any of the black racial groups of Africa.
  • NATIVE HAWAIIAN OR OTHER PACIFIC ISLANDER: a person having origins in any of the original peoples of Hawaii, Guam, Samoa, or other Pacific Islands.
  • WHITE (not of Hispanic origin): a person having origins in any of the original peoples of Europe, the Middle East, or North Africa.

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II. Establishing baseline – Instructions for race and ethnicity

Important new information: Academics are not required to create clientele groups, identify baseline information, or report contacts for audiences that are internal to ANR (i.e., staff and academics). Additionally, contacts and activities that are already being reported in other statewide program online systems do not need to be duplicated in Project Board; see Section VI. Statewide Program instructions for Civil Rights Compliance in Project Board.

Clientele group baselines are created using data from the U.S. Census, AgCensus, EdData and other available sources. Establishing baseline often involves pulling together multiple sources, talking to people in the field, or aggregating multiple counties to reflect multiple county assignments into one clientele group. It is important to document how you formed your baseline given that there are so many ways baseline can be established in University of California Cooperative Extension. It is preferred that you lump rather than split clientele groups whenever possible to create fewer groups. If you are concerned about lumping groups that are too different in demographic makeup, you may keep them separated. For more information about establishing clientele groups and baseline in general, please contact your County Director or immediate supervisor. The remaining instructions below are specific to race and ethnicity.

Creating a new clientele group baseline in Project Board:

  • First, complete the Hispanic/Latino baseline by providing the estimated number of Hispanic/Latino individuals in the “Hispanic/Latino” ethnicity category. Then put the remaining individuals in the “Not Hispanic/Latino” category or undetermined category. The numbers in all three ethnicity categories should equal your total baseline.
  • Second, complete race totals. If you use sources like U.S. Census and AgCensus that collect race and ethnicity information as separate questions, then entering in the data for race and ethnic groups in Project Board can be done without needing to rearrange the data. However, if you use sources like EdData that combine the race and ethnicity categories as one question, then enter the same total number of individuals in the “Hispanic/Latino” ethnicity category in the “Race not listed above” or “undetermined” race category, and do not count any of these individuals again for any other race. Proceed with inputting numbers into each race category. The numbers in all race categories should equal your total baseline.

Update your clientele group baseline if you know that the demographic makeup of the populations you serve has changed (i.e., if you notice or hear from other sources that there have been increases or decreases in the racial/ethnic makeup of population served). If you are only using census data, update when new census data is available.

Note: CASA clientele groups will be imported into Project Board and baselines will be converted using these guidelines. Please review and revise your imported clientele groups as needed when the system launches in 2018.

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III. Collecting Extension Activity participants’ race and ethnicity

Participants or recipients of Extension Activities are considered “clientele contacts.” Extension Activities include extending knowledge and information to both individuals (such as by providing email and telephone technical assistance) and groups (such as through hosting meetings and presenting talks at external meetings). There are two methods in which UC ANR academics and staff can obtain the race and ethnicity of Extension Activity participants.

  • Ask individual to self-identify. (ANR resource: See section IV for self-identify half-page questionnaire)

OR

  • Make a visual estimate of the group by race and ethnicity. (ANR resource: See section IV for tally sheet)

Option 1 – Self-Identify: Individuals must first self-identify as Hispanic/Latino or not Hispanic/Latino, regardless of their racial background. Then, individuals select all race categories that apply to them (if two or more categories are selected, they are reported into Project Board as “more than one race”). To reduce confusion, you may tell Hispanic/Latino individuals that if they select yes to Hispanic/Latino, they may select “Race not listed above” for the race question.

Option 2 – Visual Estimate: UC ANR staff/academics should first visually estimate the proportion of the group that is of Hispanic/Latino ethnicity and document this number in the “Hispanic/Latino” ethnicity category. Document the remaining number of individuals in the “Not Hispanic/Latino” ethnicity category. Then, of the “Not Hispanic/Latino” audiences, visually estimate the proportion of group that is of each race category and put this number in the corresponding race category counts.

