UC ANR Strategic Initiatives
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Hospitals are putting more fresh, local food on patient trays

UC researchers studied farm-to-hospital initiatives in the Bay Area, and they found a growing movement to put locally produced food on patient trays and cafeteria menus. They say that buying from local farmers and ranchers is part of a trend toward better quality and flavor in hospital meals, both to satisfy consumer demand and to address concerns about dietary contributions to chronic disease.

"Just replacing food-service cans with locally grown vegetables won't curb high rates of obesity and heart disease, but it may encourage patients and cafe customers to increase their daily intake of vegetables," said study co-author Gail Feenstra. "And if there's one piece of firm advice from nutritionists, it's to eat more fruits and vegetables."

One example of a "farm-to-hospital" initiative is the John Muir Health System facilities in the East Bay, where executive chef Alison Negrin (formerly chef at some of the Bay Area's best known restaurants, including Chez Panisse) has replaced all frozen vegetables with fresh produce, most of which is grown within 150 miles of the hospital.

Now John Muir patient lunch trays feature a local, seasonal fruit of the day. John Muir cafes offer bowls of citrus fruits from Capay Valley orchards and steam trays of fresh broccoli and cauliflower grown in Monterey County, local mixed lettuces in the salad bars and grass-fed beef from area ranches in the hamburgers.

Hospitals have the buying power to make a big difference in local food networks, Feenstra said. "They buy more than $12 billion of food every year."

The report, "Emerging Local Food Purchasing Initiatives in Northern California Hospitals," is available online at http://sarep.ucdavis.edu/cdpp/fti/.

Attached Files
Hospital food

Hospital food
Hospital food

Posted on Wednesday, December 2, 2009 at 10:26 AM
Tags: farm-to-fork (3), hospital (1), sustainable (14)

FAQ System Training on Monday, November 16

Dear Master Gardeners, Coordinators and Advisors:

The Statewide Master Gardener Office will be conducting an ON-LINE training about the FAQ System on next Monday, November 16th, at 11:00am. (For those of you that are unable to attend the Monday morning on-line training, we will be recording the training session and will share the URL with you after the training session has been completed).  To attend the on-line training just cut and paste this URL into your web browser:

URL: https://breeze.ucdavis.edu/faq/

Where it says "Guest" please enter your name and county. 

We will send out a reminder email w/ link and login information about the online training on this Friday, the 13th (lucky day).

The FAQ system is a new online system to assist Master Gardener volunteers find answers to hotline/help desk questions. The FAQ system (Frequently Asked Questions) enable volunteers to provide feedback to other FAQ’s and the ability to post their own questions with descriptions and photographs. UCCE Master Gardeners can access the FAQ system through the VMS, or through their UC portal.

For additional information and instruction on using the FAQ system, please click (or cut and paste the link into your browser) on the link below. This first link is the FAQ Introductory video. There are a total of six short videos that will guide you through the FAQ system, at the end of each video; there will be a prompt to continue on to the next video.

http://stream.ucanr.org/mastergardener/mg_faq_intro/index.html

For more information or questions about the FAQ system, please contact James Sigala, Program Representative, UC Statewide Master Gardener Program, at jsigala@ucdavis.edu , (530) 865-1261. This project was made possible by a grant from the Elvenia J. Slosson Endowment and UCANR Communication Services. Project
Posted on Tuesday, November 10, 2009 at 3:38 PM

NEW FAQ (Frequently Asked Questions) System Now Available on VMS

The Statewide Master Gardener Program and ANR Communication Services are pleased to announce the launch of our new online system to assist Master Gardener volunteers find answers to hotline/help desk questions. The FAQ system (Frequently Asked Questions) enable volunteers to provide feedback to other FAQ’s and the ability to post their own questions with descriptions and photographs. UCCE Master Gardeners can access the FAQ system through the VMS, or through their UC portal. For further information and instruction on using the FAQ system, please click on the link below.  This first link is the FAQ Introductory video.  There are a total of six short videos that will guide you through the FAQ system, at the end of each video, there will be a prompt to continue on to the next video.

 http://stream.ucanr.org/mastergardener/mg_faq_intro/index.html

For more information or questions about the FAQ system, please contact James Sigala, Program Representative, UC Statewide Master Gardener Program, at jsigala@ucdavis.edu , (530) 865-1261.  This project was made possible by a grant from the Elvenia J. Slosson Endowment and UCANR Communication Services.  Project PIs include Pamela M. Geisel,  Scott Oneto, Dave Krause and Karl Krist.     Project Staff:  James Sigala