Combination of Option 1 and Option 2 – When computing the total participation at an event, gaps from participants who declined to state may be filled in through visual identification by the advisor. For instance, when only three people self-identified as White and many others declined to state, if the advisor remembers seeing six people who appear to be racially White in the audience, then the advisor would add three to the total number of White participants reported, for a total of six.

U.S. Office of Management and Budget policy information: Self-identification using two separate questions is the preferred method for collecting data on race and ethnicity. The collection of greater detail is encouraged; however, any collection that uses more detail shall be organized in such a way that the additional categories can be aggregated into these minimum categories for data on race and ethnicity. If self-identification is not appropriate or feasible, observer-collected data on race and ethnicity may be used. If a participant chooses not to self-identify his/her racial and/or ethnic group, visual identification by a program staff member must be used to determine the participant’s racial and ethnic categories. Selection of one race is acceptable when local agency staff performs visual identification.

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IV. Self-Identify and tally sheet templates

These templates match Project Board’s demographic categories. If you are associated with a Statewide Program that provides self-identify forms and reporting systems, please continue to use those forms and processes.

TallySheet_VisualEstimate_CivilRightsCompliance 20190610
SelfIdentify_Halfpagecards_Revised 20190530

 

V. Aggregating and reporting Extension Activity contacts’ race and ethnicity

After collecting participants’ race and ethnicity information, academics aggregate gender, ethnicity, and race totals and report them into Project Board via an Extension Activity type. Gender, ethnicity, and race totals must equal the total number of participants in that Extension Activity.

Tips/Examples:

  • If you had 20 participants and 15 were of Hispanic/Latino ethnicity, then the five remaining participants should be reported in either the “Non-Hispanic/Latino” group or “Prefer not to state/Undetermined” group, so that the total is 20.
  • If a person self-identifies as Hispanic/Latino and Asian, this individual is reported in the “Hispanic/Latino” ethnicity category and the “Asian” race category.
  • Individuals who are of multiple races must be aggregated and reported in the “More than one race” race category.
  • If you using visual identification of the audience’s demographic breakdown, people who appear to be of Hispanic/Latino ethnicity are reported in the “Hispanic/Latino” ethnicity category and the “Race not listed above” race category.

Important new information: If the audience of your Extension activity is internal to ANR (i.e., staff and academics), you do not need to report the demographic breakdown of your contacts. Additionally, if the audience is already being reported in another statewide program’s online system, it does not need to be reported again in Project Board; see Section VI. Statewide Program instructions for Civil Rights Compliance in Project Board.

 

VI. Statewide Program Instructions for Civil Rights Compliance in Project Board

Civil Rights Compliance analysis is conducted by ANR Affirmative Action at the individual academic level using information entered into Project Board as well as at the statewide program level by county using their respective online systems.

UC 4-H, UC CalFresh Nutrition Education Program, California Naturalists, Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP), UC Master Food Preserver, and UC Master Gardener Statewide Programs provide specific self-identify forms, processes, and online reporting systems. Please continue to use the documents and procedures as indicated by affiliated statewide programs. The general guidelines below describe the information that should be entered into Project Board and efforts have been made to streamline and reduce duplicative data entry when possible. Detailed instructions for each statewide program are under development.

Currently only academics can enter information into Project Board. Staff use of Project Board will not be available until future phases.

What Civil Rights Compliance information should be entered into Project Board by CE academics affiliated with statewide programs?

  • All Reasonable Effort (A.R.E.) Activities conducted by the CE academic.
    • Please note in the “description” field that these are conducted by you.
    • These will be considered in your individual Civil Rights Compliance analysis.
  • A.R.E. Activities conducted by staff/volunteers/partners for the statewide program.
    • Please note in the “description” field that these are conducted by staff/volunteers.
    • These will be considered in the statewide program’s Civil Rights Compliance analysis.
  • Extension Activities that are co-delivered by a CE academic and staff/volunteers.
    • The CE academic reports the activity information into Project Board and the staff/volunteers report both activity information and demographic breakdown of participants into their statewide program’s reporting system.
    • OMIT demographic breakdown of participants in Project Board since staff/volunteers will be providing the same information in the statewide program’s reporting system.
  • Extension Activities delivered only by the CE academic directly to Extension clientele, including demographic breakdown of participants.
  • Optional: Extension Activities delivered only by staff/volunteers.
    • Per the E-Book, it is highly recommended that academics summarize these activities in the program summary narrative. Only list activities where significant intellectual input was provided. These will be exported in a separate table from those personally delivered. Also include your role in these activities that your staff or others delivered.
    • OMIT demographic breakdown of participants in Project Board since staff/volunteers will be providing the same information in the statewide program’s reporting system.

 

What is the difference between All Reasonable Effort (A.R.E.) Activities and Extension Activities?

A.R.E. Activities are methods that can be taken to recruit new members and adult volunteers in the community to come to an event. They are entered by academics into Project Board using one of the A.R.E. Activity types.

Extension Activities provide a learning experience or significant educational exchange to clientele. Extension Activities conducted by volunteers/staff/partners should be reported in the statewide program’s online reporting system.

What do I do if the event does not fit within one of the categories in my statewide program’s reporting system?

Most events should fit within the statewide program’s existing reporting system categories. However, A.R.E. Activities do not fit within the statewide program’s system categories and should be entered into Project Board; use the description field to indicate if the A.R.E. Activities were conducted by staff, volunteers, or the academic themselves.

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VII. County Director/Supervisor roles in relation to Project Board

Interpreting Civil Rights Compliance statistics – The following questions are provided to help supervisors in analyzing the descriptive statistics provided in Project Board for each academic.

  • Is parity achieved for each demographic sub-group in the clientele group? If not, have you established A.R.E. for these demographic sub-groups (utilized at least three of the four A.R.E. methods)?
  • Are there any common demographics groups that are out of parity?
  • Can any improvements be made to the clientele group description or categorization for efficiency?
    • Are they up to date?
    • Are they logical (does the clientele group reflect the CE Advisors’ program)?
    • It is recommended to lump, rather than split: Can some clientele groups across counties be lumped into one?

Annual discussion – The following questions are provided to help supervisors in facilitating a dialogue about Civil Rights Compliance. These conversations should occur annually as part of the performance review meeting, with input/guidance from additional Statewide Program supervisors.

  • For demographic sub-groups in parity: What A.R.E. methods worked well? How did you achieve this? What should be done to ensure parity is maintained?
  • For demographic sub-groups not in parity: What A.R.E. methods worked well or what did not work? What is a realistic goal for achieving parity (increase by x% for next year, goal of achieving parity in x years)? What are my strategies for achieving this goal?
  • Develop a multi-year plan to achieve parity and an inclusive program:
    • Get best practices from other academics who are in parity with similar groups or have similar county demographics.
    • Get multiple stakeholders/partners involved in your plan to increase participation (e.g., co-planning events, leveraging each other’s resources).
    • Use positive language. “Underrepresented” or “underserved” are more positive terms than “disadvantaged.”
    • Analyze and create strategies for each demographic sub-group separately. Recognize the problems and solutions for each demographic sub-group will likely vary.
    • Consider short term solutions. What A.R.E. outreach methods are being used? How can they be improved?
    • Consider working towards long term solutions with proven success, such as hiring staff who have experience and success working with American Indian tribes or indigenous communities.
    • Annually review, celebrate progress, and revise plan.

ANR’s annual supervisor training will be revised to include this information starting 2018.

Resources for Supervisors and Academics/Staff Notes for Annual Discussion/Equity Planning
Schauber, A.C. (2001). Effecting Extension Organizational Change Toward Cultural Diversity: A Conceptual Framework. Journal of Extension, 39, 3.  https://www.joe.org/joe/2001june/a1.php Proposes the “Organizational Diversity Climate Framework” for Extension and provides a conceptual framework. Predecessor to the article immediately below.
Schauber, A.C. (2001). Talk Around the Coffeepot: A Key to Cultural Change Toward Diversity. Journal of Extension, 39, 6. https://joe.org/joe/2001december/a1.php Utilized “Organizational Diversity Climate Framework” to study diversity climate in one Extension system. Provides detailed description of themes related to “supportive, uncertain, and defensive” dimensions. Can be used in discussions for equity planning.
Iverson, S.V. (2008). Now Is the Time for Change: Reframing Diversity Planning at Land-Grant Universities. Journal of Extension, 46, 1.  https://joe.org/joe/2008february/a3.php  Provides specific actions for achieving equity based on a review of 21 “diversity action plans” at 20 land grant universities.
Shauber, A.C., & Castania, K. (2001). Facing Issues of Diversity: Rebirthing the Extension Service. Journal of Extension, 39, 6. https://www.joe.org/joe/2001december/comm2.php Focuses on organizational level shifts (i.e., may not be helpful for local equity plans) but provides helpful language and context about diversity in Extension.