Special Thanks to our project Beta Testers:   David Alosi, Gail Barchfeld, Suzi Bender, Christie Bloomberg, Jackie Brooks, Lisa Chrisman, Gail Cole, Emma Connery, Amanda Crump, Mike Dragoon, Leigh Dragoon, Delynda Eldridge, Beatrice Etchison, Carole Frost, March Hachman, Gerry Hernandez, Renate Heyner, Steven Hightower, Kathy Jones, Ted Langlet, Vince Lazaneo, Devan Leni, Sue Leisca, Rena Marticorena, Peggy Mathers, Bella May, Donna Miller, Peggy Millson-Wu, Marinne Mueller, Amelia, Lisa Neufeld, Bill Nugent, Pauline Pedigo, Martha Platt, Stephanie Pocock, Michael Poe, Stephen Rae, Yvonne Rasmussen, Sandy Riegler, Colleen Salomon, Melanie Sarksian, Yvonne Savio, Ladd Sievenpiper, Bonnie Spamer, Mary Steele, Margaret Stelmok, Sharon Stolen, Tonya Taylor, Linda Thompson, John Vafis, Kristina Van Wert, Beverly Vasconcellos,  Nyla Wiebe and JT Williams

Posted on Thursday, October 29, 2009 at 8:33 AM

New Pests Found in Grapevines

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Two new serious pests have appeared in the western United States in the past months. Please familiarize yourselves with the biology and morphology of these pests so you can identify them.

The first is the European Grapevine Moth, which was found in the Napa Valley of California in October 2009.  This is the first occurrence of this moth in the United States. It is a serious pest of grape, feeding on the flowers and bunches. It is found in Southern Europe, North Africa, Anatolia, the Caucasus, and since 2008, in Chile.  The wingspan is 12-13 mm.  In September, The Napa County Ag Commissioner became aware of significant damage and crop loss occurring in Oakville and Rutherford area vineyards. Growers were finding numerous larvae in winegrape fruit clusters and experiencing significant crop damage or loss primarily from subsequent botrytis bunch rot. Growers had been asked to keep their eyes open for the presence of the Light Brown Apple Moth (LBAM), and many contacted their office and provided samples of damaged fruit, larvae, etc. Staff biologists also visited sites to conduct vineyard surveys and collect additional samples. These moth larvae and pupae samples were sent to the California Department of Food and Agriculture laboratory for analysis and were determined to not be LBAM or other common species, such as Orange Tortrix or Omnivorous Leafroller. CDFA entomologists utilizing newly acquired genetic lab techniques were subsequently able to identify the European Grapevine Moth, a very destructive pest of winegrapes which has never before been seen in the United States. 

The second pest is Cherry Vinegar Fly (CVF) , now called the Spotted Wing  Wing Drosophila, (Drosophila suzukii ) was detected by the California Department of Food and Agriculture in fresh cherries near Gilroy CA in 2009. It now has been detected all along the west coast. The reports note that the larvae are found in ripe but undamaged fruit. The skin of the fruit has small holes resembling oviposition scars. According to the Oregon Department of Agriculture, fruits attacked include apple, blueberry, cane berries, cherry, peach, persimmon, plum, grape, and strawberry that it is also found in wine and table grapes. It is also found in Florida and As of October 13, 2009, the ODA reports it has also been found in wine and table grapes.

Special thanks to the Richard Hoenish, Editor of the Western Plant Diagnostic Network Newsletter for the text and photographs of this article from their October 2009 Newsletter.   Used by permission.   

Posted on Thursday, October 22, 2009 at 4:19 PM

Interesting Symptoms on Pear

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As a Master Gardener, you get a lot of samples of plant problems in your office.  I recently received a sample of Bradford pear leaves (Pyrus calleryana) with very interesting symptoms.  At first, I thought that the plant may have been picking up something that was toxic to it because it appeared that the leaf was showing dieback progressively from the middle of the leave out to the margins.  At least I thought that was what I was seeing.  However, upon further inspection and discussion with the owner, I realized that the dieback was actually a fairly quick but progressive drying from the margins inward toward the middle.  The brown part at the mid-vein was from sunburn and was the last part to dry out whereas the margins dried very quickly without actually sun burning.  It turned out that the woman and her husband were very ill for a month or so in the middle of summer and were unable to get out and water (they didn’t have automatic sprinklers).  The point of the story?  Snap judgments can be dangerous.  To learn more about pests and problems with Bradford Pear…….

Posted on Thursday, October 1, 2009 at 9:46 AM

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