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VII. Example: Advisor Baseline Story

What is your clientele group? Agricultural production in the county consists of both nursery stock and various agricultural row crops. These clientele were grouped together as their numbers are small in the county and receive similar content.

How did you develop baseline demographic information? Initially the baseline was developed from those individuals licensed to produce agricultural crops in the crop through the Agricultural Commissioner’s Office. Demographic breakdowns were not included in the data they provided so an additional step required observation at grower events, interviewing Farm Bureau staff, and additional online investigation. This baseline is now shared with advisors in the county serving the same clientele.

How and for what reason did you update baseline demographics?   Unfortunately, I quickly realized that the actual attendees were management and field staff, who were attending on behalf of the licensed growers. This requires frequent updates to the baseline to include these new clientele benefiting from CE programs. This updating is done through a combination of personal introductions to new clientele at meetings, reviewing attendance sheets, and general observations of attendees of extension events. Producers are reluctant to provide employee lists information and employee turnover is high so the information can be outdated quickly.

Any lessons learned? I attempted to use AgCensus but I wasn’t able to utilize the results in total because it lists information by operators and that again only tells you the owner and not the actual audience you are reaching when the owner doesn’t attend your extension activities. It is a good start. Other strategies: searching for grower web sites to glean as much information from staff lists and photos as possible; get to know them personally.

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Sources

  • An Affirmative Action, Civil Rights and Equal Opportunity Orientation Guide. UC ANR Orientation Guide. Pages 67-75.
  • Notice of Intent to Revise a Currently Approved Information Collection. Federal Register, vol. 81, no. 39. February 29, 2016 (pages 10211-10212).
  • New Standards for Collecting and Reporting Race and Ethnicity Data for the National Reporting System. U.S. Department of Education National Reporting System Tips.

 

Presentations by Affirmative Action

Civil Rights Compliance and Outreach (why ANR collects this data, how to collect the data): http://ucanr.edu/sites/anrstaff/files/272999.pdf

Introduction to Reporting (brief introduction for statewide program volunteers): https://ucop.box.com/s/8jhhge8p27mbw7l125748bpxrm4mc9dw

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Full Time Equivalent (FTE) Reporting

FTE reporting varies year to year, but is typically due July 1st (i.e., you do NOT need to update it for the February 1st due date). Click on a link to below to see the most current call for FTE reporting with instructions and FAQs:

CE Advisors - Call for reporting due July 1, 2020

Academic Administrators/Coordinators, CE Specialists, Professional Researchers, Project Scientists, and Research Specialist (with ANR M+P)- Call for reporting due July 1, 2020

 

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Organizational Reporting

Program Planning and Evaluation (PPE) uses the information collected in Project Board for the following purposes:

  • UC ANR's federal plan and report of work
  • UC ANR's contributions to the UC annual accountability report, sustainability report, Office of the President budget reports, ad hoc requests
  • Program planning & resource allocation (e.g., academic programmatic footprint report for Call for Positions)
  • Legislative/External/Internal Requests
  • Compliance with federal requirements (e.g., meeting 25% targets of multistate and integrated work)

 

Data Elements

Most organizational reporting needs are met by the data elements required for Civil Rights Compliance and the Academic Program Review dossier template (described above in Themes, Projects, Activities sections) with the exception of only four data elements:

  1. Organizational Tags: Primary Program Area is a required field in Projects and Extension Activities. Condition Change is a required fields in Theme (outcome/impact) narratives and full time equivalent (FTE) reporting. These enables PPE to aggregate the unique work of academics as best as possible into broad categories for reporting. Definitions:
    • Program Areas: The broad subject matters currently covered by ANR’s Program Team umbrella structure. In Project Board, assigning a Program Area to Extension Activities and Projects enables ANR to aggregate as best as possible the unique work that academics do in the field for accountability and advocacy purposes. View ANR's Program Team webpage for a complete listing of program areas.
    • Condition Changes: Represent broad environmental, health or economic benefits at a societal level (recognizing that UC ANR may be only one contributor towards these long-term outcomes). Selecting one or more condition changes will enable administration to know how the efforts and outcomes reported in this theme relate to changing conditions in California and beyond. View ANR's webpage for additional information and a complete listing of condition changes.
  2. Research/Creative activities: These are counted as outputs in accountability reports. While academics can summarize these in Program Summary Narratives, there is no table for these activity types in the dossier.
  3. Multistate elements: These elements appear in full time equivalent (FTE) or effort reporting, as well as in Projects. This information helps UC ANR acquire and document compliance with federal requirements. Definitions:
    • Multistate: Efforts that involve Cooperative Extension academics from two or more states or Agriculture Experiment Station academics from two or more states.
    • Integrated: Efforts that involve at least one Cooperative Extension academic and at least one Agriculture Experiment Station academic, regardless of state.
  4. County FTE reporting: Required only for county-based academics, this data element supports UC ANR's annual county fund source reports.

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FAQs

     Project/Activity Questions
     Theme Questions
     Civil Rights Compliance Questions
     Dossier Export Questions
     Interfolio Questions
     Overview/Timeline of Project Board and Interfolio processes
     COVID-19 Guidance

 

Project/Activity Questions

 

1) Can an activity be linked to multiple projects? Similarly, can a project be linked to multiple themes?

No. Activities can only be linked to one project or theme. Projects can only be linked to one theme. In the real world, activities/projects can relate to multiple themes, but in Project Board you will need to pick a single link.

 

2) What if I am not added as a collaborator to an activity, but feel as if I am a collaborator?

Verbally request it from the activity owner. If they still don’t do it, add it yourself so it’s included in your dossier export and you get credit in your review.

 

3) Where do I put my peer and non-peer reviewed citations?

In the ANR Online Bibliography, which can be accessed via the ANR Profile editing page in ANR Portal.

 

4) Where do I put presentations at national conferences? Extension activities or professional competence?

Professional competence, per the E-Book.

 

5) Where do I put presentations to ANR colleagues at a conference? Is this professional competence or university service?

Professional competence makes the most sense if you were invited to speak based on your knowledge and experience, per the E-Book

 

6) How do I report my project outcomes? / Why am I not asked to report outcomes at the project-level?

User input over the years indicated that a project may not have measurable outcomes (knowledge gain, behavior change, policy change, condition change) each year. Additionally, some users indicated that the program summary narrative (i.e., "themes" reporting in Project Board) is the place that they write their best outcome stories. Thus, outcomes reporting is no longer required at the project level as it was in DANRIS-X; it is only required at the "theme" level in Project Board.

 

7) Under what circumstances would I "show" and "hide" audience attendance in the Extension Activity forms?

By clicking "show," you are indicating that you want to report demographic information of clientele contacts for this activity. You only have to report demographics for clientele who are external to ANR and listed as one of your clientele groups.

By clicking "hide," you are indicating that you do NOT want to report demographic information of clientele contacts for this activity. You do NOT have to report clientele contact demographics for clientele who are a) internal to ANR (staff, academics, volunteers) or b) already reporting in another statewide program reporting system (4hOnline, PEARS, WEBNEERS, VMS, etc.).

 

8) I typed in the date (single, range, or ongoing) for a project or activity; why does Project Board record a different date?

For some users, typing in the date causes problems. Please use the "date clicker" to enter in dates.

 

9) My activity won't save. What do I do?

a) For some users, typing in the date causes problems with saving the activity. Please use the "date clicker" to enter in dates and try saving again.

b) If you see a red circle over the "save" button, it means the system thinks you have no changed any data in that form. So you may have already saved it, or you may need need to refresh your web browser because the internet connection may be poor and not registering your changes.

 

10) Where do I put mentions of my work in trade publications? Sometimes it’s just a quote, sometimes they’ll take a photo of every slide we post at a talk and write up an article later. 

Consider one of these two Extension Activity types: “media outlet program/interview” or “evidence of professional competence.” As an FYI, the activity would only be counted for ANR annual reporting (ANR annual report, federal report, etc.) if you list it as a “media outlet program/interview.” We don’t count up professional service, university service, or professional competence activities for these purposes.

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Theme Questions

 

1) In my PR I provide an overall summary for each theme with clientele, needs and goals , but then list methods, outcomes, impacts under each project. Do I have to change how I write this in Project Board?

No, You can continue your exact process that you’ve been doing; here is the technical instruction on how to do so:

  • Each theme form has two narrative textboxes: 1) Background, clientele, goals, inputs; and 2) Methods, Outcomes, Impacts.
  • In the first narrative textbox, summarize as you normally would the clientele, needs and goals for the theme.
  • In the second narrative textbox, use the text formatting editor to create project sub-headings and proceed with describing the methods/outcomes/impacts under each project.

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Civil Rights Compliance Questions

 

1) What if a clientele group includes individuals AND organizations? Can they be lumped into one group?

No. You will have to create and report against separate clientele groups for individuals and for organizations.

 

2) If an Extension Activity is with a “one time” clientele group, and not with an ongoing clientele group, do I add the clientele group for just a one-time activity? A “one time” clientele group could mean a group in another county to which you are not assigned, or a different type of clientele in your county that you don’t typically serve.

No. Instead, you may do one of the following:

  • If the "one time" clientele group is similar to one of your existing clientele groups, go ahead and link that Extension Activity to that existing clientele group. Example: If you are asked to conduct an Extension Activity in another part of the state (not one of your assigned counties), you can link to one of your existing clientele group.
  • Utilize a non-Extension activity type, such as "Public Service" or "Evidence of Professional Competence." You do not need to link these activity types to a clientele group.

 

3) How do I report my contacts?

  • Click on Activities in the Project Board menu and then the blue Add Activity icon.
  • Select the type of activity through which you made your contacts.
  • At the bottom of the activity form, you see the field “Clientele group” – if you click on it, you can select one of your existing clientele groups.
  • Select one of your clientele groups, then the form will expand (scroll down) and you will be able to report your contacts by ethnicity, race, and gender.
  • When you click save, these contacts will add to the descriptive statistics of each clientele group!
  • Tip: You do not need to report the demographic information of contacts if they are a) internal to ANR (staff, academics, volunteers) or b) already reporting in another statewide program reporting system (4hOnline, PEARS, WEBNEERS, VMS, etc.). If your clientele includes one of these, you can click the "hide" button on the "audience attendance" section of any Extension Activity form.

 

4) How do I report my All Reasonable Efforts (A.R.E.)?

  • Click on Activities in the Project Board menu and then the blue Add Activity icon.
  • Select one of the All Reasonable Effort (A.R.E.) activity types, listed on the bottom left corner of the pop up window.
  • Use the description field to qualitatively describe your use of that A.R.E. method to reach target clientele. Please lump, rather than split. For example, you can create one Mass Media Effort activity record that states that you sent monthly announcements through your social media inviting new clientele to your workshops accounts, rather than creating 12 Mass Media Effort records.
  • As a reminder, to be in compliance by A.R.E., an individual must use and report three of the four A.R.E. types for the year.

5) I am affiliated with a statewide program that already has its own reporting system for clientele contacts (4hOnline, WebNEERS, PEARS, VMS). If I am not supposed to duplicate reporting my contacts in Project Board, how will show my reviewers the attendance of my Extension activities?

Step 1 - In Project Board - Extension Activity forms, leave audience attendance blank (tip: Click "Hide" on that part of the form) when the clientele are already reporting in another statewide program reporting system. This will save you time because if you enter it in Project Board, you’ll have to provide audience by demographic breakdown (which is unnecessary because we already get that from the other reporting systems).

Step 2- When you export your dossier to MS Word, fill in the blank attendance column with the number so that your reviewers can still see it. (Note: In the future, Project Board will be programmed to capture this number in the Extension Activity form).

6) Do I have to report activities and clientele groups in Project Board? (FAQ for non-advisor academic positions but applies to all academics)

At minimum for ANR annual federal/organizational reporting purposes, please enter clientele group information for clientele who are external to ANR and enter Extension Activities information for activities with external clientele. All other activity types will populate the dossier export (optional for your use) but are not required for federal/organizational reporting.

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Dossier Export Questions

 

1) How do I get my dossier export from Project Board?

Click on the "Review & Compile" link in the top menu of Project Board. Select all of the items that you wish to include in your dossier export by clicking on the checkboxes next to themes, projects, and activities. Click on the blue "Export to Dossier" button on the right.

Your dossier won't export if there are any missing narrative fields in any of your themes. Click on "Themes" in the top menu of Project Board, fill in any missing fields on any missing themes, save, and try exporting again. A popup will be added the week of January 15th to address this confusion.

 

2) My dossier won't export because it says I have activities with missing information; how do I fix that?

  • Click on “Activities” in the top menu, then scroll through the list of activities looking for any “!” hazard symbols in the second column.
  • Click on the activity to edit and complete any missing fields.
  • Repeat this checking process for the other activity types by clicking on “University and Public Service” and Professional Competence” in the top sub-menu.
  • Once you no longer see any “!” hazard symbols in your activity lists, try exporting your dossier again.

 

3) My dossier export is missing some information or has highlighted yellow sections; what are those about?

These are placeholders for information that you add in your MS Word copy of your dossier. If you do not need that section, such as "Research Results," simply delete it.

We have received several requests to add some of these highlighted yellow sections/data fields into Project Board. We will consider these as more funding for Project Board becomes available.

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Interfolio Questions

 

1) How do I access Interfolio to upload my program review documents?

Please follow the exact instructions on this webpage: https://ucanr.edu/sites/ProjectBoardHelp/Accessing_Interfolio_for_Program_Review/

 

2) I've uploaded all of my required documents. The submit button is grey and it won't let me me click it, what do I do?

Click the refresh button on your browser (or Ctrl + R on your keyboard). The submit button should turn blue.

 

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Overview/Timeline of Project Board and Interfolio processes

1.  Complete your Annual Reporting Checklist.

2.  Use Project Board’s “Review & Compile” screen to select the items you wish to have populated into your dossier. Remember to select all or check the items you want to include in your dossier on the Themes, University Services, Public Service, Professional Development and Training, and Evidence of Professional Competence review screens. If you have any missing fields preventing the dossier from exporting, please follow these instructions.

  • Click on “Activities” in the top menu, then scroll through the list of activities looking for any “!” hazard symbols in the second column.
  • Click on the activity to edit and complete any missing fields.
  • Repeat this checking process for the other activity types by clicking on “University and Public Service” and Professional Competence” in the top sub-menu.
  • Once you no longer see any “!” hazard symbols in your activity lists, try exporting your dossier again.

3.  Edit your MS Word document. The following items are not entered into Project Board, so you’ll do them manually in your MS Word document:

  • Additional program summary narrative sections: University/Public Service, Professional Competence, Affirmative Action, Acceleration Statements
  • Project summary table – funding information only
  • List of professional associations / disciplinary societies.

4.  If you have a multi-year review, you’ll select a multi-year dossier export using the date dropdown menu and/or copy/paste between dossier documents to compile one dossier  document covering all the years under review.

5.  Upload your dossier documents into Interfolio (from ANR Portal, click on the 2018 link under Academic Program Review) then the blue “upload” button. You will see the dossier items that are required for your action (similar to previous years’ in the old review system).

6.  Names and contact information for Confidential Letters of Evaluation, if required, are entered into a Qualtrics Survey that you will receive from Academic Human Resources.

7.  Remember that the due date for uploading and submitting your annual evaluation or merit/promotion packages in Interfolio is  February 1st (11:59PM).

8.  All Supervisor reviews are due in Interfolio in March (exact dates announced by Academic Human Resources)

 

COVID-19 Guidance
Download COVID-19 Guidance in MS Word

 

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